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Full text of "State record North Carolina"

Digitized by tine Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



littp://www.archive.org/details/staterecordnorth1973nort 



North 1974-7( 

Carolina 

State 
University Bulletin 




Graduate Cataloe^ 




Poe Hall, headquarters of the School of Education, is one of 120 bialdings located on 
596 acres which makes up the central campus of North Carolina State University. 



VOLUME 73 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE ITVIVERSITY BULLETIN 
DECEMBER 1973 



Nl MBER 4 



Published four times a year in February. June, August and December by North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. Department of Admissions. F'eele Hall, F. O. Box 5126. Raleigh, N. C. 27607. Set ond class 
postage paid at Kaleigh, N. C. 27611. 

Maxine F. Shane, University Catalog Editor; Joseph S. Hancock. .Assistant Director, Publications; 
Hardy D. Berry, Director, Information Services. 




North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Graduate Catalog 

1974-76 



Nortli Carolina State University 




North Carolina State University ranges from this coitral campus in Raleigh to sites 
throughout the state, including research stations and forests, biology and ecology 
sites, nurseries, and coastal facilities. NCSU fulfills three major functions— re- 
search, extension and academic affairs. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



The University of North Carolina 

Sixteen Constituent Institutions 

William Clyde Friday, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., President 

Raymond Howard Dawson, B.A., M.A, Ph.D., Vice President — Academic AJfairs 

Harold Delaney, B. S., M.S., Ph.D., Vice President — Student Services and Special 
Programs 

L. Felix Joyner, A.B., Vice President — Finance 

John L. Sanders, A.B., J.D., Vice President — Planning 

George Eldridge Bair, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director of Editcational Television 

James L. Jenkins Jr., A.B., Assistant to the President 

Edgar Walton Jones, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Associate Vice President, Research and 

Public Service 
John P. Kennedy Jr., S.B., B.A., M.A., J.D., Secretary of the University 
Arnold Kimsey King, A.B., AM., Ph.D., Assistant to the President 
Roscoe D. McMillan, Jr., B.S., Assistant to the President for Governmental Affairs 
Richard H. Robinson Jr., AB., LL.B., Assistant to the President 
Alexander Hurlbutt Shepard Jr., M.A., Assistant Vice President — Finance and 

Treasurer 
J. Lem Stokes H, A.B., M.Div., Ph.D., Associate Vice President — Academic Affairs 
Robert W. Williams, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Vice President — Academic Affairs 

The University of North Carolina was chartered in 1789 and opened its doors to 
students at its Chapel Hill campus in 1795. Throughout most of its history, it has 
been governed by a Board of Trustees chosen by the Legislature and presided over 
by the Governor. During the period 1917-1972, the Board consisted of 100 elected 
members and a varying number of ex-officio members. 

By act of the General Assembly of 1931, without change of name, it was merged 
with The North Carolina College for Women at Greensboro and The North Carolina 
State College of Agriculture and Engineering at Raleigh to form a multicampus 
institution designated The University of North Carolina. 

In 1963 the General Assembly changed the name of the campus at Chapel Hill to 
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and that at Greensboro to The 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro and, in 1965, the name of the campus 
at Raleigh was changed to North Carolina State University at Raleigh. 

Charlotte College was added as The University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 
1965, and, in 1969, Asheville-Biltmore College and Wilmington College became The 
University of North Carolina at Asheville and The University of North Carolina at 
Wilmington respectively. 

A revision of the North Carolina State Constitution adopted in November 1970 
included the following: "The General Assembly shall maintain a public system of 
higher education, comprising The University of North Carolina and such other insti- 
tutions of higher education as the General Assembly may deem wise. The General 
Assembly shall provide for the selection of trustees of The University of North 
Carolina . . . ." In slightly different language, this provision had been in the Consti- 
tution since 1868. 

On October 30, 1971, the General Assembly in special session merged, without 
changing their names, the remaining 10 state-supported senior institutions into the 
University as follows: Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, 
Elizabeth City State University, Fayetteville State University, North Carolina 
Agricultural and Technical State University, North Carolina Central University, 
North CaroHna School of the Arts, Pembroke State University, Western Carolina 
University, and Winston-Salem State University. This merger, which resulted in a 
statewide multi-campus university of 16 constituent institutions, became effective 
on July 1, 1972. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



The constitutionally authorized Board of Trustees was designated the Board of 
Governors, and the number was reduced to 32 members elected by the General 
Assembly and with the authority to choose its own chairman and other officers. 
The Board is "responsible for the general determination, control, supervision, man- 
agement, and governance of all affairs of the constituent institutions." However, 
each constituent institution has its own board of trustees of 13 members, eight of 
whom are appointed by the Board of Governors, four by the Governor, and one of 
whom, the elected president of the student body, serves ex officio. The principal 
powers of each institutional board are exercised under a delegation from the Board 
of Governors. 

Each institution has its own faculty and student body, and each is headed by a 
chancellor as its chief administrative officer. Unified general policy and appro- 
priate allocation of function are effected by the Board of Governors and by the 
President with the assistance of other administrative officers of the University. 
The General Administration office is located in Chapel Hill. 

The chancellors of the constituent institutions are responsible to the President as 
the chief administrative and executive officer of The University of North Carolina. 



Residence halls, in the foreground, are conveniently located near NCSU's central 
University Plaza where the D. H. Hill Library (far left) offers services. 



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CONTENTS 

Administration 7 

The Calendar 8 

North Carohna State University 15 

The Graduate School 17 

The D. H. Hill Library 17 

Institutes 18 

Special Laboratories and Facilities 22 

Special Training Programs 26 

Other Programs 27 

General Information 28 

Admissions 28 

Registration 31 

Tuition and Fees 34 

Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships 39 

Other Financial Aid 40 

Military Education and Training 41 

Housing 42 

Graduate Degrees 45 

Master of Science and Master of Arts Degrees 45 

Master's Degree in a Designated Field 49 

Master of Agriculture Degree and Master of Life 

Science Degree 51 

Summary of Procedures for the Master's Degree in 

a Designated Field 51 

Summary of Procedures for the Master of Science Degree 

and the Master of Arts Degree 53 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 54 

Doctor of Education Degree 59 

Summary of Procedures for the Doctor of Philosophy 

and Doctor of Education Degrees 59 

Fields of Instruction 64 

Graduate Faculty 283 

University Disruptions Policy and Procedures 322 

Index 326 

Campus Map 328 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 




Dr. Walter J. Peterson 
Dean of the Graduate School 



The Graduate Sch(X)l of North (^aroHna State I'niversity hits developed most 
signifiamtly in lx)th qiiahtative and (jiiantitative dimensions in the hist 17 years, 
during the tenure of Dean Peterson, dean of the Graduate School, 1957-1974. 
Some 60 masters and 40 doctoral progriuns are now offered. Graduate enrollment 
was 508 in 1957; in the fall of 1973 it reached 2,370. The development of the 
Graduate School has been a significiuit feature of the University's service. (State- 
ment by Chancellor |ohn T. Caldwell) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ADMINISTRATION 



John T. Caldwell, Chancellor 

Harry C. Kelly, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost 

John D. Wright, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business 

Walter J. Peterson, Dean, Graduate School 

Earl G. Droessler, Administrative Dean for Research 

William L. Turner, Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

Jackson A. Rigney, Dean, International Programs 

Deans of Schools 

James E. Legates, Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Claude E. McKinney, Design 

Carl J. Dolce, Education 

Ralph E. Fadum, Engineering 

Eric L. Ellwood, Forest Resources 

Robert O. Tilman, Liberal Arts 

Arthur C. Menius, Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

David W. Chaney, Textiles 

Graduate School — Administrative OflFice 

Walter J. Peterson, Dean 
Ralph J. Peeler, Assistant Dean 
Patsy H . Lloyd, Assistant to the Dean 



Graduate School — Administrative Board 

Term Expires 
Walter J. Peterson, Dean 
Ralph J. Peeler, Assistant Dean 

Richard R. Wilkinson, Prof and Head Landscape Architecture May 1975 

Howard M. Nahikian, Prof of Mathematics March 1975 

William A. Jackson, Reynolds Prof, of Soil Science July 1975 
LeRoy C. Saylor, Prof of Genetics and Forestry, Assistant Dean 

Forest Resources July 1975 

Wesley O. Doggett, Prof, of Physics Sept. 1975 
Durwin M. Hanson, Prof and Head Industrial and Technical 

Education Nov. 1975 

Larry S. Champion, Prcf. and Head English Feb. 1976 

Solomon P. Hersh, Cannon Prof of Textiles Sept. 1976 
Carl F. Zorowski, Reynolds Prof of Mechanical Engineering and 

Head Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering March 1977 

Philip A, Miller, Prof, of Crop Science and Genetics Nov. 1977 

Thomas S. Elleman, Professor of Nuclear Engineering Dec. 1977 



8 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



THE CALENDARS 



FALL SEMESTER 

August 20-24 

August 27 



September 12 

October 19 
November 2 
November 9 



1973 

Mon.-Fri. 

Mon. 



August 28 
August 29 


Tues. 
Wed. 


September 3 
September 5 


Mon. 
Wed. 



Wed. 

Fri. 
Fri. 
Fri. 



November 21 


Wed. 


November 26 


Mon. 


December 7 


Fri. 


December 8-9 


Sat.-Sun. 


December 10-19 


Mon. -Sat. 




Mon. -Wed. 



Opening days (counseling, advising, late 
orientation, etc.). 

General faculty meeting. Registration day 
— all students complete registration. 
Change day. (Late registration, drop/ add.) 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to add a course. Last day for filing 
application for admission to candidacy for 
students expecting to complete require- 
ments for the master's degree in December, 
1973. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course with 
refund. 

M i d-t eiTO r eport s du e. 
Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for the master's and doctoral degrees in 
December, 1973. Last day for taking final 
oral examiruitions by candidates for master's 
degrees not requiring theses. 
Thanksgiving holidays begin at 1 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day of classes. 
Heading days. 

Final exiuninations. 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1974 
January 7 Mon. 



January 8 
January 9 
January 16 



Tues. 
Wed. 
Wed. 



Opening day (coimseling, advising, new 
student orientation, etc.). Registration day 
— all students complete registration. 
Change day. (Late registration, drop/add.) 
First day of classes. 

Last day to add a course. Last day for filing 
applications for admission to candidacy for 



NOTE: Chairmen of doctoral advisory committees are reminded to schedule preliminary examinations 
for their students at least one semester before the anticipated date for scheduling the final oral exami- 
nation. 

* The calendar is tentative, subject to approval or change by the Board of Trustees. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



January 23 


Wed 


March 1 


Fri. 


March 11 


Mon 


March 15 


Fri. 


March 29 


Fri. 



April 15 


Mon. 


April 26 


Fri. 


April 27-28 


Sat. -Sun. 


April 29-May 8 


Mon. -Sat. 




Mon. -Wed. 


May 11 


Sat. 


SUMMER SESSIONS, 


1974 


First Session 




May 20 


Mon. 


May 21 


Tues. 


May 24 


Fri. 



May 28 



Tues. 



June 6 
June 24 
June 25 



Thurs. 

Mon. 

Tues. 



students expecting to complete require- 
ments for the masters degree in May and 
July, 1974. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course with 
refund. 

Mid-term reports due. Spring vacation be- 
gins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for the masters and doctoral degrees in 
May, 1974. Last day for taking final oral 
examination by candidates for master s 
degrees not requiring theses. 
Holiday. 

Last day of classes. 
Reading days. 

Final examinations. 
Commencement. 



Registration day — all students complete 
registration. 
First day of classes. 

Last day to register; last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with refund. 
Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for masters and doctoral degrees in July, 
1974. Last day for taking final oral exami- 
nations by candidates for masters degrees 
not requiring theses. Last day for filing ap- 
plication for admission to candidacy for stu- 
dents expecting to complete requirements 
for the masters degree in August, 1974. 
Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



NOTE: Chairmen of doctoral advisory committees are reminded to schedule preliminary examinations 
for their students a least one semester before the anticipated date for scheduling the final oral exami- 
nation. 



10 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Second Session 




Julyl 


Mon, 


July 2 
July 4 
Julys 


Tues. 

Thurs. 

Mon. 



July 10 



Wed 



July 19 


Fri. 


August 6 


Tues. 


August 7 


Wed 



Registration day — all students complete 
registration. 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to register, last day to withdraw or 
drop a course with refund. 
Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for the master's and doctoral degrees in 
August, 1974. Last day for taking final oral 
examinations by candidates for the master's 
degree not requiring theses. 
Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



FALL SEMESTER, 1974 

August 19-23 Mon. -Fri. 



August 26 



September 11 

October 18 
November 1 
November 8 



November 27 
December 2 



Mon. 



August 27 


Tues, 


August 28 


Wed. 


September 2 


Mon. 


September 4 


Wed. 



Wed. 

Fri. 
Fri. 
Fri. 



Wed. 
Mon. 



Opening days (counseling, advising, late 
orientation, etc.). 

General faculty meeting. All students com- 
plete registration. 

Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to add a course. Last day for filing 
application for admission to candidacy for 
students expecting to complete require- 
ments for the master's degree in December, 
1974. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course with 
refund. 

Mid-term reports due. 
Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for the master's and doctoral degrees in 
December, 1974. Last day for taking final 
oral examinations by candidates for mas- 
ter's degrees not requiring theses. 
Thanksgiving vacation begins at 1 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 



NOTE: Chairmen of doctoral advisory committees are reminded to schedule preliminary examinations 
for their students at least one semester before the anticipated date for scheduling the final oral exami- 
nation. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



11 



December 6 
December 7-8 
December 9-18 



Last day of classes, 
l^eading days. 



Fri. 

Sat. -Sun. 
M on. -Sat. 

M on. -Wed. Final examinations. 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1975 

Januaiy 13 Mon. 



[anuary 14 


Tues. 


[anuaiy 15 


Wed. 


[anuary 22 


Wed. 



January 29 

March 7 

March 17 
March 21 
March 31 
April 4 



May 2 
May 3-4 
May 5-14 

May 17 



Wed. 

Fri. 

Mon. 
Fri. 
Mon. 
Fri. 



Fri. 

Sat. -Sun. 
Mon. -Sat. 
Mon. -Wed. 
Sat. 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1975' 

First Session 

May 20 Tues. 



May 21 
May 26 



Wed. 
Mon. 



Opening day (counseling, advising, new 
student orientation, etc.). Registration day 
— all students complete registration. 
Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 

Last day to add a course. Last cUiy for filing 
application for admission to candidacy for 
siudents expecting to complete require- 
ments for the masters degree in May and 
July, 1975. 

Last day to withdiaw (or drop a course) 
with refimd. 

Mid-tenn reports due; spring vacation be- 
gins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Holiday. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for master's and doctoral degrees in May 
1975. Last day for taking final oral exami- 
nations by candidates for masters degrees 
not requiring theses. 
Last day of classes. 
Heading days. 

Fiuixl examinations. 
Commencement. 



Registration day — all students complete 

registration. 

First day of classes. 

Last day to register; last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with refund. 



NOTE: Chairmen of doctoral advisory committees are reminded to schedule preliminary examinations 
for their students at least one semester before the anticipated date for scheduling the final oral exami- 
nation. 

* Tentative calendar, subject to change. 



12 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



May 27 



Tues. 



June 6 
June 24 
June 25 


Fri. 

Tues. 

Wed. 


Second Session 




June 30 


Mon. 


lulvl 
July 3 


Tues. 
Thurs, 


July 4 
July 9 


Fri. 
Wed. 



July 18 


Fri. 


August 5 


Tues, 


August 6 


Wed. 



Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for master's and doctoral degrees in July, 
1975. Last day for taking final oral exami- 
nations by candidates for master's degrees 
not requiring theses. Last day for filing 
application for admission to candidacy for 
students expecting to complete require- 
ments for the master's degree in August 
1975. 

Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Registration day — all students complete regis- 
tration. 

First day of classes. 

Last day to register; last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with refund. 
Holiday. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for the master's and doctoral degrees in 
August, 1975. Last day for taking final oral 
examinations by candidates for the master s 
degree not requiring theses. 
Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



FALL SEMESTER, 1975 

August 18-22 Mon.-Fri. 



August 25 



Mon. 



August 26 


Tues. 


August 27 


Wed. 


September 1 


Mon. 


September 3 


Wed. 



Opening days (counseling, advising, orien- 
tation, etc.). 

General faculty meeting. All students com- 
plete registration. 

Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to add a course. Last day for filing 
application for admission to candidacy for 
students expecting to complete require- 



NOTE: Chairmen of doctoral advisory committees are reminded to schedule preliminary examinations 
for their students at least one semester before the anticipated date for scheduling the final oral exami- 
nation. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



13 



September 10 

October 17 
October 31 
November 7 



Wed. 

Fri. 
Fri. 
Fri. 



November 26 


Wed. 


December 1 


Mon. 


December 5 


Fri. 


December 6-7 


Sat. -Sun. 


December 8-17 


Mon.-Sat. 




Mon. -Wed. 



mentsfor the master's degree in December, 
1975. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course with 
refund. 

M id-term reports due. 
Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for the master's and doctoral degrees in 
December, 1 975. Last day for taking final 
oral examinations by candidates for master's 
degrees not requiring theses. 
Thanksgiving vacation begins at 1 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day of classes. 
Reading days. 

Final examinations. 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1976 



ry 12 



fanuary 1.3 
January 14 
[anuarv 21 



April 19 
April 30 



Mon. 



Tues. 
Wed. 
Wed. 



January 28 


Wed. 


March 5 


Fri. 


March 15 


Mon. 


March 19 


Fri. 


April 2 


Fri. 



Mon. 
Fri. 



Opening day (counseling, advising, new 
student orientation, etc.). .\11 students com- 
plete registration. 

Change day (late registration, drop/add). 
First day of classes. 

Last day to add a course. Last day for fding 
applications for admission to candidacy for 
students expecting to complete require- 
ments for the master's degree in May and 
July, 1976. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course with 
refund. 

Mid-teiTTi reports due; spring vacation be- 
gins at 10 p.m. 
Classes resume at 8 a.m. 
Last day to drop a course without a grade. 
Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to Graduate School by candidates for 
the master's and doctoral degrees in De- 
cember, 1976. Last day for taking final 
oral examinations by candidates for mas- 
ter's degrees not requiring theses. 
Holiday. 
Last day of classes. 



NOTE: Chairmen of doctoral advisory committees are reminded to schedule preliminary examinations 
for their students at least one semester before the anticipated date for scheduling the final oral exami- 
nation. 



14 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

May 1-2 Sat. -Sun. Heading davs. 

May 3-12 Mon.-Sat. 

M on. -Wed. Finiil exiiminations. 
May 15 Sat. Commencement. 

SUMMER SESSIONS, 1976° 

First Session 

May 18 Tues. Registration day— all students complete regis- 

tration. 

May 19 Wed. First day of classes. 

May 24 Mon. Last day to register; last day to withdraw or 

drop a course with refund. 

May 26 Wed. Deadline for submission of theses in final 

form to Graduate School by candidates for 
the master's and doctoral degrees in July 
1976. Last day for taking final oral exami- 
nation by candidates for master's degrees 
not requiring theses. Last day for filing ap- 
plication for admission to candidacy for stu- 
dents expecting to complete requirements 
for the master's degree in August 1976. 

June 4 Fri. Last day to withdiaw or drop a course with- 

out a grade. 
Last day of chisses. 
Final examinations. 



Registration day— all students complete 
registration. 
First day of classes. 

Last day to register; last day to withdraw 
or drop a course with refund. 
Holidiiy. 

Deadline for submission of theses in final 
form to the Graduate School by candidates 
for the master's and doctoral degree in 
August 1976. Last day for taking final oral 
examinations by candidates for master's 
degrees not requiring theses. 

July 16 Fri. Last day to withdiaw or di'op a coiuse 

without a grade. 

Aug 3 Tues. Lixst day of classes. 

August 4 Wed. Final examinations. 



June 22 


Tues. 


June 23 


Wed. 


Second Session 




June 28 


Mon. 


June 29 


Tues. 


July 2 


Fri. 


Julys 


Mon. 


July 7 


Wed. 



NOTE: Chairmen of doctoral advisory committees are reminded to schedule preliminary examinations 
for their students at least one semester before the anticipated date for scheduling the final oral exami- 
nation. 

* Tentative calendar, subject to change. 





M 


* 




-^.^ 


^- ^ 



The D. H. Hill Library, facing University Plaza, houses a 650,000-volume collection 
which serves graduaie students in educational and research programs. 



NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 

North Carolina State University is a large and complex state university, one of 
the major state universities of the nation. 

It shares the distinctive character of Land-Grant state universities nationally- 
broad academic offerings, extensive public involvement, national and international 
activities, and large-scale extension and research programs. 

State was founded as a Land-Grant state university under terms of the famed 
federal Morrill Act of 1862 which provided for public land endowments to support 
a public institution in each state. 

The Land-Grant heritage of fulfilling three major functions— research, extension 
and academic affairs— is reflected in the large dimensions of these functions at 
North Carolina State University. 

The rich and varied academic program of the University is comprised of some 
70 bachelors of arts and science programs, 67 master's degree fields and 45 doctoral 
degrees. The University offers about 2,300 courses. 



16 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Its research activities span a broad spectrum of about 700 scientific, technologic 
and scholarly endeavors, with a budget of about $20 million annually. 

Extension programs of the University are similarly diverse and include urban 
affiiirs, marine sciences, environmental protection, engineering, industrial and 
textiles extension, agricultural extension and many others. 

The annual University budget is about $80 million. The University has 4,600- 
plus employees. There are 1,621 faculty and professional staff and 157 adjunct and 
federal agency faculty, including 974 graduate faculty. 

There are 120 campus buildings with an estimated value of about $120,000,000. 

The central campus is 596 acres, though the University hiis 88,000 acres, includ- 
ing one research and endowment forest of 78,000 acres. Research farms; biology 
and ecology sites; genetics, and horticulture, and floriculture nurseries; and Carter 
Stadium areas near the main campus comprise about 2,500 acres. 

Principal operational locations for the University in North Carolina are the 
Marine Sciences Center at Wilmington, the Fisheries Laboratory at Hatteras, the 
Minerals Research Laboratory at Asheville, the Pamlico Marine Laboratory at 
Aurora, and the 20 agricultural research stations and forests. 

North Carolina State University is one of the three Research Triangle Univer- 
sities along with Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. In the 30-mile triangle formed by the three Universities is the 5,000-acre 
Research Triangle Park, the Research Triangle Institute, a Universities' subsidiary, 
and the Triangle Universities Computation Center, a central facility for the ex- 
tensive computing centers of the institutions. 

The University's total enrollment is about 14,200. There are 11,640 under- 
graduates, 2,-375 graduate students and about 200 special and other students. Stu- 
dents at State come from all 50 states and some 50 other countries. The inter- 
national enrollment is a distinctive feature of the institution since its 430 inter- 
national students give it a decidedly cosmopolitan aura. 

North Carolina State University is organized in eight schools and the Graduate 
School. The eight schools are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Design, Education, 
Engineering, Forest Resources, Liberal Arts, Physical and Mathematical Sciences 
and Textiles. In addition a complex of divisions and programs provide for a wide 
range of special programs in academic affairs, research and extension. 

State is one of 118 recognized members of the National .Association of State 
Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. It is also a member of the .American Council 
on Education, the College Entrance Exiunination Board, the Council of Graduate 
Schools in the United States, the National Commission on .Accrediting, the Oak 
Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies and the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools. 

The University is accredited by national and regional accrediting agencies ap- 
plicable to the University and its numerous professional fields. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 17 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



The Graduate School at North CaroHna State University offers programs leading 
to master of science degrees in 53 fields of study, masters of arts degrees in four, 10 
"master of degrees, the Doctor of Philosophy in 39 and the Doctor of Education 
in six. The Graduate School includes 974 faculty. 

Graduate instruction at North Carolina State University is organized to provide 
opportunity and facilities for advanced study and research in the fields of agri- 
culture and life sciences, design, education, engineering, forestry, liberal arts, 
physical and mathematical sciences, technological education and textiles. The 
purpose of these graduate programs is to develop in advanced students a more 
adequate comprehension of the requirements and responsibilities essential for 
independent research investigation. In all the graduate programs emphasis is 
placed upon a high level of scholarship rather than upon the satisfaction of specific 
course or credit requirements. 

Exceptional facilities for graduate study are provided at North Carolina State 
University. New buildings furnish modern well -equipped laboratories for graduate 
study in specialized scientific and technological areas. 

A high degree of cooperation and coordination exists between the graduate pro- 
grams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of North 
Carolina at Greensboro and North Carolina State University. This coordination is 
effected through the Graduate Executive Council of the Consolidated University, 
composed of representatives of the administrative boards of these three institutions 
and the academic vice-president of the statewide University of North Carolina 
system. 



The D. H. Hill Library 

Library facilities at North Carolina State University include the main D. H. Hill 
Library and special libraries for the Schools of Design, Textiles, and Forest Re- 
sources. The collections, totaling more than 650,000 volumes, have been carefully 
assembled to serve the educational and research programs of the University. 

The D. H. Hill Library contains particularly strong research holdings in the 
biological and physical sciences, in all fields of engineering, agriculture and forestry. 
The 6,000 volume Friedrich F. Tippmann collection in the field of entomology and 
related biological sciences is one of the outstanding collections in the country. The 
collection of books and journals in the humanities and social sciences is especially 
helpfiil to undergraduate students. 

The library's comprehensive collection of scientific journals emphasizes the 
major teaching and research interests at State; approximately 7,000 journals are 
received regularly. A large collection of state and federal government publications 
further strengthens the library's research material. The D. H. Hill Library is a 



18 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



depository for publications of the Atomic Energy Commission and the Food and 
Agricultural Organization of the United Nations, and has been a depository for 
U. S. federal documents since 1923. 

The Textiles Library, located in Nelson Textile Building, contains holdings in 
the field of textiles and textile chemistry. It is regarded as one of the best textile 
libraries in the country. The School of Design Library, in Brooks Hall, has a fine 
collection of books, journals and slides in the areas of architecture, landscape archi- 
tecture and product design. The Forest Resources Library which contains a limited 
collection of specialized literature is located in Biltmore Hall. 

As a further aid to graduate and faculty research, the library participates in an 
interlibrary loan program with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 
Duke University Research Triangle Institute, IBM, Chemstrand, the Division of 
Environmental Health Services and the N. C. State Library in downtown Raleigh. 
A bus, arriving at North Carolina State University daily Monday through Friday, 
makes resources from these seven libraries available to State students and faculty. 
Among the materials available are approximately 14,000 scientific periodicals. 

The D. H. Hill Library building has been expanded and remodeled for additional 
library seating and open shelf collections. An 11-story addition provides bookstacks 
for a 1,000,000-volume book collection and greatly expanded research facilities, 
including carrels and study areas. 

Among the many services offered by the library are orientation tours for faculty 
and graduate students and also lectures on library use to all new students. Cop- 
prehensive reference service is available almost all the hours the library is open. 
A variety of microtext readers and printers in the library and an extensive micro- 
film collection provide access to much important research material. A music listen- 
ing room is equipped with listening machines for playing taped recordings. One of 
the most widely used services in the library is the photocopy service. Coin-operated 
machines plus two machines operated by staff provide a wide variety of photo- 
copy service, including copy from microfilm. Machines may be used all hours the 
library is open. 

The Curriculum Materials Center, administered by the School of Education, is 
located in Poe Hall. The Center contains an outstanding collection of elementary 
and secondary school curriculum materials in various fields ranging from films and 
slides to audio tapes and simulation games. Audiovisual equipment is available 
to preview materials in the Center. 



Institutes 

INSTITUTE OF STATISTICS 

The Institute of Statistics is composed of two sections, one at Raleigh and the 
other at Chapel Hill. At North Carolina State University, the Institute provides 
statistical consulting services to all branches of the institution, sponsors research in 
statistical theory and methodology, and coordinates the teaching of statistics at 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 19 



the undergraduate and graduate levels. The instructional and other academic 
functions are performed by the Department of Statistics, which forms a part of the 
Institute. 



WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

The Water Resources Research Institute is a unit of the University of North 
Carolina System and is located on the campus of North Carolina State University. 
The deans of the Graduate School, School of Engineering and School of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences at North Carolina State University and two faculty members fiom 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill serve as a board of directors. The 
Institute was established to promote a multidisciplinary attack on water problems, 
to develop and support research in response to the needs of North Carolina, to 
encourage strengthened educational programs in water resources, to coordinate 
research and educational programs dealing with water resources, and to provide 
a link between the state and federal water resources agencies and related interests 
in the University. 

Research and educational activities are conducted through established depart- 
ments and schools of the University System. All senior colleges and univer- 
sities of North Carolina are eligible to participate in the Institute's research pro- 
gram. Applications for research grants must be received by September 1 for the 
Matching Grants Program and February 1 for the Annual Allotment Program pre- 
ceding the fiscal year for which funds are requested. Basic support for the Insti- 
tute's program is provided by the OfiRce of Water Resources Research, U. S. De- 
partment of the Interior, under the Water Resources Research Act of 1964 and 
appropriations from the State of North Carolina. 

The Institute has sponsored a graduate minor in water resources which offers 
a strong water resources program with the major in any of the basic disciplines 
contributing to water resources planning, conservation, development and manage- 
ment. This capitalizes on the combined training resources of the Raleigh and 
Chapel Hill campuses of the University System and offers these in an organized 
way to graduate students seeking interdisciplinary training in this field. Additional 
information concerning the program is presented elsewhere in this catalog. 

The Institute sponsors research and educational symposia and seminars, en- 
courages the development of specialized training opportunities, and provides a 
means for the continuing evaluation and strengthening of the University System's 
total water resources program. 



4'i# 



f 



;v4 



Plasma physics students study the "pinch" effect. 




This one-megawatt PULSTAR re- 
actor is used for teaching, research 
and service on behalf of the uni- 
versity. 

Minute objects can be stud- 
ied utilizing the electron 
microscope. 




Physical resources of the School of Textiles 
allow demonstrations of machines and equip- 
ment used in the processing of natural and 
m an-m ade fi be rs . 





Pesticide residues research on 
animals, plants, soils, water and 
other entities is undertaken in the 
Pesticide Residue Research 
Laboratory by graduate students 
and members of cooperating de- 
partments. 



The Phytotron is a controlled environmental facility which makes possible a variety 
of plant experiments. 




22 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Special Laboratories and Facilities 
ADULT LEARNING CENTER 

The Adult Learning Center is an organizational unit in the School of Education 
at North Carolina State University and is an integral part of the research and devel- 
opment program of the School of Education. 

Established in 1967, the Center is committed to seeking new ways and means for 
facilitating the intellectual growth and development of adults, .\mong the objectives 
of the Center is the provision of national leadership in the development and imple- 
mentation of experimental and demonstration projects which give promise of 
materially improving adult education programs. 

The Center maintains on the campus of North Carolina State University an adult 
learning laboratory, the primary purpose of which is to further the use of program- 
med instruction^ materials with undereducated adults. Continuing research is 
conducted in the laboratory to determine the capacity of programmed instructional 
materials to raise effectively and efficiently the general educational level of margin- 
ally literate adults. 



BIOLOGY FIELD LABORATORY 

The Biology Field Laboratory is located eight miles from the University campus 
and comprises a 20-acre pond, 180 acres of extremely varied vegetation types and 
a modem laboratory building. The latter contains two laboratories, one for class use 
and another principally for research, and quarters for a married graduate student 
who serves as custodian of the property. The many unique ecological situations 
found in this area make it ideal for use by advanced classes of most biological sci- 
ence departments. Likewise, the area is well adapted to a variety of research proj- 
ects by faculty, graduate students and undergraduates because of its habitat di- 
versity. The laboratory facility makes possible many types of behavioral, physio- 
logical, ecological, taxonomic and limnological studies that could be accomplished 
only with great difficulty at other locations. Since the site is close to the campus 
and readily accessible, those investigators with campus duties may carry out long- 
term studies there even though frequent observations must be made. 



COMPUTING FACILITIES 

North Carolina State University, Duke University and the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill jointly own the Triangle Universities Computation Center 
(TUCC). This center is equipped with a large computer (IBM System 370, Model 
165) and is located in the Research Triangle Park, about 15 miles from the North 
Carolina State University campus. Data is transmitted to and from the TUCC com- 
puter primarily by electronic means. A variety of input/output facilities are avail- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 23 



able in convenient campus locations. The Computing Center's main facility contains 
an IBM System 360, Model 40 (256K bytes of storage with a 2314 disk facility and 
two nine-track tape drives plus a high resolution plotter) capable of simultaneously 
transmitting work to and from TUCC and processing work locally. There are also 
medium-speed temiinals located in the Schools of Physical and Mathematical Sci- 
ences and Engineering. Many low-speed, keyboard terminals are located through- 
out the campus. A number of special-pui-pose computing facilities also exist. These 
are employed for research purposes in the Schools of Education, Engineering, 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

One of the principal reasons for the extensive computing facilities is to take care 
of the heavy graduate student training and research requirements. The present 
configuration provides for a wide range of computing needs in all disciplines. 
Courses in the use of computers are offered by the Department of Computer Sci- 
ence. 



ELECTRON MICROSCOPE CENTER 

The facilities of the Electron Microscope Center are available to all graduate 
students and faculty within the University for research purposes and to those stu- 
dents who wish only to obtain a general knowledge of electron microscopy techni- 
ques. A charge is assessed when the Center is used for research by faculty and 
graduate students. 

The Center is located in Gardner Hall in a suite of rooms designed specifically 
for electron microscopy. The Center currently provides two transmission electron 
microscopes, a Siemens Elmskop lA and a Hitachi HS-8-B, a specimen preparatory 
laboratory and a completely equipped darkroom. 

Formal instruction is provided in electron microscopic cytological techniques, 
use of transmission and scanning electron microscopes, photographic techniques 
and interpretation of electron micrographs. Instructional tours are available for 
secondary education groups. 



HIGHLANDS BIOLOGICAL STATION 

North Carolina State University is an institutional member of the Highlands 
Biological Station, Inc., an inland biological field station located at Highlands, 
North Carolina. The town of Highlands is in the heart of the Southern Appalachians 
at an elevation of 3,823 feet. The area has an extremely diverse and interesting 
biota and the highest rainfall in the eastern United States. The facilities are avail- 
able throughout the year for pre- and post-doctoral research in botany, zoology, 
soils and geology. The laboratory building with research rooms and cubicles and 
the library are well equipped for pursuit of field research problems. Also, four cot- 
tages and a dining hall are located on the edge of a six-acre lake. In addition to 16 
acres surrounding the lake, the station owns several tracts of undisturbed forested 
land available for research. Research grants are available from the station; the 
stipends are adequate to cover room, board and research expenses. 



24 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



NUCLEAR SERVICE FACILITIES 



Specialized nucleiir service facilities are available to the University faculty, stu- 
dents and industry. The purpose of these facilities is to further the use of nuclear 
energy in engineering research and in scientific and public service programs. The 
facilities include: a 1 megawatt steady-state and pulse, pool-tvpe, research reactor 
(PULSTAR) with a variety of test facilities; a 30,000 curie multi-purpose cobalt-60 
gamma irradiation source which includes a controlled envirnoment support unit; 
intermediate hot laboratories with hoods, junior caves and glove boxes; a neutron 
activation analysis and radioisotope laboratory; Nal and solid-state detectors; 
counting iind photographic rooms. In addition, a new 50,000 sq. ft. Burlington 
Engineering Laboratories complex houses the Department of Nuclear Engineering 
and the Engineering Research Services Division with their associated offices and 
laboratories. All of the facilities including the reactor are on the North Carolina 
State University campus. 



CENTER FOR OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 

Administered by the School of Education, the Center for Research, Develop- 
ment, and Training in Occupational Education is a national research and develop- 
ment center, the mission of which is to improve through research and related 
activity the quality and quantity of occupational education for all persons and 
groups. The total program is focused on problems underlying the development of 
adequate programs of occupational education. 

The program of the Center includes research, developmental, and action projects 
directed by senior members of the faculty. One of the special features of the Center 
is its Research Intern Program for those who are interested in preparing for posi- 
tions as research specialists in occupational education or related fields, and who 
have completed all course requirements for the doctorate. 



PESTICIDE RESIDUE RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory is a facility in the School of .Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences devoted to research on pesticide residues in animals, 
plants, soils, water and other entities of the environment of man. Although the 
laboratory is administered through the Department of Entomology, it serves the 
total needs of the school in cooperative research projects requiring assistance on 
pesticide residue analyses. 

The lalx)ratory functions as a focal point for residue research involving inter- 
departmental cooperation, but faculty in the laboratory also conduct separate re- 
search of their own interest on persistence and decomposition of pesticides in soils 
and plants, absorption iind translocation in plants, distribution in environment, 
and contamination of streams, estuaries and ground water. 

The modern laboratory is equipped with the latest analytical instruments. Grad- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 25 



uate study can be undertaken in any aspect of pesticide residues either in the 
Pesticide Residue Laboratory or in one of the cooperating departments. 

REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY RESEARCH LABORATORY 

The Reproductive Physiolog)' Research Laboratory administered through the 
Department of Animal Science includes four environmental control rooms designed 
to provide constant levels of air temperature, humidity and light for animals in- 
volved in studies on reproduction. Facilities and equipment are available for sur- 
gery, in vitro growth of embryos, isotope labeling in embryo metabolism and trans- 
fer of embryos between females. 

Support for research at both the master's and the doctoral levels is available. 
Students may elect a comparative approach to a specific problem in mammalian 
reproduction, working with several species, or they may choose to work with a sin- 
gle species. Generally students select a problem associated with the identification 
of factors influencing early prenatal development, the endocrine control of ovarian 
function or some aspect of elucidation and control of aberrations in mammalian 
reproduction. 

Cooperative research is possible between the laboratory and the Medical School 
or the Enviornmental Health Sciences Center at the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill for those students desiring a broader training in the general area of 
reproductive physiology. 

Students whose work is concentrated in reproductive physiology can major in 
either animal science or physiology with a minor in related disciplines. 

SOUTHEASTERN PLANT ENVIRONMENT LABORATORIES 

The Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratories operate as a cooperative 
association between North Carolina State University and Duke University with one 
unit, commonly called a phytotron, located on each campus. The laboratory is espe- 
cially designed for research dealing with the response of biological organisms to 
their environment, and the high degree of control makes it possible to duplicate 
any climate fi-om tropical rain forest to arid desert or arctic cold. 

Research in the North Carolina State unit concentrates on agricultural problems 
encountered in the southeastern United States. However, the ability to control all 
phases of the environment allows inclusion of research dealing with space, pollu- 
tion and tropical agriculture as well as basic physiological and biochemical inves- 
tigations. 

The facilities are available to the resident research staff, participants in North 
Carolina State's graduate research program and to domestic and foreign visiting 
scientists. 

TRIANGLE UNIVERSITIES NUCLEAR LABORATORY 

TUNL is a laboratory for research in nuclear structure. It is located on the cam- 
pus of Duke University in Durham and it is staffed by faculty members and gradu- 
ate students in the Departments of Physics of Duke University, the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University. The principal 



26 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



tools of the laboratory are particle accelerators used to bombard target nuclei 
with an assortment of ions of accurately controlled energy and small energy spread. 
For example, protons can be accelerated to desired energies between a few hun- 
dred thousand electron volts and a bit over 30 million electron volts energy. The 
accelerators are a 3 MeV and a 4 MeV Van de GraaflF generator and a 15 MeV 
tandem Van de Graaff generator injected by a 15 MeV AVF cyclotron normally 
accelerating negative ions. An on-line computer is used for data collection and an- 
alysis. 

Personnel from NCSU are participating partners in the maintenance and use of 
the laboratory. Collaboration with personnel from the other two participating uni- 
versities is encouraged. 

This laboratory is the first to combine a cyclotron and tandem Van de GraafF 
generator — the "Cyclo -Graaff." Successful operation began on December 28, 1968. 
The unusual physical facilities and the collaboration of personnel from the three 
universities make this an excellent laboratory. 

Special Training Programs 

INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT 

Food production, control of disease and abatement of pollution are problems of 
national and international concern. Adequate food for burgeoning populations is a 
problem of increasing urgency, and insect pests comprise an important limiting fac- 
tor. Insect control is also of strategic importance in combating arthropod-borne 
diseases of man as well as of his cultivated plants and domesticated animals. Pol- 
lution, a companion problem of food production and disease control, is increasing 
at an alarming rate, partly as a result of inadvisable pest control practices. 

If a viable and aesthetically desirable environment is to be maintained, the ma- 
terials and methods of pest control must be used carefully under the guidance of 
personnel possessing a thorough understanding of ecological principles. A program 
to train such personnel as pest management specialists, including assistantships, is 
available for graduate students with an adequate background in biological sciences, 
chemistry and mathematics. Ecology is fundamental to the pest management con- 
cept since populations, communities and ecosystems are of primary concern in this 
approach to the regulation of pest numbers. 

Trainees will major in entomology but may choose from a wide selection of mi- 
nors such as statistics, biomathematics, genetics, microbiology, zoology and ecol- 
ogy. Faculty with competencies in these and related disciplines are available as 
advisers. 

RESEARCH PROGRAM AT THE OAK RIDGE ASSOCIATED UNIVERSITIES 

North Carolina State University is one of the sponsoring institutions of the Oak 
Hidge Associated Universities at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Through this cooperative 
association. North Carolina State's graduate research program has at its disposal the 
facilities and research staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Extensive research 
programs are under way there on physical and biological effects of radiation, radio- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 27 



isotope utilization and many other areas of nuclear science and aigineering. When 
master's and doctoral candidates have completed their resident work, it may be 
possible, by special arrangment, for them to do their thesis research at Oak Ridge 
National Laboratory. In addition, it is possible for the staff members of this Univer- 
sity to go to Oak Ridge for advanced study in their particular fields. 

Other Programs 

THE TRIANGLE UNIVERSITIES CONSORTIUM ON AIR POLLUTION 

Controlling the quality of the air we breathe is clearly recognized as one of the 
major problems facing man in the decades ahead. This concern has been expressed 
as a statement of national policy. 

The Triangle Universities (North Carolina State University at Raleigh, Univer- 
sity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University at Durham) took a major 
step in 1970 to make North Carolina an international center for research and train- 
ing in air pollution control with the creation of the Triangle Universities Consor- 
tium on Air Pollution (TUCAP). Adding focus to their effort was the proximity of 
the two national agencies most immediately concerned — the OfBce of Air Programs 
of the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Institute of Environ- 
mental Health Sciences. Both are located within the Research Triangle. 

The Consortium is the first of its kind in the country. It has brought together 
institutions with long experience in working together on common problems and 
interests. A pool of talent and resources that could cover all facets of the national 
problem has been made available. From biology to ecology, fi"om law to medicine, 
fi-om engineering to economics, specialized knowledge has been brought together 
to provide the research and training needed by both the state and the nation. 

TUCAP has already sponsored several conferences and symposia, developed 
joint instructional programs and stimulated considerable faculty involvement in air 
pollution related research on the three campuses. Significant funding for TUCAP 
has been provided through EPA. 



Assistance in computer programming is offered students of statistics 
or biomathematics. 





Major fields of specialization for chemistry majors are analytic, inorganic, organic, 
nuclear and physical chemistry. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Admissions 

Students of all races and sexes are equally welcome at North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. All people may apply for and accept admission, confidait that the policy 
and regular practices of the University will be administered without discrimination. 

Graduate School admission may be to full, provisional or unclassified status. Ap- 
plications for admission to the Graduate School at North Carolina State Universitv 
must be accompanied by official transcripts fi-om all colleges or universities pre- 
viously attended and should be received no later than one month before the start of 
the session in which enrollment is planned. 

A non-refundable application fee of 810 must be submitted with the application 
for admission to the Graduate School. 

Since the Graduate Catalog is prepmed to cover a two-vear period, chiuiges ma\' 
occur during this period which are not included herein. In the event of such 
changes, the schools and departments concerned will commiuiicate with appliciuits 
at the time that the application forms are received. 

It is the prerogative of each school or department to require evidence of aca- 
demic potential beyond those stated specifically in the catalog. 

judgments concerning admission or denial to particular degree prognuns iuid the 
criteria used for admission are initiated in the individual departments iuid schools. 
These criteria and judgments vary according to departments and schools and re- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 29 



fleet not only estimates of ability of students to do graduate work but also the abil- 
ity of the department to absorb additional graduate students. 

When application forms, transcripts and reference forms arrive in the Graduate 
Office they are forwarded, as they arrive, to the department indicated as that in 
which the student hopes to major. Departments vary in the mechanisms used for 
evaluating an applicant's chances for success in graduate work, but in most cases 
the final decision rests with an "admissions committee." In due course a depart- 
ment forwards its recommendation to the Graduate Office. Most departments act 
on applications as received but some departments accumulate applications and 
make their decisions as to admission at certain fixed times during the year, such as 
March 1 or April 1. 

Application forms, transcripts and reference forms should be directed to Dean of 
the Graduate School, 104 Peele Hall, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, 
N. C. 27607. 

FULL GRADUATE STANDING 

For admission in this category a student must have a bachelor's degree fi-om a 
recognized college or university regarded as standard by a regional or general 
accrediting agency, and must have at least a "B" grade average in his undergradu- 
ate major. 

PROVISIONAL ADMISSION 

Provisional admission may be granted to applicants who lack undergraduate 
work considered essential for graduate study in the major field. Course work, with- 
out graduate credit, will be required to make up such deficiencies before admission 
to full graduate status can be granted. 

Graduates from nonaccredited institutions may be granted provisional admission 
when their academic records warrant this status. Additional course work will be 
required of such students when deficiencies in their previous training are apparent. 

Graduates fi-om accredited institutions whose scholastic records are below the 
standards for admission to full graduate standing may be admitted provisionally 
when unavoidable extenuating circumstances affected their undergraduate aver- 
ages or when progressive improvement in their undergraduate programs warrants 
provisional admission. All such students are required to take the Graduate Record 
Examination and to submit scores to the Graduate School office in support of their 
application." The National Teacher Examination may be substituted for the Grad- 
uate Record Examination if recommended by the department head. Information as 
to the dates on which the Graduate Record and the National Teacher Examinations 
are given may be obtained at the Graduate School office. 

Many departments, although not normally requiring GRE scores, may in special 
instances require their submission as additional information to assist in making a 



* Most of the advanced degree-granting departments in the University strongly encouragre submis- 
sion of Graduate Record Examination scores. The following departments will not act on an application 
unless it is accompanied by GRE scores: biomathematics, English, entomology, fiber and polymer sci- 
ence, guidance and personnel services, history, industrial and technical education (vocational indus- 
trial education and industrial arts education), mathematics, plant pathology, politics, psychology (re- 
quires the Advanced Test and Miller Analog^ies as well), sociology, textile chemistry (aptitude and ad- 
vanced test in chemistry), textile technology (aptitude only) and zoology. 



30 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



judgment as to a student's chances of success in a graduate program. 

Although some departments in the School of Education might consider the re- 
sults of the National Teacher Examination as a basis for admission to the master's 
degree program, the Graduate Record Examination scores are required in all de- 
partments in the School of Education in the case of applicants for admission to doc- 
toral programs. 

Graduate students admitted to provisional status are not eligible for appointment 
to graduate assistantships or fellowships. They may attain full graduate standing 
when the deficiencies responsible for their provisional status are corrected. They 
also must have maintained a satisfactory academic record in all course work taken 
as part of their graduate program. Change from provisional to full graduate stand- 
ing is effected only on written recommendation fi-om the department in which the 
student is seeking his degree. 

UNCLASSIFIED GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Unclassified graduate students are not candidates for graduate degrees. They 
may take courses for graduate credit but may not apply more than 10 credits earn- 
ed while in the unclassified status to any program leading to an advanced degree at 
this institution. Unclassified graduate students are expected to meet the same ad- 
missions requirements that apply to graduate students in full standing. 

Applications for admission to the Graduate School should be on file in the Grad- 
uate School office at least 30 days in advance of the registration date for the term 
in which the student wishes to enroll in the Graduate School. 



GRADUATE -CERTIFICATE RENEWAL 

Public school personnel (primary teachers, secondary teachers or administrators) 
registering at North Carolina State for the first time who are interested primarily in 
"Certification Credit" may enroll as graduate students for a maximum of six semes- 
ter hours without forwarding official transcripts of previous work to the Graduate 
Office. If, however, application is not made through normal channels for graduate 
credit in the session in which the course or couises are taken, the student will not 
be permitted to apply the credit toward an advanced degree at North Carolina 
State, or elsewhere. 

In all cases where the teacher's interest is primarily in approval for certification 
credit, the School of Education will be responsible for assessing the adequacy of the 
teacher's qualifications for enrollment in the University in the particular course or 
courses. The School of Education will also be responsible for advising all such stu- 
dents early in each school session that if they wish their credits to be applied in due 
course to a higher degree at North Carolina State, or elsewhere, normal admission 
procedures will be required. 

All teachers who have previously attended North Carolina State University and 
earned six semester hours of credit and wish to enroll for additional courses for 
graduate credit will be required to make application for admission to the Graduate 
School in the usual manner. 

In all cases a "B" level of academic performance or better is required. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 31 



GRADUATE-SPECIAL 

This classification is used primarily for individuals located in the Raleigh area 
who may be considering pursuing a graduate degree in due course but who have, 
as yet, not been admitted to a graduate program. 

The following rules apply to students registered as graduate-special: 

1. All must have at least a baccalaureate degree fi-om an accredited institution 
of higher learning; 

2. Official transcripts need not be submitted to the Graduate OflBce for enroll- 
ment in this classification but instructors are expected to make certain that 
students have adequate preparation for the course(s) contemplated. Students 
are encouraged to seek advisement from the appropriate department before 
registering; 

3. Placement in this classification carries with it no implication that students 
will be admitted to the Graduate School in any of the other classifications; 

4. Graduate credit will be allowed, not to exceed six hours (or nine hours under 
special circumstances) of course work at the 500- or 600-level; 

5. If the student is in due course admitted to the Graduate School, graduate 
credit obtained under this classification may apply to an advanced degree, if 
in the judgment of the advisory committee the course(s) is germane to the 
particular program of work, and performance was at an adequate level; 

6. Students who have received as many as six hours of graduate credit under 
this classification must make application for admission to the Graduate 
School before permission will be granted to enroll for additional graduate 
work. (Permission may be granted to take a third course if recommended by 
the graduate administrator of the department in which the student plans to 
major. ) 

Registration 

The Office of Registration must have written authorization from the dean of the 
Graduate School before any graduate student will be given a permit to register. 
This authorization will be sent to the Office of Registration by the graduate deah at 
the time the student is notified of his acceptance. 

REGISTRATION FOR COURSES AT OTHER CAMPUSES 
OF THE CONSOLIDATED UNIVERSITY 

Graduate students working toward an advanced degree at North Carolina State 
University may find it desirable to enroll for certain courses in one of the other 
campuses of the University (see page 17). The following principles and proce- 
dures apply in such cases: 

1. A graduate student shall be considered to remain in the Graduate School of 
the campus of the University to which admitted for a specific degree pro- 
gram, to be under the control of his department, to be advised by his depart- 
ment and to be enrolled by that Graduate School for any graduate work 



32 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

which he may take for credit in his own campus or any other campus of the 
University. 

2. A graduate student at one campus of the University who is taking work at 
some other campus of the University for credit toward his degree at the Uni- 
versity campus to which he has been admitted shall be enrolled for all cour- 
ses, including those at the other campus of the University, in his home Grad- 
uate School. This Graduate School shall consider courses taken at the other 
campus of the University as a part of the student's normal load and shall use 
such enrollment in computing the total billing which the home University 
will make to the student. 

3. A student at one campus of the University who is by this method enrolled in 
one or more graduate courses at some other campus of the University will be 
admitted to these courses, provided space exists in these classes, by the Grad- 
uate School of the other campus upon normal notification by the Graduate 
School of the student's campus that the student has been properly enrolled 
for these courses and has the approval of the home campus for this program 
of study. 

4. During the summer sessions, approval of the courses to be taken shall be 
asked, but the billing procedures shall be those regularly used for visiting 
students. 

5. No student enrolled as a regular graduate student in any campus of the Uni- 
versity shall be admitted to courses at another campus of the University with- 
out the presentation by the student of written permission fi-om the Graduate 
School of the campus to which the student was originally admitted. 

6. The graduate programs of students enrolled at North Carolina State Univer- 
sity are under the jurisdiction of the Graduate School of North Carolina State 
University. 

PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

All regularly enrolled graduate students must take a physical examination pre- 
ferably given by the family physician, with the results recorded on forms provided 
by the University. When this is not done the examination may be given by the 
North Carolina State physician during registration for a fee of $10. 

COURSE LOAD 

A full-time graduate load is considered to be nine to 15 credits per semester (in- 
cluding audits). This course load restriction is made so that graduate students may 
have time for reading and contemplation well beyond the limits set for satisfactory 
undergraduate work. In exceptional cases one or two additional credit hours may 
be added to the roster if necessary in order to get prerequisite work not taught in 
subsequent terms, provided the corresponding adjustment in course load is made in 
the other terms. Rosters with additional credit hours beyond 15 should be accom- 
panied by a special note from the head of the major department indicating the rea- 
sons for the additional work. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



33 



Full-time faculty of instructor rank and above and other full-time employees of 
the University who hold membership in the Teachers' and State Employees' Retire- 
ment System may register for credit or audit one course in each semester and one 
course during one of the two summer sessions. A maximum of eight semester hours 
may be taken during the academic year. 

Employees having academic rank higher than that of instructor may register for 
graduate work for credit to be transferred to other institutions, but they may not 
undertake programs for graduate degrees at North Carolina State University. 

Graduate assistants on half-time appointments are permitted a maximum course 
load of nine credits per semester unless corresponding adjustments are made in 
their service obligations during the same semester. If the appointment is for the 
academic year of nine months, half-time assistants are restricted to a maximum of 
18 credit hours of work during the nine months of their appointment. Half-time 
graduate assistants whose ^pointments are for 12 months may not exceed a total of 
24 credits during the 12-month period of their appointment. Three-quarter time 
graduate assistants whose appointments are for 12 months may register for a total 
of 16 credits during the calendar year. A total of six credits is the maximum load in 
a regular semester. 

A member of the North Carolina State senior class may, upon approval of the 
dean of the Graduate School, register for courses in the 500 group for graduate cre- 
dit to fill a roster of studies not to exceed 15 credits in any semester. No more than 
six hours of graduate credit may be acquired by an undergraduate student and the 
credits associated with courses approved for graduate credit may not apply toward 
the requirements for the bachelor's degree. Courses listed with numbers in the 600 
series are not ordinarily open to undergraduates. Occasional exceptions may be 
made for "honor" students. 



Continving graduate students who pre- 
register for the coming semester re- 
ceive course schedules and billing by 
mail. 




34 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Tuition and Fees 

SEMESTER RATES 
For Academic Year 1973-74 and 1974-75 

RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA NONRESIDENTS 







REQUIRED 


REQUIRED 


HOURS 


TUITION 


FEES 


TOTAL 


HOURS TUITION FEES 


TOTAL 


1-3 


$ 40.00 


$114.75 


$154.75 


1-3 $300.00 $114.75 


$ 414.75 


4-6 


80.00 


114.75 


194.75 


4-6 600.00 114.75 


714.75 


7 or 








7 or 




more 


120.00 


114.75 


234.75 


more 900.00 114.75 


1,014.75 








REQUIRED FEES 








General Academic 


$ 38.00 








Medical 




15.00 








Athletic 




10.00 








Special 




51.75 





$114.75 

Eligibility of a non-resident for reduced tuition rates. Under certain conditions, stu- 
dents who have been solicited for a "special talent" and have been offered an 
assistantship, traineeship, or fellowship, may be eligible for reduced tuition. 

Application fee. A nonrefundable application fee of $10 dollars is required to ac- 
company each application for admission. 

SPECIAL REGISTRATIONS AND FEES 

Thesis Preparation Only: (GR 598 or GR 698) 

In-Residence ($20.25 plus $114.75 fees) $135.00 

Not-In-Residence ($20.25 plus $7.00 registration fee) 27.25 

Dissertation Research: (GR 697) 

In-Residence ($20.25 plus $114.75 fees) 135.00 

Not-In-Residence ($20.75 plus $7.00 registration fee) 27.25 

Examination Only: (GR 597) 

In-Residence ($10.75 plus $114.75 fees) 125.50 

Not-In-Residence ($10.75 plus $7.00 registration fee) 17.75 

Audits: Registered and paying for other course work- 
one audit free 

Not registered for other course work- 
rates same as for credit 

Full-time Faculty or Staff 7.00 

Microfilming Doctoral Dissertation 21.00 

Incidental fees and charges are levied for purposes and services available to all 
graduate students whether or not the student takes advantage of them. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 35 



The full amount of incidental fees and charges will be collected, notwithstanding 
the number of semester hours of credit for which the student may enroll. 

In cases of occasional or part-time graduate students not in residence, application 
for cancellation of nonacademic fees may be made if it is clear that the student 
could not use the services covered. Application forms are available in the Graduate 
School and the Office of Business Affairs. 

Full-time faculty of instructor rank and above and other full-time employees of 
the University who hold membership in the Teachers' and State Employees' Re- 
tirement System may register for credit or audit one course in each semester and 
one course during one of the two summer terms with free tuition privileges. Free 
tuition privileges apply only during the period of one's employment and do not in- 
clude other charges such as registration, laboratory or other appropriate fees. Thus, 
a nine-month employee is not entitled to free tuition privileges in summer terms 
unless anployed during the session for which free tuition is sought. Each applicant 
for free tuition privileges must complete and subanit through regular administration 
channels a form provided by the University. 

Faculty members on less than full-time appointments will be permitted to take 
more than one course per semester upon the recommendation of their dean and the 
approval of the dean of the Graduate School. In these cases, tuition and fees will be 
the same as those for part-time graduate students computed at resident rates. 

Maximum permissible course loads for graduate students holding part-time ap- 
pointments are as follows: three-quarters time, six hours; half-time, nine hours; 
quarter-time, twelve hours. 

Students wishing to visit classes without participation in class discussions, 
quizzes or examinations must register for this privilege as auditors. Visiting classes 
without registration is not permitted. Graduate students may register for one course 
as an audit in any semester without charge when the audit is certified by the dean 
of the Graduate School as a part of course work for which tuition charges are made 
(this does not apply in the summer sessions). 

Graduate students often mistakenly assume that registration for an audit carries 
with it the privilege of irregular or infrequent attendance. This is not correct. When 
audits are recommended by departmental advisers or appear on the student's plan 
of work, regular attendance is expected as in courses taken for credit. Failure to 
attend on a regular basis will be so noted on the student's permanent record. 

Audits in subjects in which the student has had no previous experience will be 
evaluated at full credit value in determining course loads. Audits taken as repeti- 
tion of work previously accomplished are considered at one-half their credit value 
in calculating course loads. With the single exception of foreign language audits, all 
audit registrations must fall within the maximum permissible course loads. Audits 
are not permitted for students registering for thesis preparation. While audit regis- 
trations are evaluated for purposes of determining permissive course loads in terms 
of the above regulations of the Graduate School, the Office of Business Affairs con- 
siders all audits excepting the one permitted free of charge, in terms of full credit 
value in calculating the graduate student's tuition. 

Dissertation Research: A Ph.D. student whose program of work specifies no formal 
courses during a given semester or summer session, who has successfully pass- 
ed his preliminary examinations, completed at least six hours of departmental 



36 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



research on his Ph.D. program and who is devoting full time to his dissertation 
research shall register for "dissertation research" or an appropriate research 
course offered by the department. A graduate student so registered will be 
classified as a full-time student. "Dissertation research" as is the case for "the- 
sis preparation" will have no credit hour designation. Tuition and fee charges 
for "dissertation research" are the same as those for "thesis preparation." 

Thesis Preparation: Graduate students who have completed all course work, re- 
search and residence requirements and who are writing a thesis or dissertation 
may register for "thesis preparation." The tuition charge for this registration is 
$20.25. Students registering for thesis preparation will pay, in addition, fees 
of $114.75 per semester. When not in residence these charges will be $20.25 
plus $7.00 registration fee or $27.25. 

Examination Only: Graduate students in master's programs not requiring a thesis, 
who have completed all requirements except the final oral examination by the 
beginning of the semester in which the degree is to be awarded, will be re- 
quired to register for "examination only." The tuition charge for this registra- 
tion is $10.75. Students registering for "examination only" will pay, in addi- 
tion, fees of $114.75 per semester. When not in residence these charges 
will be $10.75 plus $7.00 registration fee or $17.75. 
Other Fees: A fee of $21.00 is charged all doctoral candidates for microfilming 
their dissertations. 
Anyone who feels a mistake has been made in his bill may discuss the matter 
with the Office of Business Affairs. Any further appeals should be made to the 
Committee on Refund of Fees. Forms for this appeal may be obtained from the Of- 
fice of Business Affairs. 

All tuition charges and fees are subject to change without notice. 



TUITION AND FEES FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS"— SEMESTER RATE 

1973-74 



RESIDENTS OF NORTH CAROLINA 



NONRESIDENTS 





REQUIRED 




REQUIRED 


HOURS 


TUITION FEES TOTAL 


HOURS 


TUITION FEES TOTAL 


1-3 


$40.00 $12.50 $ 52.50 


1-3 


$300.00 $12.50 $312.50 


4-6 


80.00 25.00 105.00 


4-6 


600.00 25.00 625.00 


7 or 




7 or 




more 


Cannot be classified as 


more 


Cannot be classified as part- 




part-time if enrolled for 




time if enrolled for more than 




more than six (6) hours. 




six (6) hours. 



* Part-time students are defined as persons who are primarily employed (full-time and permanent), 
registered for not more than six (6) hours during the regular semester as incidental students. Part- 
time students must complete an "Application for Cancellation of Nonacademic Fees" form each sem- 
ester to qualify for the reduced rates. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 37 

FEES FOR SUMMER SCHOOL 

1973 1974 

Registration Fee $27.00 $35.00 

Tuition (in-state students per credit hour) 10.00 10.75 

Tuition (out-of-state students per credit hour) 50.50 50.50 

Audits (same as for credit) 

REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES 

A student who withdraws from school on or before the first two weeks of a sem- 
ester will receive a refund of the full amount paid less an enrollment fee. After the 
period specified, refunds may be obtained only by submitting a petition to the Re- 
fund of Fees Committee, which endeavors to protect the rights of the student and 
the University. The committee is empowered to approve a petition when the with- 
drawal is caused by extensive illness and upon the advice of a physician, military 
orders, or when circumstances justify waiving the rules. For information, contact 
William R. Styons, Director of Student Accounts, "B" Holladay Hall, North Caro- 
lina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 27607. 

RESIDENCE STATUS 

Until May of 1973, determination of a student's residence status for tuition pur- 
poses rested upon the easily administered statutory requirement that "a legal resi- 
dent must have maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at least 12 months 
next preceding the date of enrollment or re-enrollment in an institution of higher 
education in this State," with the express proviso that "student status in an insti- 
tution of higher learning in this State shall not constitute eligibility for residence to 
qualify said student for in-state tuition" (G.S. 116-143.1, 1971) (emphasis added). 
The administrative consequence of this law was to make necessary, in most cases, 
only one inquiry concerning residence status for each student, at the outset of the 
higher education experience, since time spent enrolled as a student could not be 
counted in satisfaction of the 12-month ehgibility requirement. 

The 1973 Session of the General Assembly amended the applicable law, so as to 
read in pertinent part as follows: 

"(b) To qualify for in-state tuition a legal resident must have maintained his 
domicile in North Carolina for at least the 12 months immediately prior to his class- 
ification as a resident for tuition purposes. In order to be eligible for such classifica- 
tion, the individual must establish that his or her presence in the State during such 
12-month period was for purposes of maintaining a bona fide domicile rather than 
for purposes of merely temporary residence incident to enrollment in an institution 
of ligher education; fijrther, (1) if the parents (or court -appointed legal guardian) 
of the individual seeking resident classification are (is) bona fide domicilaries of this 
State, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of domiciliary status of the individual 
applicant and (2) if such parents or guardian are not bona fide domiciliaries of this 
State, this fact shall be prima facie evidence of non-domicihary status of the indivi- 
dual." (University regulations concerning the classification of students by residence, 
for purposes of applicable tuition diflFerentials, are set forth in detail in A Manual to 
Assist The Public Higher Education Institutions of North Carolina in the Matter of 



38 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Student Residence Classification for Tuition Purposes. Each enrolled student is 
responsible for knowing the contents of that Manual, which is the controlling 
administrative statement of policy on this subject. Copies of the Manual are 
available on request at the Admissions Office, 112 Peele Hall, North Carolina State 
University.) 

The essential change effected by the 1973 amendment to this statute is that a 
person who is an enrolled student is no longer necessarily precluded from demon- 
strating during the period of his enrollment that he in fact has become a legal resi- 
dent of North Carolina entitled to the in-state tuition rate. The administrative con- 
sequences of this modification of the law are substantial. Two inquiries are man- 
dated by the statute. First, has the applicant for classification as a legal resident in 
fact resided in North Carolina for a minimum period of twelve months immediately 
prior to the proposed effective date of his classification as a resident for tuition pur- 
poses? Second, during the twelve-month period in question, did the applicant's 
presence in the State constitute legal residence? Thus, a carefially detailed inquiry 
must be made in each such case concerning the residential status of the applicant, 
as measured by established legal principles which control the disposition of ques- 
tions about the place of legal residence of an individual. 

CLASSIFICATION PROCEDURES 

A. Initial Classification— A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution 
(or permitted to re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program 
which involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment) shall be classified by the ad- 
mitting institution either as a resident or as a nonresident, for tuition purposes, 
prior to actual matriculation. Particular officials or offices of the institution shall be 
designated to evaluate all such initial classification cases and to assign an appropri- 
ate classification consistent with the requirements of State law and the provisions of 
this manual. Basic data on which such assignment shall be based shall be collected 
in accordance with the common informational form prescribed herein (see Appen- 
dix B of Residence Manual, 1973, NCSU); additional data or documentation deem- 
ed essential to a reliable determination may be elicited from the student, as deemed 
appropriate by the responsible official or office. 

B. Subsequent Classification Inquiries. Reclassification— A residaitial classifica- 
tion once assigned (and confirmed pursuant to any appellate process invoked) may 
be changed thereafter only at intervals corresponding with the established primary 
divisions of the academic calendar of the institution, viz., at the beginning of a sem- 
ester, quarter, or otherwise denominated basic interval of the academic calendar. 
No change in residential status for tuition purposes (and thus no change in appli- 
cable billing rates) shall be effected during such a semester, quarter, or term, with 
resulting increases or decreases in the tuition obligation on a pro rata basis for a 
portion of such semester, quarter, or term. 

The institution shall provide to each student at the time of and in connection 
with the transmission to him of each periodic bill for tuition charges a notice of the 
circumstances under which and the time at which a change in classification may 
occur. The notice shall be of the type prescribed in Appendix C of the Residence 
Manual, July 1973, NCSU. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 39 



Fellowships aiid Graduate Assistant ships 

FELLOWSHIPS 

Graduate fellowships and traineeships provide funds to graduate students to 
assist in the support of their programs of advanced study. Holders of fellowships 
have no service obligation to the University and may devote full time to their grad- 
uate programs. 

Some of the agencies sponsoring fellowships at North Carolina State University 
are the Agency for International Development, Aluminum Company of America, 
the Atomic Energy Commission, Chemstrand, Douglas Aircraft Company, Dow 
Chemical Company, DuPont Company, E. Sigurd Johnson, Eastman Kodak Com- 
pany, Ford Foundation, General Electric Foundation, General Food Corporation, 
Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, Interna- 
tional Institute of Education, Kellogg, National Aeronautics and Space Administra- 
tion, National Institutes of Health, National Lumber Manufacturing Association, 
National Science Foundation, North Carolina Chapter of the Soil Conservation 
Society of America (Hugh Hammond Bennett Fellowship), North Carolina Grange 
(E. G. Moss Fellowship), North Carolina Textile Foundation, Office of Education 
(Department of Health, Education and Welfare), Phillips Petroleum Cx)mpany, 
Public Health Service (U.S.), R. |. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Research Corpora- 
tion, Rockefeller Foundation, Scholler Foundation, Shell Companies Foundation, 
U.S. Office of Education and Wachovia Bank and Trust Company. 

Information relative to stipends, areas of research study supported by specific 
fellowships and application forms may be obtained from the Graduate School or 
from the heads of the appropriate departments. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS 

Graduate assistantships are granted to selected students who normally devote 
half time to service duties for the University. Teaching assistantships carry stipends 
ranging from $2,900 to $4,600 for the academic year, depending on experience, 
and permit the holder to enroll for 60 percent of a full course load. The stipends for 
research assistantships range to $5,200 for a calendar year appointment, depending 
on experience. 

The University offers 823 assistantships requiring a service obligation in either 
teaching or research. Some of these are supported by funds granted by the follow- 
ing agencies: the Agency for International Development, Air Force Cambridge 
Research Laboratories, Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Akzona, Amerikan 
Enka, the American Museum of Natural History, Amos Johnson Grant, Army Mis- 
sile Command, Army Research Office (Durham), the Atomic Energy Commission, 
Best Foods, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Campbell Soup Company, the Chil- 
ean Nitrate Education Bureau, Inc., Cotton, Inc., Eastman Kodak, Gerber Products 
Company, Graham Manufacturing Company, Hercules Powder Company, Depart- 
ment of Labor, the Lilliston Implement Company, The Lilly Company, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration, E. I. DuPont de Nemours and Company. 

National Institutes of Health, National Knitwear Manufacturers Association, Na- 
tional Science Foundation, North Carolina Agricultural Foundation, North Caro- 



40 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



lina Board of Science and Technology, North Carohna Dairy Foundation, North 
Carohna Milk Commission, North Carolina Motor Carriers Association, North Car- 
olina Soybean Producers Association, Owens-Corning Fiberglass Corporation, Pa- 
cific Coast Borax Company, Peanut Growers Association, the Petroleum Research 
Fund of the American Chemiciil Society, Pulp and Paper Foundation, Inc., R. ]. 
Reynolds Tobacco Company, the Ralston-Purina Company, the Solvay Process Di- 
vision of Allied Chemical Company, Sherwin-Williams Foundations, Southeastern 
Association of Game and Fish Commissions, the Tennessee Corporation, Southern 
Forest Institute, The Union Camp Corporation, U.S. Department of the Interior, 
U.S. OfiBce of Education, U.S. Public Health Service, and the Water Resources 
Research Institute. 

Students interested in applying for a fellowship or assistantship mav indicate 
their interest on the application forms submitted. 

Other Financial Aid 

NATIONAL DIRECT STUDENT LOANS 
(Formerly National Defense Student Loans) 

Graduate students who are .\merican citizens may apply to the Financial Aid Of- 
fice for consideration for long term, low interest loans. To qualify for loans students 
must be making satisfactory academic progress and must show financial need. Stu- 
dents are expected to apply for and to accept any aviiilable assistantships before 
applying for loans. 

Graduate students may borrow up to $10,000 inclusive of any undergraduate 
National Direct Student (National Defense Student) Loans. There is no interest on 
the loan while the borrower is a full- or half-time student at an institution of higher 
education. Nine months after ceasing to be at least a hiUf-time student, interest be- 
gins at three percent per year. The repayment period begins at the same time. A 
ten year repayment period is possible for large indebtedness; however, a minimum 
payment of $30 per month is required. Interest does not accrue and repavment in- 
stallments may be postponed during any period not in excess of three years during 
which the borrower is a member of the Armed Forces of the United States or is a 
Peace Corps or Vista volunteer. Reduction of obhgations to repay may result fi-om 
teaching in schools with high concentrations of low income families or from teach- 
ing handicapped children. Military service qualifies for cancellation as follows: If, 
after June 30, 1972, the loan maker serves as a member of the .\rmed Forces of the 
United States, up to 50 per cent of the principal amount of this loan shall be re- 
duced at the rate of 12^2 per cent of the total principal amount of the loan, plus 
interest thereon, for each complete year of service in an area of hostilities that qual- 
ifies for special pay under section 310 of Title 37, United States Code. 

Institutional Long Term Loans: These loans are made from University funds. Insti- 
tutional loans are made and are to be repaid under the siime terms as the Na- 
tional Direct Student Loans except that there are no forgiveness features. 

Insured Loan Program: This program provides loans from private lenders. Proce- 
dures are different in each state. Information and applications for available 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 41 

loans may be obtained in the Financial Aid Office. Interest is at seven percent 
per vear with the Federal Government paying the interest during the in- 
school period for students who qualify because of the financial circumstances 
of their families. 
North Carolina legal residents enrolled full-time may borrow through College 
Foundation up to $1,250 per semester for a total of $2,500 per academic year for an 
aggregate of $10,000 for all enrollment including Graduate School. College Foun- 
dation Loans are insured by the North Carolina Education Assistance Authority or 
the United States Office of Education and under certain conditions the Office of 
Education pays the seven percent interest duiing the in-school and grace periods. 
Students fiom other states may obtain information about similar plans. 

PART-TIME JOBS 

The College Work Study Program is a federal program designed to guarantee 
part-time jobs to students who show need of financial assistance. The same applica- 
tion is used to apply for loans and jobs. Effort is made to assign students to jobs in 
keeping with their special interests and skills. 

Other jobs not based on need are listed at the Financial Aid Office, and are open 
to all students. 
SHORT-TERM EMERGENCY LOANS 

Loans, usually in amounts of $100 or less, to meet emergency expenses may be 
obtained on short notice at the Financial Aid Office. Repayment periods are from 
30 to 60 days. 

Military Education and Training 

The Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) selects interested L^niversity stu- 
dents who are to be enrolled in Military Science (Army ROTC) or in Aerospace 
Studies (Air Force ROTC) for officer education and training leading toward a com- 
mission. 

The Army and Air Force ROTC departments educate and train University stu- 
dents, graduate and undergraduate, for a commission in their respective military 
services. These students must have four full semesters (undergraduate or graduate) 
remaining at the time they enter the ROTC program. Uniforms for Army and Air 
Force ROTC are provided by the University from funds made available by the 
Federal Government. Transfer credit is allowed for work at other institutions hav- 
ing an ROTC unit. 

Qualified male graduate students may elect either a two-year or four-year pro- 
gram of Army ROTC studies. Female participation is currently limited to the four- 
yeai- program. Additional information concerning either program can be obtained 
at the Department of Military Science in Room 154 of the Reynolds Coliseum. 

To enroll for the two years of the AFROTC program, students must qualify on 
the Air Force Officer Qualification Test, meet physical requirements, and com- 
plete a six-week field training course during the summer just prior to entry into the 
program. This training h conducted at one of several Air Force bases in the 
United States. There he or she will receive the education and training comparable 



42 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



to those students who have been in the four-year program. The student must com- 
plete the progriun and obtain a commission before reaching the .30th birthday. 

Those students who will be under 26)2 years of age upon commissioning and can 
pass physical and mentiU exams may elect to enter the AFROTC program as pilot 
or navigator candidates. Students selected for pilot training receive 35 hours of 
flying instruction and ground school education which can lead to a FAA Private 
Pilot's License before commissioning. Details can be obtiiined from the Aerospace 
Studies Department in Reynolds Coliseum, Room 145. 

For those graduate students quiilifying for admission to the Advanced ROTC 
course of instruction, a monthly subsistence allowance of $100 will be paid during 
the fall and spring semester. A limited number of students may be selected for 
ROTC scholaiships. These scholarships pay all tuition, fees, costs of required text- 
books and a tax-free subsistence allowance of $100 per month paid during regular 
semesters to all students in the last two years of the program. 



Housing 

North Carolina State University strives to provide suitable accommodations for 
its students. The University operates 16 residence halls, two of which are coeduca- 
tional, with a housing capacity of 4,093 men and 1,479 women. In addition, 300 
apartments are available for married students. 

The residence halls are operated to provide opportunities through group living 
experiences which will complement and expand the educational experiences of the 
residents. Each hall is staffed with selected students, both graduate and undergrad- 
uate, who are responsible directly to professionally trained people in their area and 
to the Director of Residence Life. The staff members are available to help students 

McKimmon Village for married students includes 300 apartments ranging from 
these efficiencies to one- and two-bedroom apartments. 




THE GRADUATE CATALOG 43 

initiate programs and activities and to advise and assist residents in any way possi- 
ble. 

Living arrangements in buildings vary. Six high-rise buildings are arranged in 
suites of four or five rooms sharing a bath; the other buildings have rooms opening 
on to a central corridor. The rooms are furnished but the residents must provide 
bed linen, pillows and towels. 
ROOM RENTALS 

The rental fee per semester is $147 for men and $158 for women. Reservations 
are made in the order of applications received so long as space is available. Appli- 
cation dates are announced by the Housing Rental Office. These dates are set to al- 
low continuing students to reserve rooms in advance for each semester. Failure to 
vacate a room and/or complete check-out procedure at the end of a rental period 
or on withdrawal fi-om the University will result in a penalty fee. 
ROOM CHANGES 

Once room assignments are made, no room changes will be permitted until the 
beginning of the second week of classes. Room changes are permitted as follows; 

Student request: Approval of the Housing Rental Office is needed and there is a 
$5 room change fee. Residents transferring to other University housing (McKim- 
mon Village, fraternities, greenhouses, or dairy units) will be refunded the rental 
fee paid less the $10 processing fee and a prorated daily charge from the opening 
day of the residence halls until the room is vacated and the keys returned. 

Administratively initiated: No fees are charged. 
REFUND OF ROOM RENT 

A room assignment must be cancelled IN PERSON or IN WRITING at the De- 
partment of Residence Life in Leazar Hall. The effective date of cancellation is the 
date the notification is received in that office. 

The amount of refund, if any, will be determined in accordance with the Refund 
Policy for Residence Halls as stated below: 

1. If the Room Assignment is Cancelled on or Before the Following Dates: 

First Summer Session: May 17, 1974 

Second Summer Session: July 28, 1974 

Fall Semester: July 1, 1974 

Spring Semester: December 15, 1974 

The rental fee paid will be refunded less the $10 processing fee. 

2. If the Room Assignment is Cancelled After the Above Dates: 

A. A refund will be given only if the space is reassigned to a new resident. 
The refund will be the rental fee paid less a $10 processing fee and a pro- 
rated daily charge from the opening day of the residence halls until the 
space is occupied by the NEW resident. (New resident is defined as a stu- 
dent who is a non-resident of a residence hall prior to being assigned to the 
vacated space. ) 

B. If a resident officially withdraws from the University because of Medi- 
cal reasons or Military Orders, the refund will be the rental fee paid less 
the $10 processing fee and a prorated daily charge from the opening day 
of the residence halls until the space is vacated and the keys returned. (It 



44 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



is not necessary for the space to be occupied in order that a refund of room 
rent may be authorized. ) 

ROOM KEYS 

A room key and mailbox key are issued to each student. No deposit is required; 
however, failure to return keys to the floor assistant upon vacating will result in a 
$2.50 charge for each key. Replacement for a lost key will be issued at the Hous- 
ing Rental Office for $2.50. Duplication of a University key is illegal. 
MARRIED STUDENT HOUSING 

Efficiency, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom apartments are available in the mar- 
ried student housing complex. Rent of $50.50, $61.00, and $72.50 respectively 
does not include utilities except in the efficiencies. The University does not operate 
a trailer park, but there are privately owned parks within reasonable distance ot 
campus. For more information contact the Housing Rental Office, Box 5505, N. C. 
State University, Raleigh, N. C. 27607. 

FOOD SERVICES 

Food service is provided at the University Student Center. Cost depends on the 
individual's requirements and the selection of food. A typical student, paying cash 
for each meal, will spend approximately $600 per academic year. 

The Students Supply Stores operate soda fountain snack bars for the conven- 
ience of resident students in five areas. There is an additional snack bar located in 
the Nelson Textile Building. 
LINEN RENTAL SERVICE 

The linen service provides for the initial issue of two sheets, one pillow case and 
three towels. The student may exchange his linen weekly at a cost of $28 per year. 
Pillows may be rented for $L50 per year. A regular blanket may be purchased for 
$5; the N.C. State monogrammed blanket, $7. These services are available to both 
campus and off-campus students. Application may be made in the Auxiliary Ser- 
vices Office in Holladay Hall. 

The Instructional Materials Production Center in the School of Education is used 
for videotaping mock counseling conferences so students can study and improve 
guidance techniques. 



'ZM^.- 



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1 

1 



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THE GRADUATE CATALOG 45 



GRADUATE DEGREES 



Admission to the Graduate School does not constitute admission to candidacy for 
a graduate degree. AppHcation for admission to candidacy for graduate degrees 
must be submitted to the Administrative Board of the Graduate School. Applica- 
tions of students preparing for the master's degree may not be filed before the satis- 
factory completion of one full semester of graduate study and must be presented 
before the end of the first week of the last semester in residence. Approval of the 
application will be determined by the quality of the scholastic record and on the 
certification by the major department that the student is qualified to continue ad- 
vanced work. Admission to candidacy for the doctorate is granted upon satisfactory 
completion of the qualifying or preliminary examinations. 

The Graduate School at North Carolina State University offers work leading to 
the Master of Science degree and the Professional Master's degree in certain spe- 
cialized fields in the Schools of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Design, Education, 
Engineering, Forest Resources, Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Textiles; 
and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in certain fields of agriculture and life sci- 
ences, engineering, forest resources, physical and mathematical sciences and tex- 
tiles. The Doctor of Education degree, providing majors in Adult and Community 
College Education, Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Administration and 
Supervision, Guidance and Personnel Services, Industrial Arts Education and 
Occupational Education is offered in the School of Education. Work leading to 
the Master of Arts degree is offered in economics, English, histoiy and politics. 

A graduate student is expected to familiarize oneself with the requirements for 
the degree for which one is a candidate and is held responsible for the fulfillment of 
these requirements. This applies to the last dates on which theses may be accepted, 
the dates for examinations, the proper form of theses and all other matters regarding 
requirements for degrees. 



Master of Science and Master of Arts Degrees 

The Master of Science degree is awarded by North Carolina State University 
after a student has completed a course of study in a specialized field in agriculture 
and life sciences, education, engineering, forest resources, physical and mathemati- 
cal sciences or textiles, has completed a satisfactory thesis and has taken compre- 
hensive examinations in the chosen field of study. 

A Master of Arts degree is awarded in economics, English, history and politics. 
Candidates for Master of Science or Master of Arts degrees are expected to achieve 
high levels of scholarship. Graduate study is distinguished fi-om undergraduate 
work by its emphasis upon independent rescixrch. The graduate student is more in- 
terested in the significance of facts than in the accumulation of data. He is con- 



46 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



cerned with the materials of learning and the organization and interpretation of 
these materials. 

A graduate student's program of study is planned so as to provide a comprehen- 
sive view of some major field of interest and to furnish the training essential for suc- 
cessful research in this field and related areas of knowledge. As great a latitude is 
permitted in the selection of courses as is compatible with a well-defined major in- 
terest. The progriun of course work is selected with the object of making possible a 
reasonable mastery of the subject matter in a specialized field. Training in research 
is provided to familiarize the student with the methods, ideals and goals of inde- 
pendent investigation. Since there are many possible combinations of courses, the 
administration of graduate programs calls for personal supervision of each student's 
plan of work by a special advisory committee of the graduate faculty. The program 
of course work to be followed by the student as part of the requirements for the 
master's degree, and the thesis problem selected, must be approved by the stu- 
dent's advisory committee, the head of the department and the dean of the Gradu- 
ate School. 

Students are generally discouraged from seeking duplicate graduate degrees. 
CREDITS 

1. For the Master of Science degree or the Master of Arts degree a minimum 
of 30 semester hours is required. 

2. No more than six of the academic credits required for the degree will be 
accepted from other institutions. 

3. No graduate credit will be awarded for excess undergraduate credit from 
another institution. 

4. All work credited toward a master's degree must be completed within six 
calendar years. 

5. No graduate credit is allowed for courses taken by correspondence. 
Normally, a maximum of six semester credits may be obtained in extension study 

in the field of education, provided the extension courses are taught by a member of 
the graduate faculty and provided the courses are given graduate ranking by the 
Graduate School. If a student has been admitted to the Graduate School and an 
approved program of work has been submitted, then six additional semester credits 
may be attained in oflP-campus graduate courses to apply to a minimal 30-hour mas- 
ter's program. Credit for extension courses reduces the amount of credit that may 
be transferred from other institutions. 

The 30 semester hour requirement for the master's degree represents the mini- 
mum quantity of work acceptable. The credit hours required of graduate students 
usually exceed the minimum requirements. Inadequate preparation and thesis re- 
search frequently make additional work necessary. 
COURSES OF STUDY 

In a typical minimal program of 30 hours, at least 20 semester hours must come 
fi-om the 500- and 600-level group with no less than six hours being at the 600 
level. The program of the student may include no more than six hours of research 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 47 



nor more than two hours of departmental seminar unless the total program planned 
exceeds 30 hours. Courses at the 400-level counted toward the minimal 30-hour 
requirement may not ordinarily come from the major field. 

During the first term in residence an advisory committee of at least three faculty 
members, one representing the minor field, will be appointed by the dean, after 
consultation with the head of the major department, for each student engaged in 
a program of work leading to the master's degree. The advisory committee will 
meet with the student and prepare a program of course work to meet the require- 
ments of the student's graduate objectives. Four copies of the program, prepared 
on forms provided for this purpose, must be approved by each member of the 
committee, by the head of the major department and by the dean of the Graduate 
School. After approval in the Graduate Office, three copies will be returned to the 
department head — one for his files, one for the chairman of the advisory committee 
and one for the student. 

The courses taken by a graduate student shall constitute a well-rounded but 
unified plan of study. This means that the program of research and course work 
shall be divided between a major and a minor field. While there are no inflexible 
rules which govern the number of credit hours that must constitute the major and 
minor, in general, it is expected that approximately two-thirds of the course work 
will fall in the major and one-third in the minor. The detailed course requirements 
for each graduate student program are left to the judgment of the advisory com- 
mittee. 
RESIDENCE 

Students engaged in a course of study leading to the Master of Science or Master 
of Arts degree are required to be in residence, pursuing graduate work, one full 
academic year. 
CLASS WORK 

A graduate student is expected to show greater initiative in exploring the possi- 
bilities of the subject matter presented in the courses he takes than is the under- 
graduate. He is also expected to recognize the significance of facts and to assume a 
responsibility for relating data to theoretical concepts. In preparation, attendance 
and in all the routine of class work the graduate student is subject to the regulations 
observed in other divisions of the University. 
GRADES 

A minimum grade of "C" must be made on all formal course work to obtain grad- 
uate credit. An average of "B" must be obtained on all course work taken as part of 
the student's graduate program. Failure to maintain a "B" average will place the 
student on probation. Any student whose academic record fails to meet the "B" 
average requirement for two consecutive terms will not be permitted to continue a 
graduate program without the written approval of the graduate dean. 

Grades in research, seminar and special problems courses are given in terms of 
"S" (satisfactory) or "U" (unsatisfactory) in place of the symbols used for formal 
course work. 

"S" and "U" grades in graduate courses are not used in computing GPA. How- 
ever, in the case of a "U" grade, the student's advisory committee is notified imme- 



48 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



diately and asked to make recommendations. It may recommend (1) a repeat of the 
course, (2) the substitution of another course (with an "S," "A," or "B" grade re- 
quired), or (3) if the course is not needed to fulfill degree requirements and if the 
student has otherwise completed an adequate program, the committee may request 
that no corrective action be taken in the way of course addition or substitution. The 
"U" grade will, however, remain on the record. 

The grade incomplete may be used in research and laboratory courses when cir- 
cumstances beyond the control of the student have prevented completion of the 
work by the end of the academic term. A grade o( incomplete may be given only 
after approval of the graduate dean and must be converted to one of the usual 
symbols before the end of the next academic term in which the student is regis- 
tered. 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

Since this catalog is prepared for a two-year period covering the calendar years 
1974-76 some departments may seek a modification of their language require- 
ments during that period Thus, a student would be well advised to inquire about 
this matter fi-om the department in which he plans to work toward an advanced 
degree. 

A reading knowledge of at least one modern foreign language (Germanic, 
Romance or Slavic) is presently required of candidates for the Master of Arts 
degree in English, history or politics, and by some departments for the Master of 
Science degree. Departments having this requirement are: biomathematics, chem- 
istry, entomology and statistics. The School of Forest Resources and the Depart- 
ments of Guidance and Personnel Services, Sociology and Soil Science leave the 
decision to the student's advisory committee. 

In those instances where the language is required, the requirement must be 
satisfied before a student can be admitted to candidacy. 

Proficiency in languages is determined by the Department of Modern Lan- 
guages: 

1. By traditional reading knowledge examination at any time requested by the 
student. 

2. By taking course work (audit) especially designed for graduate students who 
have no previous knowledge of a foreign language or who wish to refi-esh 
their knowledge. The Department offers one special course in each of the 
three major languages: MLF 401, MLG 401, MLS 401. These courses are 
normally scheduled in the fall. In them, students are asked to learn a basic 
vocabulary and are taught to recognize the structural patterns necessary for 
an understanding of the written language. As the course develops, students 
will get practice in translation based on materials drawn from various sources 
reflecting student interest. In the final examination, students will be tested on 
their ability to translate accuiately and correcdy. A passing grade in the 
course will certify students in the language chosen. Both the couise and the 
examination concentrate exclusively on the ability to understand the written 
word, and do not provide instruction or testing in speaking nor in original 
composition. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 49 



Students whose native language is other than EngHsh may meet the foreign 
language requirement by demonstrating a satisfactory mastery of English. Exami- 
nations in English are conducted by the Department of Modern Languages. 

When only one language is required in a student's program, certification for that 
language must occur on this campus. 
THESIS 

A candidate for the Master of Science or Master of Arts degree must prepare 
a thesis representing an original investigation. The subject of the thesis must be 
approved by the head of the department in which the major work is done and by 
the student's advisory committee. Three copies of the thesis in final form, and 
five copies of the abstract, must be filed in the Graduate Office at least one month 
before the end of the term in which the degree is awarded. Detailed instructions 
as to form and organization of the thesis may be obtained at the Graduate Office. 

EXAMINATIONS 

All candidates for the Master of Science or Master of Arts degree must pass, 
with a grade of "A," "B" or "C," all formal course work specified as part of the 
requirements for the degree. Graduate credit for research, seminar and special 
problems courses is granted when a grade of "S" is recorded in the Registration 
Office. In addition, the candidate must pass a comprehensive oral examination 
that is held to satisfy the examining committee that the candidate possesses a 
reasonable mastery of knowledge in the major and minor fields and that this 
knowledge can be used with promptness and accuracy. This examination may 
not be held until all other requirements, except completing the course work of the 
last semester, are satisfied Application for the comprehensive oral examination 
must be filed with the graduate dean by the chairman of the advisory committee 
at least two weeks prior to the date on which the examination is to be held. 

The oral examination will be conducted by an examining committee appointed 
by the graduate dean. The chairman of the examining committee will be the chair- 
man of the student's advisory committee. At least two additional members will 
be appointed to represent the major and minor fields. The comprehensive oral 
examination is open to all graduate faculty members who care to attend but the 
decision as to the candidate's fitness rests solely with the examining committee. 

At the discretion of the examining committee, written examinations covering 
the subject matter in the major and minor fields also may be required of the 
candidate. Written examinations, when required, normally should not be held 
earlier than the end of the first month of the last semester in residence and not later 
than one week before the comprehensive oral examination. Information as to when 
written examinations are scheduled should be obtained fi-om the appropriate de- 
partments. See Summary of Procedures for the Master's Degree, pages 53-54. 

Master's Degree in a Designated Field 

This degree differs fi-om the Master of Arts or Master of Science degree primarily 
in that course work is substituted for the thesis requirement. Very often this degree 
is sought by students who are interested in a wider variety of courses than can be 



50 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



chosen by a student who wishes research training at the master's level. A student 
may develop a program of study which terminates at the master's level or which 
may lead to further study toward the doctorate degree. 

Following is a listing of the types of degrees that may be awarded upon comple- 
tion of the course of study in a designated field. 
Master of Education (Adult and Community College Education) 
Master of Agriculture 

Master of Education (Agricultural Education) 
Master of Architecture 

Master of Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Master of Biomathematics 
Master of Chemical Engineering 
Master of Civil Engineering 
Master of Economics 

Master of Education (Curriculum and Instruction) 
Master of Education (Educational Administration and Supervision) 
Master of Electrical Engineering 
Master of Engineering Mechanics 
Master of Forestry 

Master of Education (Guidance and Personnel Services) 
Master of Education (Industrial Arts Education) 
Master of Industrial Engineering 
Master of Technology for International Development 
Master of Landscape Architecture 
Master of Life Sciences 

Master of Education (Mathematics Education) 
Master of Mechanical Engineering 
Master of Education (Occupational Education) 
Master of Product Design 
Master of Public Affairs 
Master of Recreation Resources 
Master of Education (Science Education) 
Master of Sociology 

Master of Education (Special Education) 
Master of Statistics 
Master of Textile Technology 
Master of Urban Design 

Master of Education (V^ocational Industrial Education) 
Master of Wildlife Biology 
Master of Wood and Paper Science 
LANGUAGE REQUIREMENTS 

The candidate for a master's degree in a designated field is exempt fi-om the re- 
quirement of a reading knowledge of a modern foreign language. 
THESIS REQUIREMENTS 

In the School of Education the thesis requirement for the master's degree in each 
of the specialized fields may be waived by the department in which the degree is 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 51 

sought. When the thesis requirement is waived the student must complete the 
course "Introduction to Educational Research" or a departmental course in re- 
search, and a problem report. 
OTHER REQUIREMENTS 

Some of these master's programs have special requirements that differ from and 
sometimes exceed minimum requirements of Master of Arts or Master of Science 
degrees. Students are advised to obtain full particulars from the appropriate depart- 
ments. In the main, however, requirements are the same as those for the Master of 
Arts and Master of Science degrees. 

Master of Agriculture Degree and 
Master of Life Sciences Degree 

The requirements for either of these degrees are as follows: 

1. A total of 36 semester hours is required. 

2. A minimum of four semester hours in special problems is required. Not 
more than six semester hours in special problems will be allowed. 
This work replaces the research thesis requirement for the Master of Sci- 
ence or Master of Arts degree. 

3. There are no specific requirements as to courses in the 600 group. 

4. A reading knowledge of a modern foreign language is not required. 

In all other respects the requirements for the Master of Agriculture or the Master 
of Life Sciences degree are the same as those for the Master of Science degree. 

Summary of Procedures for the Master's Degree 
In a Designated Field 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or depart- 
ment head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student by Graduate School. 

3. Receipt of application forms and transcripts by Graduate School. 

4. Application with transcript sent to department head for study. 

5. Department head recommends acceptance of prospective student stating 
curriculum in which he will work and the degree sought. 

6. Assuming the prospective student meets the minimum scholastic standards, 
notice of acceptance is mailed to him by the Graduate School. When the 
student's academic record fails to meet the minimum scholastic standards 
of the Graduate School, provisional admission may be granted upon sub- 
mission by the student of evidence of a satisfactory performance on the 
Graduate Record Examination or National Teacher Examination. The 
National Teacher Examination is accepted only when approved by the 
department head and the graduate dean. 

7. Permit to register is sent by the Graduate School to the registrar. 



62 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



8. Student arrives, reports to the department head, is assigned an adviser and 
makes out a roster of courses in consultation with the departmental adviser. 

9. Advisory committee of three or more faculty members, one of whom re- 
presents the minor field, appointed before the end of the first semester of 
graduate study by the Graduate School after consultation with the depart- 
ment head. If departmental written examinations are required by the major 
department, there may be a minimum of two members on the advisory 
committee (one from the major field and one from the minor). 

10. Plan of work prepared by the advisory committee and submitted in quad- 
ruplicate to the Graduate School by the end of the first semester in resi- 
dence. 

11. Plan of work approved by the graduate dean and three copies returned to 
the department head. One copy is kept in department files, one goes to the 
adviser and one is given to the student. Students preparing themselves for 
the professional degree in specialized fields of education should consult 
the chairmen of their committees with reference to their problem report. 

12. Student applies for admission to candidacy for the master's degree. Applica- 
tion must be filed before the end of the first week of the last semester in 
residence. 

13. Application is reviewed by the head of the major department and by the 
graduate dean and, if approved, the student becomes a candidate for the 
degree. 

14. At the discretion of the advisory committee, written examinations in the 
major and/or minor fields may be required of the candidate. Written exam- 
inations, when required, normally should not be held earlier than the end 
of the first month of the last semester in residence and not later than one 
week before the oral examination. 

15. Permission for the candidate to take the final oral examination is requested 
of the Graduate School at least two weeks before the examination. 

16. Permission is granted by the graduate dean, date is set and examining 
committee appointed. The report on the final examination should be filed 
with the Graduate School as soon as the examination has been completed. 

17. Graduate School certifies to the Registration Office and to the Administra- 
tive Board of the Graduate School that all requirements for the degree have 
been met and recommends the awarding of the degree. 

18. All requirements must be completed within six calendar years. 

19. Student must be registered in semester or session in which degree is to 
be awarded unless one has completed all requirements for the degree, in- 
cluding the passing of the final oral examination, by the first day of classes 
in the term in which the degree is to be awarded. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 53 

Summary of Procedures for the Master of Science Degree and 
the Master of Arts Degree 

1. Letter of inquiry fi-om prospective student to Graduate School or depart- 
ment head. 

2. Maihng of proper forms to student by Graduate School. 

3. Receipt of application form and transcript by Graduate School. 

4. Application with transcript sent to department head for study. 

5. Department head recommends acceptance of prospective student stating 
curriculum in which he will work and the degree sought. 

6. Assuming the prospective student meets the minimum scholastic standards, 
notice of acceptance is mailed to him by the Graduate School. When the 
student's academic record fails to meet the minimum scholastic standards 
of the Graduate School, provisional admission may be granted upon submis- 
sion by the student of evidence of a satisfactory performance on the Gradu- 
ate Record Examination or National Teacher Examination. The National 
Teacher Examination is accepted only when approved by the department 
head and the graduate dean. 

7. Permit to register is sent by the Graduate School to the registrar. 

8. Student arrives, reports to the department head, is assigned an adviser and 
makes out a roster of couises in consultation with department adviser. 

9. Advisory committee of three or more faculty members, one of whom repre- 
sents the minor field, appointed before the end of the first semester of grad- 
uate study by the Graduate School after consultation with the department 
head. 

10. A thesis subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research sub- 
mitted to the department head and to the student's advisory committee. 

11. Plan of work prepared by the advisory committee in consultation with the 
student and submitted in quadruplicate to the Graduate School by the end 
of the first semester in residence. 

12. Plan of work approved by the graduate dean and three copies returned to 
the department head. One copy is kept in department files, one goes to 
the adviser and one is given to the student. 

13. Student passes language examination (if required by the major department). 
The language requirement must be satisfied before admission to candidacy 
can be granted. 

14. Student applies for admission to candidacy for the master's degree. Applica- 
tion must be filed before the end of the first week of the last semester in 
residence and may not be filed before the language requirement is satisfied. 

15. Application is reviewed by the head of the major department and by the 
graduate dean and, if approved, the student becomes a candidate for the 
degree. 

16. At the discretion of the advisory committee, written examinations in the 
major and/or minor fields may be required of the candidate. Written exami- 



54 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



nations, when required, normally should not be held earlier than the end 
of the first month of the last semester in residence and not later than one 
week before the oral examination. 

17. A copy of a preliminary draft of the thesis is sulxnitted to the chairman 
of the student's committee for criticism. 

18. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chairman of the 
student's advisory committee submits a corrected draft of the dissertation 
to members for review. 

19. Permission for the candidate to take the final oral examination is requested 
of the Graduate School at least two weeks before the examination, and 
must be accompanied by a certification that the thesis is complete except 
for such revisions as may be necessary as a result of the final examination. 

20. Permission is granted by the graduate dean, date is set and examining 
committee appointed. The report on the final examination should be filed 
with the Graduate School as soon as the examination has been completed. 

21. Three copies of the thesis in final form signed by each member of the stu- 
dent's advisory committee and the adviser must be submitted to the Grad- 
uate School at least four weeks before the end of the semester or summer 
session in which the degree is to be conferred. 

22. Graduate School certifies to the Registration Office and to the general 
faculty that all requirements for the degree have been met and recommends 
the awarding of the degree. 

23. All requirements must be completed within six calendar years. 

24. Student must be registered in term in which degree is to be awarded unless 
he has completed all requirements for the degree, including submission of 
the thesis in final form to the Graduate School, by the first day of classes in 
the term in which the degree is to be awarded. 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is offered by North Carolina State University 
in the following fields of study: 

Animal Science Electrical Engineering 

Applied Mathematics Engineering Mechanics 

Biochemistry Entomology 

Biological and Agricultural Fiber and Polymer Science 

Engineering / Food Science 

Biomathematics Forestry 

Botany Genetics 

Chemical Engineering Horticultural Science 

Chemistry Industriid Engineering 

Civil Engineering Marine Sciences 

Crop Science Materials Engineering 

Economics Mathematics 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 55 



Mathematics Education Plant Pathology 

Mechanical Engineering Psychology 

Microbiology Science Education 

Nuclear Engineering Sociology 

Nutrition Soil Science 

Operations Research Statistics 

Physics Wood and Paper Science 

Physiology Zoology 

The doctor's degree symbolizes the fact that the recipient is capable of under- 
taking original research and scholarly work at the highest levels without super- 
vision. Therefore, the Doctor of Philosophy degree is not granted on the basis of 
successful completion of a given amount of course work, but rather upon the 
demonstration by a candidate of a comprehensive knowledge and high attainment 
in scholarship and research in a specialized field of study. These attainments are 
determined by the quality of the dissertation which the candidate prepares to 
report the results of original investigations and by passing successfully a series 
of rigorous and comprehensive examinations on the special and related fields of 
study. 

COURSE OF STUDY 

At the time of admission the student should, with the advice of the chairman of 
the department, elect a major field. During the student's first semester in residence, 
an advisory committee of at least four members will be appointed by the graduate 
dean, after consultation with the department head, to prepare with the student 
a plan of graduate work. Four copies of the program, signed by all members of the 
advisory committee and the department head or graduate administrator, are refer- 
red to the graduate dean for approval. When approved, three copies are returned 
to the department head, one being retained in the department files, a second copy 
is given to the chairman of the advisory committee and the third copy is given to 
the student. The subject of the dissertation must appear on the plan of work and 
any subsequent changes in the subject of the thesis or in the plan of graduate work 
must be reported to the Graduate School for approval. 

There are no definite requirements in credit hours for the doctor's degree. 
Major and Minor Fields: The Ph.D. degree is never granted for a program of mis- 
cellaneous studies. The program of work as a whole must be rationally unified 
and all constituent parts must contribute to an organized program of study 
and research. Courses must be selected fi-om groups embracing one principal 
subject of concentration, called the major; and fi-om cognate fields, called the 
minor. The minor program of study may be either a specific minor or interdis- 
ciplinary minor. 
Specific Minor: Supplementary to his major study a candidate is required to offer 
a minor in a single discipline or field which, in the judgment of the student's 
advisory committee, provides relevant cognate support to the major field. 
Interdisciplinary Minor: When an advisory committee finds that the needs of a 
doctoral student will be best served by preparation not available as a depart- 



56 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



mental minor, it has the alternative of developing a special program in lieu 
of the usual minor. To meet the requirements of this option a student may be 
required to complete courses in two or more departments outside his major, 
in related courses selected for their relevance to his particular area of concen- 
tration. Thus an appropriate program for a major in genetics might include 
courses in statistics, biochemistry and physiology. In the case of a split minor 
the two pertinent disciplines may be so identified on the "program of work" 
forms. 

RESIDENCE 

For the Doctor of Philosophy degree and the Doctor of Education degree, the 
student is expected to be registered for graduate work for at least six semesters 
beyond the bachelor's degree at some accredited graduate school. The amount of 
work from other institutions credited to the fulfillment of degree requirements will 
be determined by the dean after consultation with the student's advisory committee 
at the time the plan of graduate work is filed. 

At least two residence credits, as defined below, must be secured in continuous 
residence (registration in consecutive semesters) as a graduate student at North 
Carolina State University. Failure to take work during the summer does not break 
the continuity; however, summer school work can be used to fulfill this require- 
ment. 

Residence credit is based on the number of credits of graduate work beyond the 
bachelor's degree carried in a given term. During a regular semester, residence cre- 
dit is calculated in the following manner: 

Semester Credits Residence Credits 

9 or more 1 

6-8 % 

less than six" Ya 

The residence credit for a six-week summer term is only one-half the correspond- 
ing amount for a regular semester; i.e., six semester hours carry one-third residence 
credit and less than six credits, one-sixth residence credit. 

The candidate must complete all requirements for the degree, including the 
final examination on his dissertation and submission of the dissertation in final form 
to the Graduate School, within a period of seven calendar years fi-om the date of 
admission to candidacy for the degree. 
LANGUAGES 

A reading knowledge of scientific literature in at least one modern foreign lan- 
guage is required by most departments for the Doctor of Philosophy degree.""* 
The programs in chemistry, entomology, and mathematics require a reading know- 
ledge of two foreign languages or a comprehension in depth of one language. For 
the Doctor of Education degree the decision as to whether or not there will be a 
requirement is left with the student's advisory committee. 



* Including registration for thesis preparation on campus. 
** The foreigri language requirennents for particular degree programs may be modified subsequent 
to the publication of this catalog. A student would be well advised to check with the department 
in which he hopes to be working toward an advanced degree. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 57 



Comprehension in depth is to be interpreted as a proven abihty in the oral and 
composition elements of a particular language as well as the reading knowledge 
normally required. Ph.D. students desiring to offer one language in depth should 
consult with the head of the Department of Modern Languages as to the specific 
courses to be followed to achieve this comprehension. Specific arrangements may 
differ, depending upon the student's previous background in the language. It is em- 
phasized that students choosing to achieve competence in depth in one language 
will generally find this alternative more rigorous than proof of reading ability in 
two languages. 

If the student elects to work in two languages, the languages may be a combina- 
tion of Romance and Slavic, Romance and Germanic, or Slavic and Germanic. 

Students whose native tongue is some language other than English may use 
English as one of the two languages when two are required for the Doctor of Phil- 
osophy degree. When English is submitted in partial fulfillment of the language 
requirements, the native language may not be used to satisfy one of the language 
requirements. 

When only one language is required in a student's program, certification for that 
language must occur on this campus. 
THE DISSERTATION 

The doctoral dissertation presents the results of the candidate's original investi- 
gations in the field of his major interest. It must represent a contribution to know- 
ledge, adequately supported by data and written in a manner consistent with high 
standards of excellence in scholarship. Detailed instructions relating to the thesis 
may be obtained fi-om the Graduate Office. 

Publication of the results obtained in the thesis investigation is expected. Each 
copy of the thesis must be accompanied by an abstract of approximately 500 words. 

The dissertation will be examined by all members of the examining committee 
and must receive their approval to be acceptable to the Graduate Office. 

Two copies of the dissertation in final form, signed by all members of the stu- 
dent's advisory committee, and five copies of the abstract must be presented to the 
Graduate School not later than four weeks before the date on which the degree is 
to be awarded. 

North Carolina State now has an agreement with L^niversity Microfilms, Inc., 
of Ann Arbor, Michigan, by which all doctoral dissertations are microfilmed and 
abstracts of the dissertations are published in "Dissertation Abstracts." (See "Other 
Fees," page 36, under Tuition and Fees.) 

EXAMINATIONS 

Not earlier than the end of the second year of graduate study and not later than 
one sanest er (or its equivalent) before the final orals can be scheduled, each doc- 
toral student is required to pass general comprehensive examinations (known as the 
qualifying or preliminary examinations). The examinations are given by an examin- 
ing committee of graduate faculty members appointed by the graduate dean after 
consultation with the head of the department in which the student's major work has 
been taken. The examining committee usually consists of the student's advisory 
committee and a representative of the Graduate School, but may include other 



68 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



members of the graduate faculty. The examinations are open to all members of the 
graduate faculty who care to attend. 

Authorization for the qualifying examination is requested of the Graduate School 
by the chairman of the student's advisory committee when the major part of the stu- 
dent's program of course work has been completed and when, in the judgment of 
the committee, the student is prepared to devote the greater part of his time to the 
prosecution of his research study. Members of the examining committee will be 
notified of their appointment by the Graduate Office. Official printed forms will be 
supplied to the chairman of the examining committee for a report of the results of 
the examination. 

The examination consists of two parts — written examinations and an oral exami- 
nation held before the entire examining committee. When, in the judgment of the 
chairman of the student's advisory committee, the student is ready for the written 
examinations, arrangements may be made. Two approaches are acceptable. In the 
first, the chairman requests examination questions fi-om each member of the exam- 
ining committee. Each set of questions is given to the student by the chairman in 
any order that may seem appropriate. The questions, together with the student's 
answers, are then returned to the members of the committee for grading. This pro- 
cedure is still used by departments having a relatively small number of doctoral 
candidates. Many of the larger departments, however, have found it impractical to 
have separate written examinations prepared by each student's committee and have 
instituted departmental written examinations to be used for all candidates. These 
examinations are given several times during the year and scheduled dates are 
announced well in advance. Where written departmental examinations of this land 
are made available, the student majoring or minoring in the field of the department 
will be expected to make arrangements for talcing these examinations. Questions on 
written examinations may cover any phase of the course work taken by the student 
during the period of his graduate study or any subject logically related and basic to 
an understanding of the subject matter of the major and minor areas of study. They 
should be designed to measure the student's mastery of these subject matter fields 
and the adequacy of his preparation for research investigations. 

Upon satisfactory completion of the written examinations the student must piiss 
an oral examination before the entire examining committee. This examination is 
usually held within two weeks after the chairman of the examining committee has 
certified to the Graduate School that the student has completed satisfactorilv the 
written examinations. The members of the examining committee will be notified by 
the Graduate School of the time and place arranged for the oral examination. The 
oral examination is designed to test the student's ability to relate factual knowledge 
to specific circumstances. In the oral examination the student is expected to use his 
knowledge with accuracy and promptness and to demonstrate that his thinking is 
not limited to the facts learned in course work. 

A unanimous vote of approval is required for passing the preliminary examina- 
tion. Approval may be conditioned, however, upon the completion of additional 
work in some particular field to the satisfaction of the committee. In case a single 
dissenting vote is cast, the course of action to be taken will become a matter for 
decision by the Administrative Board. Upon receiving the approval of the examin- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 59 



ing committee the student is admitted to candidacy for the doctorate. 

A final oral examination is also required. An interval of at least one semester or 
its equivalent must elapse between admission to candidacy and the final oral exam- 
ination. 

This examination is held after the dissertation has been completed and consists 
of a defense by the candidate of the methods used and the conclusions reached in 
his research study. The examination is conducted by an examining committee. The 
examining committee usually includes the student's advisory committee, plus a 
representative of the Graduate School, although this procedure is not always 
adopted. The examining committee is appointed by the graduate dean after consul- 
tation with the head of the student's major department. 

Failure of a student to pass either the preliminary or the final examination termi- 
nates his graduate work at this institution unless otherwise recommended by the 
examining committee. No reexamination may be given until at least one fiiU semes- 
ter has elapsed since the first examination. Only one reexamination is permitted. 

See Summary of Procedures for Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education 
Degrees below. 
ADMISSION TO CANDIDACY 

A student is admitted to candidacy after he has successfully' passed the prelimi- 
nary examinations. The language requirements must be fulfilled before permission 
to take the preliminary examination is granted. 

Doctor of Education Degree 

The School of Education offers graduate programs leading to the Ed.D. degree 
for majors in Adult and Community College Education, Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion, Educational Administration and Supervision, Guidance and Personnel Ser- 
vices, Industrial Arts Education and Occupational Education. Details are presented 
on page 114. The philosophy and requirements for the Ed.D. degrees are the same 
as those expressed herein for the Doctor of Philosophy degree except for the 
language requirement. 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 

A booklet containing detailed instructions about the form of the dissertation may 
be obtained from the Graduate School. 

Further information concerning graduate work at North Carolina State Univer- 
sity may be secured fi-om Dr. Walter |. Peterson, Dean of the Graduate School, 
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 

Summary of Procedures for the Doctor of Philosophy and 
Doctor of Education Degrees 

1. Letter of inquiry from prospective student to Graduate School or depart- 
ment head. 

2. Mailing of proper forms to student by Graduate School. 



60 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

3. Receipt of application forms by Graduate School. 

4. Application with transcript sent to department head for study. 

5. Department head recommends acceptance of prospective student stating 
curriculum in which he will work. 

6. Assuming the prospective student meets the minimum scholastic standards, 
notice of acceptance is mailed to him by the Graduate School. 

7. Permit to register is sent by Graduate School to the registrar. 

8. Student arrives, reports to the department head, is assigned an adviser and 
makes out a roster of courses in consultation with departmental adviser. 

9. Advisory committee of at least four members is appointed in the first term 
of graduate study by the graduate dean after consultation with the depart- 
ment head. 

10. Plan of work is prepared by the advisory committee in consultation with the 
student and submitted in quadruplicate to the Graduate School by the end 
of the first semester in residence. 

11. Plan of work is approved by the graduate dean and three copies returned to 
the department head. One copy is kept in department files, one goes to the 
adviser and one is given to the student. 

12. A dissertation subject is selected and an outline of the proposed research 
submitted to the department head and the student's advisory committee. 

13. Student passes language examination(s). (See page 56.) 

14. When the student has completed satisfactorily all the courses in the minor 
field on his plan of work, he may, with the consent of the chairman of his 
committee, take the written qualifying examination in the field of his 
minor. If desirable, this examination may be taken if all but one of the 
courses in the minor field have been completed and the student is taking 
the last such course during the semester in which the examination is held 
The results of this examination will be reported to the Graduate School. 
The examination in the minor field may be combined with the examination 
in the major field. 

15. The written examination in the major field may be scheduled upon appro- 
val of the dean of the Graduate School not earlier than the end of the se- 
cond year of graduate study and not later than one semester before the final 
oral examination would be scheduled. The results of this examination will 
be reported to the Graduate School. 

16. When all written examinations have been completed satisfactorily, the oral 
qualifying examination may be held. The Graduate School is notified two 
weeks in advance of the time and place of this examination. The report of 
the examination is sent to the Graduate School. If the report is favorable, 
the student is admitted to candidacy. 

17. A copy of the prefiminary draft of the dissertation is submitted to the chair- 
man of the student's committee for criticism. 

18. At least two weeks prior to the final oral examination, the chairman of the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



61 



student's advisory committee submits a corrected draft of the dissertation 
to members for review. 

19. One semester after admission to candidacy or later, permission for the can- 
didate to take the final oral examination is requested of the Graduate School 
by the chairman of the candidate's advisory committee. Requests should be 
filed at least two weeks before the date of the examination and must be 
accompanied by a certification that the thesis is complete except for such 
revisions as may be necessary as a result of the final examination. 

20. Permission is granted by the graduate dean if the student's record is in order. 
A date is set and examining committee appointed. The report on the exam- 
ination should be filed with the Graduate School as soon as the examination 
has been completed. 

21. Two copies of the thesis in final form and five copies of the abstract must 
be submitted to the Graduate School not later than four weeks before the 
end of the term in which the degree is to be awarded. It must carry the 
signatures of all members of the advisory committee. 

22. The Graduate School certifies to the Registration Office and to the general 
faculty that all requirements for the degree have been met and recommends 
the awarding of the degree. 

23. All requirements must be completed within seven calendar years fi-om date 
of admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree. 

24. The student must be registered in the term in which the degree is to be 
awarded unless he has completed all requirements for the degree, including 
submission of the thesis in final form to the Graduate School, by the first 
day of classes in the term in which the degree is to be awarded. 



The color of objects is measured in Textiles utilizing a "color eye. 

f 




Electrical engineering students en- 
gage in such activities as designing 
and building computer graphics 
equipment. 





NCSU politics students observe 
and utilize the resources unique 
to a state capital. American poli- 
tical institutions and processes, 
administration and comparative 
politicaJ. development are politics 
concentrations. 



Antibody formation later detectable 
in plant protein is this microbiology 
student's research project. 




*■: .7»- ' 



■ ^«l|«f!*^' 



Ill 



The sociology curriculum ranges from rehabilitation to community and area devel- 
opment. Here a sociology major counsels a Polk Youth Center inmate. 



This industrial engineering student is assemblying 
a plant layout in an engineering shop. 





The laboratoi-y digester in the 
School of Forest Resources is 
filled with wood chips in 
preparation for pulping stud- 
ies on odor abatement. 



64 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



SHI" 


- 




m^ 












# m^ 


1^ 


?'- 




^ T" 

-^^ .t)^ 


'^^ 







Design students are encouraged to present plans before juries of fellow students 
and professors. 



FIELDS OF INSTRUCTION 



The course descriptions are planned for the academic years 1974-1975 and 
1975-1976, unless indicated otherwise. Specific courses may not be oflFered, 
however, if registration for a course is too low, or if faculty or facilities are not 
available. 

Courses in the 500 series are open to seniors and graduate students. All 
courses in this series carry full graduate credit. Courses in the 600 series are 
open to graduate students only. Master's programs must include not less than 
20 semester hours from courses in the 500 and 600 series. 

In a typical course description, the semester hours of credit, the number of 
actual lecture and laboratory hoius of meeting per week, and the term or terms 
in which the course is oflFered are shown in this manner: 2(1-2) F,S,Sum. or 
1-3 F,S,Sum. 

The 2 indicates the number of semester houis credit given for satisfactory 
completion of the course. The (1-2) indicates that the course meets for one hour of 
lecture and for two hours of laboratory work each week. The 1-3 indicates that a 
maximum of three and a minimum of one semester hours credit can be earned. This 
is to be arranged with the instructor. The F designates that the course is to be 
given in the fall semester. Likewise the S designates spring and the Sum., summer. 

For 400-level course descriptions, see the Undergraduate Catalog. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 65 

Adult and Community College Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor E. ]. Boone, Head 

Professor: C. Trent; Extension Professor: J. D. George; Visiting Professor: 
I. E. Ready; Adjunet Professor: B. E. Fountain; Associate Professors: 
W. L. Carpenter, W. L. Gragg, R. W. Shearon; Assistant Professors: J. C. 
Glass jr., G. E. Parsons, K. B. Segner III; Extension Assistant Professor: 
Estelle E. White; Visiting Assistant Professor: D. B. Lumsden; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: C. j. Law Jr. 

The depai-tment is a component of both the School of Education and the 
School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. It offers programs of study leading to 
the Master of Education, Master of Science and Doctor of Education degrees 
with a major in adult and community college education. The program is directed 
toward administrators, supervisors and teachers in university and cooperative 
extension and community colleges and other adult education agencies. 

The curriculum of the department is interdisciplinary. It is specifically 
designed to help students acquire an integrated conceptual and theoretical 
framework derived from the behavioral agencies, social sciences and education 
that will equip them to plan, administer and effect viable and relevant programs 
of change with individual learners, groups and larger societal aggregates in 
both formal and infoiTnal settings. 

Further, the curriculum provides opportunities for students to acquire a high 
level of competence in identifying and diagnosing problematic situations and 
proposing alternative courses of action and strategies in seeking solutions to 
problems. Cognate fields of study include anthropology, economics, politics, 
psychology and sociology. 

The department is housed in Ricks Hall and Poe Hall. Graduate students on 
assistantships and internships are provided office space and equipment. Other 
graduate students are provided study space when possible. 

For descriptions of the adult and community college education courses listed 
below, see page 122 to 134. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 The Community College System. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 501 (SOC 501) Leadership. 3(3-0) F,S. (See sociology, page 243.) 

ED 502 (PS 502) Public Administration. 3(3-0) F,S. (See politics, page 226.) 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and Community College Education. 

3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, Contemporary Nature. 3(3-0) 

F.S.Sum. 



66 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 513 (SOC 513) Community Organization. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education. 

3(3-0) S,Sum. 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education. 

^^3-0) F.Sum. 

ED 559 Learning Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 596 Topical ProWems in Adult Education. Credits Arranged. F.S.Sum. 

ED 598 Concepts and Strategies of Understanding, Motivating and Teaching 
Disadvantaged Adults. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. 3(3-0) F.Sum. 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 696 Seminar in Adult and Community College Education. 1-3. F,S,Sum. 



Agricultural Education 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see Education, 
page 115.) 

Air Conservation 

The air conservation faculty includes some 50 faculty members representing 20 
departments in four schools. It is the intent of this faculty and the associated 
program to provide training for students in the many disciplines related to air 
conservation. Such areas as air sampling, biological eflFects, air quality 
management, sources, meteorology, law and economics are all important aspects 
covered by course offerings and research projects. 

A graduate student desiring to minor in Air Conservation will have on his 
committee a member of the Air Conservation faculty from outside his major 
department, representing this minor field. While there are no restrictions on the 
major, students minoring in Air Conservation should have a strong background in 
the life sciences, the physical sciences or engineering. The minor program will 
normally consist of 10 or more credits for the master's degree, 16 or more for 
the doctorate. 

A variety of courses bearing on diflFerent aspects of the air-conservation problem 
may be taken on this campus (under the auspices of the Triangle Universities 
Consortium on Air Pollution) or at UNC-Chapel Hill or Duke. The listing below 
shows courses available at North Carolina State University. For courses at Duke 
and Chapel Hill see appropriate catalogs. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 67 

Air Pollutants and Their Sources 

CE 576 Atmospheric Pollution. 

Meteorology and Pollutant Transport 
MY 512 Micrometeorology. 

MY 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. 

MY 556 Air Pollution Meteorology. 

MY 627 Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion. 

Air Sampling and Analysis 

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences, I. 

CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation. 

Effects on Human, Animal, and Plant Receptors 
BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology. 
BO 480 Air Pollution Biology. 

ZO 400 Biological Basis of Man's Environment. 

BO 561 Physiological Ecology. 

TOX 515 Environmental Toxicology. 

Air -Quality Management 

CE 472 Elements of Air Quality Management. 

CHE 535 Engineering Economy in Air-Pollution Control Systems. 

MAE 409 Particulate Control in Industrial Atmospheric Pollution. 

MAE 510 Theory of Particulate Collection in Air Pollution Control. 

WPS 525 Pollution Abatement in Forest Products Industries. 

Air -Quality Law and Institutions 

PS (ED) 502 Public Administration. 

UNI 495 Special Topics in University Studies (Environment and Law). 

Air -Conservation Economics 

EC 401 Economic Analysis for Non-Majors. 

EC 515 Water Resources Economics. 

EC 550 Mathematical Models in Economics. 

OR 501 Introduction to Operations Research. 

Communications concerning the Air Conservation program, including inquiries 
from students wishing to minor in Air Conservation, should be directed to: Chair- 
man, Air Conservation Committee, Department of Chemical Engineering, 103 
Riddick, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 



Animal Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 
Professor I. D. Porterfield, Head 

Professors: E. R. Barrick, E. G. Batte, A. J. Clawson, E. J. Eisen, L. Goode, 
G. Hyatt Jr., J. M. Leatherwood, J. G. Lecce, J. E. Legates — Dean, 
School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, B. T. McDaniel, R. D. Mochrie, 
A. H. Rakes, H. A. Ramsey, H. A. Schneider, L. C. Ulberg, G. H. Wise; 



68 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Professors Emeriti: F. H. Si^th, H. A. Stewart; Extension Professor: R. F. 
Behlow; Associate Professors: E. V. Caruolo, D. G. Davenport, E. U. 
DiLLARD, H. J. Gold, R. W. Harvey, E. E. Jones, J. J. McNeill, D. J. 
Mongol, R. M. Myers, O. W. Robison, J. C. Wilk; Extension Associate Pro- 
fessors: J. R. Jones, F. D. Sargent; As^stant Professors: J. A. Coalson, B. H. 
JOHNSON, W. L. Johnson 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 
Professors: C. H. Hill, G. Matrone, S. B. Tove 

The Department of Animal Science ofiFers programs leading to the degrees 
of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy with majors in six difiFerent 
disciplines. Animal science traditionally has been oriented toward the study 
of domestic animals. Although the problems of the livestock industry have not 
all been solved, the overall approach to research in the general area of animal 
science has changed and will continue to change in the future. In order to 
obtain added insight into the underlying problems currently facing animal 
science, students are trained in those disciplines which provide a basic under- 
standing of the processes of life. 

The Department of Animal Science offers a unique opportunity for students 
to obtain advanced training in a diversity of basic sciences and to integrate this 
experience into the framework of a living system. Students in this department may 
obtain degrees in the disciplines of biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, nutrition 
and physiology as well as a major in animal science. Students with a major 
in animal science specialize in one or more of the basic biological disciplines or 
in the more applied areas such as economics and management. This major also 
provides for the student who desires to achieve a multi-disciplinary experience. 
Students who desire a major in one of the disciplines develop a program strong 
in the basic sciences. At the successful termination of such a program they are 
qualified to compete with students trained in that discipline, but also have the 
added capabilities of integrating basic knowledge into a complete living system; 
i.e., the domestic animal. The student may minor in any one of the above areas 
or may choose as a minor such areas as statistics, economics, chemistry or other 
biological sciences. One's research experiences can be with a specific species or 
with a variety of species from cattle to mice. 

The availability of a variety of modern laboratories, specialized equipment 
and many difiFerent species which serve as biological models enables the student 
to become familiar with research tools and their use in expanding knowledge in 
the several segments which go to make up the field of animal science. The 
required list of courses and the research program is developed for the individual 
student. The objective of the program is to provide the student with a challenging 
progriun offering one an opportunity to develop creative ability to such an extent 
that one will have the knowledge and motivation to contribute significantly to a 
chosen discipline. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANS 401 Reproductive Physiology. Prerequisite: ZO 421. 3(2-3) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 69 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management. Prerequisite: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. 

ANS 403 Swine Management. Prerequisite: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management. Prerequisite: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. 

ANS 405 Lactation. Prerequisite: ZO 421. 3(2-3) F. 

ANS 406 Sheep Management. Prerequisite: ANS 204. 3(2-3) F. 

ANS 409 (FS 409) Meat and Meat Products. 3(2-3) S. (See food science, page 
152.) 

ANS 410 Horse Management. 3(2-2) F. 

ANS 411 Breeding and Improvement of Domestic Animals. Prerequisite: GN 411. 
3(2-2) F. 

ANS 415 (PO 415, NTR 415) Comparative Nutrition. Prerequisite: CH 220 or 
CH 221. 3(3-0) F. 

ANS 416 (NTR 416) Quantitative Nutrition. Prerequisite: BCH 351. 3(1-6) F. 
ANS 490 Animal Science Seminar. 1(1-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANS 502 (PHY 502) Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. Prerequisite: ZO 
421 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. Emphasis will be placed on discussions of 
mechanisms which control the reproductive processes. Mechanisms which are 
species limited will be compared with those which are shared by all species. Cur- 
rent knowledge of some subsystems will be investigated in detail while others will 
be referred to in reviews of well-documented research findings. Ulberg 

ANS 505 Diseases of Farm Animals. Prerequisites: CH 101, CH 103. 3(3-0) F. The 
pathology of bacterial, viral, parasitic, nutritional, thermal and mechanical disease 
processes. Batte 

ANS 508 (GN 508) Genetics of Animal Improvement. Prerequisites: GN 411, 
ST 511. 3(3-0) S. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of basic principles of popula- 
tion and quantitative genetics in animal improvement. Factors affecting genie and 
genotypic frequencies and methods of estimating genetic and nongenetic variance, 
herit abilities and breeding values are presented. The roles of mating systems and 
selection procedures in producing superior genetic populations are examined. 

Robison 

BCH 551 General Biochemistry. 3(3-0) F. (See biochemistry, page 74.) 

MB 551 Immunology and Serology. 2(1-2) S. (See microbiology, page 203.) 

ANS 580 (PHY 580) Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. Prerequisites: BCH 
351, ZO 421. 3(3-0) F. The course provides detailed discussions of the mammalian 
endocrine system with emphasis on the functional aspect, chemistry, and mode of 
action of specific hormones secreted from major endocrine glands. Modem bio- 
chemical and physiological principles of hormonal integrations and neuroendocrine 
integration are examined. B. H. Johnson 



70 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science. Maximum 6 F,S. Special problems 
may be selected or assigfned in various phases of animal science. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ANS 603 (GN 603) Population Genetics in Animal Improvement. Prerequisites: 
ST 512, GN 506. 3(3-0) F. A study of the forces influencing gene frequencies, in- 
breeding and its effects, and alternative breeding plans. Eisen 

ANS 604 (PHY 604) Experimental Animal Physiology. Prerequisite: ZO 513 
(PHY 513) or equivalent. A study of the theories and techniques involved in the 
use of animals in physiological investigation with special emphasis on the diversity 
of physiological applications on this campus. Caruolo 

NTR 608 Energy Metabolism. 3(3-0) F. (See nutrition, page 209.) 

ANS 622 (ST 622) Principles of Biological Assays. Prerequisites: BCH 551, 
ST 512. 3(3-0) S. Techniques and designs of biological assays. The interrelationship 
of logical principles, designis and analyses is emphasized. Graduate Staff 

ANS 653 (BCH 653) Mineral Metabolism. 3(3-0) F. (See biochemistry, page 75.) 

ANS 690 Seminar in Animal Nutrition. Prerequisite: Consent of seminar leaders. 
1(1-0) F,S. Orientation in philosophy of research, preparation for research and 
general research methodology. Graduate Staff 

ANS 699 Research in Animal Science. Credits Arranged. A maximum of six hours 
is allowed toward the master's degree; no limitation on credits in doctorate pro- 
gram. Graduate Staff 

Anthropology 

(For anthropology courses, see sociology.) 

Architecture 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. P. Burns Jr., Head 

Professors: J. H. Cox, C. E. McKinney— Dean, School of Design, D. R. Stuart; 
Professors Emeriti: H. H. Harris, H. L. Kamphoefner; Associate Professors: 
P. Batchelor, G. L. Bireune, R. H. Clark, J. P. Reuer, H. Sanoff, V. F. 
Shogren; Assistant Professors: D. W. Barnes, E. P. Brantly 

The Department of Architecture offers programs of study leading to the Master 
of Architecture degree. While designed primarily as the concluding two-year 
professional component to follow the four-year undergraduate Bachelor of En- 
vironmental Design curriculum in the total six-year program, the graduate pro- 
gram also provides courses of study for graduates holding the five-year Bachelor 
of Architecture degree. In addition, applicants with undergraduate degrees in 
fields other than architecture may be accepted as graduate students, and extended 
programs of study leading to the Master of Architecture degree will be designed 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 71 

to build on their previous academic experience. This program normally requires 
three to four years in residence. A group of core courses has been developed to 
provide in the first semester an intensive orientation to current concepts and 
activities in the environmental design field for entering graduate students who 
come from non-design backgrounds. 

The nature and complexity of the tasks which confront the architect make it 
paramount that the master's program be broadly based and diversified. Flexibility 
is provided so that each student can structure a program of study in accordance 
with expressed interests and demonstrated capabilities. Essentially, master's candi- 
dates are afforded concentrated education in depth so that they can prepare them- 
selves for significant professional involvement in the environmental design field as 
practitioners, teachers, researchers, or in other more specialized areas. 

The advanced architectural design studio provides an arena for graduate stu- 
dents to address both real-life problems of immediate concern as well as theoretical 
issues having implications for long-range development. Of special interest are 
those problems at the frontiers of the architectural profession, which have inherent 
potential for research, innovation and for the development of emergent roles for 
new professionals. In response to these objectives, the graduate program in archi- 
tecture has developed three major studio options— building systems, community 
development and urban design. The student normally selects one of the three 
options but may call on other faculty expertise to support his individualized 
development program with the possibility of self-directed, independent studies 
during the final two semesters. 

The program requires of all students undertaking the normal two-year master's 
program a minimum of 48 credit hours of course work of which 75 percent will be 
in the major field; the remainder, constituting the minor field, will be selected to 
reinforce the student's individual abilities and long-range career goals. While it is 
conceivable that almost any relevant field of study could be explored, it is assumed 
that the following interdisciplinary areas of investigation would most frequently be 
chosen: construction management; environmental policy planning; housing 
systems; environmental psychology; human behavior; urban physical systems; 
urban technology; facilities planning^educational, health care, etc.; environ- 
mental technology; design theory and philosophy; and visual communication. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ARC 400 Intermediate Architectural Design (Series). Prerequisite: DN 202 or 
equivalent or consent of department. 4(1-9) F,S. 

ARC 415 (CE 415) Architectural Structures I. Prerequisite: ARC 316 (EM 316). 
Not open to CE students. 3(2-3) F. 

ARC 416 (CE 416) Architectural Structures II. Prerequisite: ARC 415 (CE 415). 
Not open to CE students. 3(2-3) S. 

ARC 431 Industrialized Systems Building. Prerequisite: ARC 331. 2(1-3) F,S. 

ARC 432 Climate Control Systems and Design. Prerequisite: ARC 332. 2(1-3) F. 

ARC 433 Illumination Design. Prerequisite: ARC 332. 2(1-3) S. 



72 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ARC 441 Design Methods. 2(2-0) F,S. 

ARC 491 Special Projects in Architecture. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 1-4 F,S. 

ARC 495 Special Problems in Architecture. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 1-3 F,S. 

ARC 499 Architecture Seminar. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ARC 501, 502 Advanced Architectural Design I, II. Prerequisites: (501) 16 credits 
of ARC 400 or equivalent; (502) ARC 501. 6(3-9) F,S. Advanced studies in architec- 
tural desigfn which investigates large-scale architectural problems having complex 
functional, social and economic implications; special emphasis is gfiven to problem 
identification, program formulation and application of advanced design methods. 

ARC 511 Professional Practice I. Prerequisite: Fourth year standing. 2(2-0) F. 
The evolution of architecture as a modern practical profession; obligations of the 
profession to society and to itself; the legal and ethical position of the architect in 
practice; comparative study of documents; the architect's working organization; 
emerging techniques of office practice. 

ARC 512 Professional Practice II. Prerequisite: Fourth year standing. 2(2-0) S. 
Continuing study of standard documents and emerging techniques of practice, with 
emphasis on the principles and improved techniques of writing construction speci- 
fications; interrelationship of The Contract Documents; comparative study of 
techniques for controlling competitive bidding. 

ARC 521, 522 Advanced Architectural Structures I, II. Prerequisites: (521) ARC 
416 (CE 416); (522) ARC 521. 3(3-0) F.S. Gravity and non-gravity loads on 
structures; comparative behavior of structural materials; comparative behavior of 
simple structural systems; approximate and exact analysis procedures as applied 
to systems; principles of approximate exact design in timber, steel and reinforced 
concrete; architectural/structural/mechanical compatibility in systems; basic prin- 
ciples of foundation analyses and design. 

ARC 531, 532 Advanced Building Technology I, II. Prerequisites: ARC 331, 332. 
2(1-3) F,S. A synthesis of studies in building science undertaken in previous courses. 
Material assemblies in practical applications, dimensional characteristics of 
mechanical and construction systems for buildings, and special projects in selected 
areas of building science. 

ARC 551 Research Methods in Architecture. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
2(2-0) F,S. Seminar on the quantitative methods from various disciplines towards 
the scientific inquiry of knowledge. Analysis of techniques and instruments ap- 
propriate in solving problems involving scaling, measurement, modeling and 
gaming within the scope of the physical environment. 

ARC 591, 592 Advanced Topics in Architecture I, II. Prerequisite: Advanced or 
graduate standing in School of Design or departmental approval. 1-4 F,S. Investi- 
gation of advanced topics in specialized aspects of architecture for interested 
advanced undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Design. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ARC 601, 602 Advanced Architectural Design III, IV. Prerequisites: (601) ARC 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 73 

502; (602) ARC 601. 6(3-9) F,S. Continuing advanced studies in architectural 
design in which are synthesized all previous design experience through in-depth 
investigations of significant environmental problems. Consultation with planners 
and environmental specialists is extensive. A terminal project is developed in the 
spring semester. 

ARC 621, 622 Advanced Architectural Structures III, IV. Prerequisites: (621) 
ARC 522; (622) ARC 621. 2(1-3) F,S. Special projects in the study of complex 
structural systems: cable structures, membranes, thin shells, folded plates, arches, 
vaults, space frames; studies of construction techniques, prefabrication, structural 
behavior and stress analysis through model work and simplified calculation pro- 
cedures. 

ARC 691, 692 Special Topics in Architecture. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
1-6 F,S. An investigation of special topics in architecture of particular interest to 
advanced students under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial basis. 
Credits and content will vary with the needs of students. 



Biochemistry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. Matrone, Head 

Professors: F. B. Armstrong, H. R. Horton, J. S. Kahn, L S. Longmuir, A. R. 
Main, S. B. Tove; Associate Professor: E. C. Sisler; Assistant Professors: 
J. A. Knopp, Elizabeth C. Theil 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: L. W. Aurand, S. G. Levine, W. P. Tucker; Associate Professors: 
J. BoRDNER, E. E. Jones 

The field of biochemistry applies and extends the concepts of chemistry and 
physics to the investigation of biological problems. The Department of Bio- 
chemistry offers courses of study leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. 

A student entering into graduate study in biochemistry should have a bachelor's 
degree in chemistry or in a biological science. The undergraduate program of 
studies should include a minimum of two semesters of organic chemistry, two 
semesters of physical chemistry, one semester of quantitative analytical chemistry 
and one semester of qualitative organic analysis. Students who lack undergraduate 
courses considered essential for graduate study in biochemistry may be admitted 
to the graduate program, provided the deficiencies are corrected early in their 
graduate work. 

Courses in General and Experimental Biochemistry and in Intermediary 
Metabolism are required as part of programs leading to advanced degrees in bio- 
chemistry. In addition to completing a program of study approved by one's ad- 
visory committee, a candidate for an advanced degree is expected to participate 
regularly in seminars throughout one's graduate residence and to engage in 



74 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

independent research leading to the completion of a scholarly thesis. Research 
programs are currently being conducted in biochemical genetics, enzyme structure 
and mechanisms, enzyme kinetics, biochemical aspec-ts of toxicology, regulatory 
mechanisms, photosynthesis and electron transport, lipid metabolism, metabolism 
and function of transition elements, plant growth and development, physical 
biochemistry of macromolecules, oxygen transport mechanisms, and regulation 
during development. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BCH 452 Experimental Biochemistry, Prerequisite: BCH 351, or corequisite 
BCH 551; quantitative chemical analysis recommended. 3(1-6) F. An introduction 
to fundamental techniques of biochemistry and molecular biology involving experi- 
mental study of carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids, lipids, metabolism 
and metabolic controls. Designed to accompany BCH 551. Theil, Knopp 

BCH 453 Quantitative Problems in Experimental Biochemistry. Corequisite: 
BCH 452. 1(0-1) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BCH 551 General Biochemistry. Prerequisites: Three years of chemistry including 
CH 223 or equivalent; CH 331 or CH 431 strongly recommended. 3(3-0) F. Principles 
of modern biochemistry including a study of structural and metabolic relationships 
of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, enzymes and metabolic regulation. 

Jones 

BCH 553 (PHY 553) Physiological Biochemistry. Prerequisite: BCH 551. 
3(3-0) S. Application of biochemical methods to the elucidation of the function of 
whole organisms. A. Biochemistry of 1) blood, 2) water, electrolyte, acid-base 
balance, 3) renal function, 4) muscle metabolism, 5) central nervous system, 6) 
autonomic nervous system, 7) endocrine system. B. Biochemistry of adaptation to 
environment 1) high and low PO2, 2) hot and cold, 3) wet and dry, 4) pollution. 

Longmuir 

BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology. Prerequisite: BCH 351 or consent 
of instructor. 2(1-3) F. Theory and application of radioisotope techniques used in 
biology. The different modes of radioactivity are correlated with methods of 
measurement. Emphasis on use and limitations of various instruments and 
techniques and on their application to research problems. Sisler 

BCH 557 Introductory Enzyme Kinetics. Prerequisites: BCH 551 and MA 201 
or MA 212. 3(3-0) S. Basic principles of chemical kinetics applied to the develop- 
ment of enzyme kinetics. Limitations of the Michaelis equation are considered in 
light of the general rate equation. Inhibition and activation, pH functions, effects of 
temperature, and elucidation of mechanisms are also considered. Main 

BCH 561 (GN 561. MB 561) Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. Prerequisites: 
BCH 351 or BCH 551, GN 411 or GN 505, MB 401 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A study 
of the development of the fields of biochemical genetics and microbial genetics, 
emphasizing both techniques and concepts currently used in research in these 
areas. Includes lectures and discussions of current research publications. 

Armstrong 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 75 

BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Prerequisite: BCH 351 or equivalent. 
Credits Arranged, Maximum 3 F,S Sum. The study of topics of special interest by 
small groups of students instructed by members of the faculty, usually for the 
purpose of developing new courses. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BCH 651 Physical Biochemistry. Prerequisites: BCH 551, CH 331 or CH 431, or 
consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. Structural and physical properties of biological 
macromolecules and the application of physical methods to their study. Knopp 

BCH 652 Biochemical Research Techniques. Prerequisites: BCH 551; BCH 452 
or CH 315 or CH 411. 3-5 S. Laboratory projects involving separation and char- 
acterization of biochemical constituents including enzymes. Kahn 

BCH 653 (ANS 653) Mineral Metabolism. Prerequisite: BCH 551. 3(3-0) F. 
Principles of mineral metabolism with emphasis on metabolic functions, reaction 
mechanisms and interrelationships. Matrone 

BCH 655 Intermediary Metabolism L Prerequisite: BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. Enzyme 
kinetics, energetics, and the metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids. Tove 

BCH 657 Intermediary Metabolism II. Prerequisite: BCH 551. 3(3-0) F. Enzyme 
mechanisms, metabolism of proteins, nucleic acids, and their constituents, and 
metabolic controls. Horton 

BCH 659 (CH 659) Natural Products. 3(3-0) F. (See chemistry, page 92.) 

BCH 691 Seminar in Biochemistry. 1 F,S. Graduate Staff 

BCH 695 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in 
biochemistry. Credits Arranged. Critical study of special problems and selected 
topics of current interest in biochemistry and related fields. Graduate Staff 

BCH 699 Biochemical Research. Credits Arranged. Graduate Staff 



Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor F. J. Hassler, Head 

Professors: H. D. Bowen, D. H. Howells, B. K. Huang, W. H. Johnson, G. J. 
Kriz, C. W. Suggs; Professor USDA: J. W. Dickens; Associate Professors: 
R. G. Holmes, F. J. Humenik, E. G. Humphries, W. F. McClure, R. P. 
RoHRBACH, E. H. Wiser, J. H. Young; Associate Professors USDA. T. B. 
Whitaker, Assistant Professors: C. F. Abrams Jr., G. R. Baughman, M. R. 
Overcash, R. W. Skaggs, R. E. Sowell 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 
Associate Professors: D. D. Hamann, V. A. Jones 



76 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering offers programs of 
studv for the Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Biological 
and Agricultural Engineering degiees. 

For those interested primarily in a broadened backgiound of engineering science 
and technology — without the thesis requirement — the Master of Biological and 
Agricultural Engineering progriim pemiits a wide selection from a variety of 
advanced courses. While this program is primarily for those intending to terminate 
graduate study at the master's level, a student may, with departmental approval, 
develop a plan of study under this program which leads to study for the doctorate. 

In the Master of Science program emphasis is placed on mathematics and theory 
iis the unifying link between othenvise widely divergent fields of knowledge in 
the biological and physical sciences, and as prerequisites to effective engineering 
advances in biological and agricultural areas. As the student acquires competence 
in the advanced methods of science, he applies knowledge by conducting an 
original research investigation and by writing and defending a thesis. 

Study for the Doctor of Philosophy degiee builds on the Miister of Science pro- 
gram with additiouiil formal study followed by a period of independent dissertation 
research. 

Current departmental research projects available for graduate student partici- 
pation include: watershed hydrology; drainage and irrigation; functional develop- 
ment of field machinery; fruit and vegetable mechanization; pesticide application; 
plant growth dynamics; crop process engineering and materials handling; bio- 
physics of agricultural processing; human and biomedical engineering; operations 
research; computer simulation analysis of biological and physical systems; biological 
instrumentation; physical properties of biomaterials; engineering aspects of plant 
and animal physiology; and waste management. 

Graduate students have access to modern well-equipped research laboratories, 
controlled-environment test chambers, a research shop manned by competent 
mechanics, and excellent computing facilities. 

Information concerning fellowships and assistantships may be obtained fiom 
the head of the department. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery. Prerequisites: BAE 211, PY 211 or PY 
221. 3(2-3) S. 

BAE 432 (FS 432) Food Engineering II. Prerequisite: FS 331 (BAE 331). 
3(2-3) S. 

BAE 433 Crop Preservation and Processing. Prerequisite: BAE 341. 3(2-3) F. 

BAE 451, 452 Agricultural Engineering Design I, II. Prerequisite: Senior stand- 
ing in SBE curriculum. 3(1-6) F,S. 

B.\E 461 Analysis of Agricultural Production Systems. Prerequisites: MA 201, 
EC 201, CSC 111.3(3-0) F. 

BAE 462 Functional Design of Field Machines. Prerequisites: BAE 361, MAE 
301, SSC 200. 3(2-2) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 77 

BAE 465 (CHE 465) Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. 3(3-0) S. See 
chemical engineering, page 86.) 

BAE 472 Agricultural Water Management. Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200. 
4(3-2) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BAE 552 Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing. Pre- 
requisites: EE 331, MA 301. 2(1-3) Alternate F. Theory and application of primary 
sensing elements and transducers. Generalized performance characteristics and 
the use of standards. Use of specialized measurement systems for agricultural 
research and processing including an introduction to correlation and power spectral 
density measurements. Rohrbach 

BAE 570 (CE 570, MB 570) Sanitary Microbiology. Prerequisite: MB 401 or 
equivalent. 3(2-3) S. Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry are 
presented and related to problems of stream pollution, refuse disposal and biological 
treatment. Laboratory exercises present basic microbiological techniques and 
illustrate from a chemical viewpoint some of the basic microbial aspects of waste 
disposal. Humenik 

B.\E 578 (CE 578) Agricultural Waste Management. Prerequisite: Graduate or 
advanced undergraduate standing. 3(2-3) F. A study of agricultural and associated 
processing wastes. Special laboratory techniques required for the characterization 
of these wastes will be emphasized. Principles and examples considered will be 
utilized to develop waste management and nondestructive waste utilization systems 
that are integral to the total operation. Humenik 

BAE 585 (FS 585) Biorheology. Prerequisites: PY 205, EM 307. 3(2-2) Alternate 
S. The concepts of strain, stress and the mechanical viscoelastic properties of biolo- 
gical solids, fluids and slurries. The time-dependent deformation and flow of bio- 
materials elements of strength of materials, rheological equations and model con- 
cepts, creep-relaxation and dynamic behavior, contact problems and the Boltzman 
superposition principle as a function of time, temperature and moisture content. 

Hamann 
B.\E 590 Special Problems. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in agri- 
cultural engineering. Credits Arranged. Each student will select a subject on which 
he will do research and write a technical report on his results. He may choose a 
subject pertaining to his particular interest in any area of study in biological and 
agricultural engineering. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BAE 654 Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics in Bioengineering. Prerequisite: 
MA 511. 3(3-0) Alternate S. Generalized classical thermodynamics is extended by 
Onsager's relations to provide a theoretical basis for analyzing the energetics of 
systems that include life processes. Topics illustrate applications to special systems 
including isothermal diffusion and sedimentation, membrane permeability, trans- 
port processes in continuous systems, and systems with temperature gradients. 

Johnson 

BAE 661 Analysis of Function and Design of Biological and Physical Systems. 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3(2-3) Alternate F. Mathematical and analytical 
techniques and principles essential in the analysis and design of machines and 
systems which encompass both the biological and the physical domains and their 



78 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

interfaces. Analytical treatment of physical and biological systems and the func- 
tional analysis of machine components are studied to bridge the gap between 
theories and applications. Control systems synthesis and design are treated with 
emphasis on quantitative dynamic relations between elements and system response 
using transfer function and computer simulation techniques. Bowen, Huang 

BAE 671 (SSC 671) Theory of Drainage — Saturated Flow. Prerequisite: MA 
513. 3(3-0) Alternate F. Physical concepts and properties of fluids and porous media 
are discussed in relation to soil water movement. The fundamental laws and equa- 
tions governing saturated flow in porous media are derived and discussed. Mathe- 
matical solutions of steady-state and transient flow equations are analyzed to 
determine their applicability to drainage problems. Analogs and models of partic- 
ular drainage problems are considered. Skaggs 

BAE 674 (SSC 674) Theory of Drainage— Unsaturated Flow. Prerequisite: BAE 
671 or equivalent. 3(3-0) Alternate S. Forces involved and theories utilized in 
saturated flow of porous media are discussed in relation to soil moisture movement. 
Steady-state and transient unsaturated flow equations for horizontal and vertical 
moisture movement are developed and solved. The solutions are applied to present- 
day laboratory and field technology. Molecular diffusion and hydrodynamic 
dispersion are considered in light of current tracing techniques. Skaggs 

BAE 690 Special Topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credits Arranged, 1-4. 
A study of topics in the special fields of interest of graduate students under the 
direction of the g^raduate faculty. Graduate Staff 

BAE 695 Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in biological and agricultural 
engineering. 1(1-0) F,S. Elaboration of the subject areas, techniques and methods 
peculiar to professional interest through presentations of personal and published 
works; opportunity for students to present and critically defend ideas, concepts and 
inferences. Discussions to point up analytical solutions and analogies between 
problems in biological and agricultural engineering and other technologies, and to 
present the relationship of biolog:ical and agricultural engineering to the socio- 
economic enterprise. Rohrbach 

BAE 699 Research in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing in biological and agricultural engineering. Credits Arranged. 
Performance of a particular investigation of concern to biological and agricultural 
engineering. The study will begin with the selection of a problem and culminate 
with the presentation of a thesis. Graduate Staff 



Biological Sciences 

Professor J. L. Apple, Assistant Director of Academic Affairs and Research for the 
Biological Sciences 

Professor C. F. Lytle, Teaching Coordinator 

There is no graduate major per se in the biological sciences, but a number of 
interdepartmental instructional activities are coordinated through the School of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences. There are several courses at the graduate level 
which are interdepartmental or interdisciplinary in scope and which are applicable 
to several graduate major and minor programs. These courses are: 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 79 

BS 590 Special Problems in Biological Instrumentation. Prerequisite: Consent 
of instructor. This course comprises a series of instructional sections, each of five 
weeks duration, devoted to the principles and concepts of biological instrumentation. 
Each five-week instructional section carries one semester credit. Advanced under- 
graduate and graduate students may register for only one or up to three sections 
(total of three credits) per semester. The sections currently offered cover the fol- 
lowing topics: basic components of spectrophotometers including light sources, 
dispersing devices, detectors and read-out methods; theoretical and practical 
aspects of electron microscopy; basics of analog and digital computing methods 
and applications of computers to biological research; methods of separation and 
identification of biopolymers; principles of measurement; and the application of 
electronics in biologfical measuring and sensing devices. (For specific information 
on instructional sections offered, scheduling and instructors, contact the Biological 
Sciences Office.) 

BS 690 Seminar in Cell Biology. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, background 
in biology or chemistry. 1(1-0) S. A topical appraisal of the current literature in 
selected areas of cell biology through presentations and discussions by students, 
faculty and visiting scientists. 

BS 696 Topics in Biological Ultrastructure. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
(background preferably in biology). 1(1-0) F. A survey of the ultrastructure of 
living organisms from viruses to higher plants and animals by means of illustrated 
lectures. The changes in fine structure associated with differentiating cells and 
with cells in various metabolic states are examined. 



Biomathematics 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see statistics, 
page 251.) 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BMA 451 Mathematical Methods in Biology. Prerequisite: MA 112; two biology 
courses. Credit will not be allowed for majors in biomathematics, mathematics or 
statistics. 3(3-0) S. 

BMA 493 Special Topics in Biomathematics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
1-3 F,S. 

BMA 501 Theoretical Biochemistry I. Prerequisites: MA 405, CH 433, BCH 551 
or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. Application of physical theory and mathematics 
to biochemistry. Examination of basic principles of molecular theory, reaction rate 
theory, statistical mechanics and nonequilibrium thermodynamics as applied to 
biochanical systems. (Offered fall 1973 and alternate years.) Gold 

BMA 502 Theoretical Biochemistry II. Prerequisite: BMA 501. 3(3-0) S. Continu- 
ation of BMA 501. Coupling of diffusion and chemical reactions. Mathematical 
description of enzyme control, coupled sequences of enzyme reactions, feedback 
loops and oscillatory reactions. Experimentally oriented topics include theory of 
chemical relaxation and tracer dynamics. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) 

Gold 



80 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

BMA 571 (MA 571, ST 571) Biomathematics I. Prerequisites: Advanced cal- 
culus, reasonable background in biology or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. The role 
of theory construction and model building in the development of experimental 
science. Induction vs. deduction. The historical development of mathematical 
theories and models for the growth of one-species populations (logistic and off- 
shoots), including consideration of age distributions (matrix theory, Leslie and 
Lopez; continuous theory, Lotka). Some of the more elementary theories on the 
growth of organisms (von Bertalanffy, with applications to ecology; allometric 
theories, cultures grown in a chemostat). Mathematical theories of two and more 
species systems (predator-prey, competition, symbiosis; according to the Volterra- 
Lotka schemes, including present-day research), and discussion of some related 
models for chemical reaction kinetics. Much emphasis is placed on scrutiny of the 
biological concepts as well as of the mathematical structure of the models in order 
to uncover both weak and strong points of the models discussed. Mathematical 
treatment of the differential equations in these models stresses qualitative and 
geometric aspects. van der Vaart 

BMA 572 (MA 572, ST 572) Biomathematics H. Prerequisites: BMA 571, ele- 
mentary probability theory. 3(3-0) S. Continuation of topics of BMA 571. Some 
more advanced mathematical techniques concerning nonlinear differential equations 
of the types encountered in BMA 571: several concepts of stability, asymptotic 
directions, periodic models. Comparison of deterministic and stochastic models for 
several biological problems including birth and death processes. Certain aspects of 
linear system theory (time-invariant and variable models) used for the analysis of 
biological systems. Discussion of various applications of mathematics to biology, 
e.g., theories of aging, some recent research. van der Vaart 

BMA 591 Special Topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Maximum 3, 1-3 FS. 
Directed readings, problem sets, written and oral reports as dictated by need and 
interest of student; new 500-level courses during the developmental phase. 

Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BMA 691 Advanced Special Topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-3 F,S. 
Directed readings, problem sets, written and oral reports as dictated by need and 
interest of student; new 600-level courses during the developmental phase. 

Graduate Staff 

BMA 694 Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Prerequisite: 
Graduate students in biomathematics are expected to attend throughout the period 
of their residence. 

BMA 699 Research. Credits Arranged. F,S. 



Botany 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. R. Noggle, Head 

Professors: A. W. Cooper, (on leave), R. J. Downs, J. W. Hardin, J. R. Troyer; 
Professor USPS: A. Krochmal; Adjunct Professor: W. W. Heck; Professors 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 81 

Emeriti: D. B. Anderson, H. T. Sco field, B. W. Wells, L. A. Whitford; 
Associate Professors: C. E. Anderson, R. C. Fixes; Adjunct Associate Profes- 
sor USD A: D. W. DeJong; Associate Professors USD A: H. E. Pattee, H. 
Seltmann; Assistant Professors: U. Blum, E. D. Seneca, C. G. Van Dyke; 
Research Associate: R. L. Mott 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: B. J. Copeland, J. S. Kahn, R. J. Thomas, D. H. Timothy; Professor 
USDA: D. E. Mobeland 

The Department of Botany offers programs leading to the Master of Life Sciences 
(non-thesis). Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

Excellent physical facilities and equipment are available for instruction and 
research in all phases of the departmental program. The Phytotron (part of a two- 
unit controlled environment facility operated in collaboration with Duke Uni- 
versity) oflFers opportunities for research in experimental taxonomy, ecology, 
moi-phology and plant physiology. An electron microscope laboratory is available. 
The department supports a strong research program in cell and tissue culture. 
A herbarium supports studies in systematic botany, and is augmented by herbaria 
in the Departments of Botany at nearby Duke University and the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Field laboratories are available at the coast, in the 
Piedmont and in the mountains. The facilities of branch Agricultural Experiment 
Stations also are available for field research. The department participates in tropical 
biology programs through membership in the Organization for Tropical Studies. 

Air and water pollution research and training programs have been developed 
in the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the School of Engineering at 
North Carolina State University in collaboration with groups at Duke University, 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Environmental Protection 
Agency in the Research Triangle. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 400 Plant Diversity. Prerequisite: BO 200. 4(3-3) F. 

BO 402 (CS 402) Economic Botany. Prerequisite: BO 200. 3(2-3) S. 

BO 403 Systematic Botany. Prerequisite: BS 100 or BO 200. 4(2-4) S. 

BO 414 (ZO 414) Cell Biology. Prerequisites: CH 223, PY 212, ZO 201. 3(3-0) F. 

BO 421 Plant Physiology. Prerequisites: BS 100 or BO 200 and year of college 
chemistry. 4(3-3) F,S. 

BO 480 Air Pollution Biology. Prerequisites: An introductory biological course 
and chemistry, junior standing. 3(2-3) S. 

BO 499 Independent Study in Botany. Prerequisites: At least eight hours of 
botany, advanced standing, and presentation of plan of work approved by a faculty 
member. 1-3 F,S. 



82 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

BO 510 Plant Anatomy. Prerequisite: BO 200. 4(2-6) F. A study of the cells, 
tissues and organs of common flowering plants and gynmosperms. Growth and 
differentiation patterns will be considered with emphasis on current research. 

Anderson 

BO 522 Advanced Morphology and Phylogeny of Seed Plants. Prerequisite: BO 
403. 4(3-3) S. A comprehensive survey of the morphology and evolution of angio- 
sperms and gymnosperms. Special emphasis is given to detailed vegetative and 
reproductive morphology of fossil and living forms, and to their presumed evolution- 
ary relationships. (Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) Hardin 

BO 524 Grasses, Sedges, and Rushes. Prerequisite: BO 403. 4(2-6) F. A course 
dealing with three large, economically and ecologically important plant families. 
A working familiarity with these three groups will be achieved through an intro- 
duction to the special terminology used in dealing with these plants, extensive field 
work emphasizing keying out plants collected and a study of the recently developed 
modern classification of the grasses. (Offered 1973-74 and alternate years.) Staff 

BO 544 Plant Geography. Prerequisites: BO 403, BO 360 (ZO 360), GN 411 or 
equivalents. 3(3-0) S. A course in descriptive and interpretive plant geography, 
synthesizing data from the fields of ecology, genetics, geography, paleobotany and 
taxonomy. Includes a survey of the present distribution of major vegetation types 
throughout the world, a discussion of the history and development of this present 
pattern of vegetation and a discussion of the principles and theories of plant geo- 
graphy. (Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) Cooper 

BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I. Prerequisites: General botany or biology, 
and biochemistry. 3(3-0) F. The first half of a two-semester sequence covering the 
current status of plant physiology. Topics will include plant organization, metabo- 
lism, water relations, solute relations, photobiology and respiration. 

Troyer, Noggle 

BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II. Prerequisites: General botany or biology, 
and biochemistry. 3(3-0) S. The second half of a two-semester sequence covering the 
current status of plant physiology. Topics will include inorganic nutrition, nitrogen 
assimilation, plant growth substances, physiology of seeds, vegetative gfrowth, 
reproductive growth, aging and senescence. Noggle, Troyer 

BO 553 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology I. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
BO 551. 1(0-3) F. Laboratory to accompany BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I. 
Laboratory procedures in plant nutrition, plant structure and composition, water 
relations, respiration. Staff 

BO 554 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology II. Prerequisite or corequisite: 
BO 552. 1(0-3) S. Laboratory to accompany BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II. 
Laboratory procedures in enzymes, photosynthesis, photobiology, plant growth 
substances. Staff 

BO 560 (ZO 560) Principles of Ecology. Prerequisite: Three semesters of college 
level biology courses. 4(3-3) F. A consideration of the principles of ecology at the 
graduate level. Each of the major subject areas of ecology is developed in sufficient 
depths to provide a factual and philosophical framework for the understanding of 
ecology. Blum, Shaw 

BO 561 Physiology Ecology. Prerequisites: BO 421 and BO 560 (ZO 560) or 
equivalent. 4(3-3) S. This course will approach the plant community from a physio- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 83 

logical standpoint. Emphasis will be placed on the individual in the community and 
how it responds to its immediate environment on a short- and long-term basis. 
(Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) Blum 

BO 574 (MB 574) Phycology. Prerequisite: BS 100 or BO 200. 3(1-4) S. An 
introduction to the structure, reproduction and importance of organisms which 
may be included in the algae. Considerable time is devoted to the local freshwater 
and marine floras and the ecology of important species. Witherspoon 

BO 575 (MB 575, PP 575) The Fungi. Prerequisite: BO 200 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F. An overview of the fungi within the framework of a survey of the major 
classes. Lectures while covering the major groups systematically will also include 
ancillary material on aspects of ultrastructure, experimental adaptations, sexuality, 
ontogeny, and economic, including historical, importance. Van Dyke 

BO 576 (MB 576, PP 576) The Fungi— Lab. Corequisite: BO 575. 1(0-3) F. The 
course will provide illustrative material of the fungal assemblages discussed in 
BO 575. Van Dyke 

BO 590 Topical Problems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1-3 F,S. Discussions 
and readings on problems of current interest in the fields of ecology, anatomy and 
morphology, taxonomy, and cell biology. May be repeated with a change in topic 
for a maximum of six credits. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

BO 612 Plant Morphogenesis. Prerequisite: Six hours of botany equivalent to 
BO 400 and BO 421. 4(3-3) S. A review and synthesis of the factors involved in the 
development of plant form. Levels of control from the molecular to the whole organ- 
ism will be considered. (Offered 1973-74 and alternate years.) Anderson 

BO 620 Advanced Taxonomy, Prerequisite: BO 403. 3(2-2) S. A course in the 
principles of plant taxonomy including the history of taxonomy, systems of classifi- 
cation, rules of nomenclature, taxonomic literature, taxonomic and biosystematic 
methods, and monographic techniques. (Offered 1973-74 and alternate years.) 

Hardin 

BO 625 (PP 625) Advanced Mycology. 4(2-6) F. (See plant pathology, page 224.) 

BO 631 Water Relations of Plants. Prerequisite: BO 551 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 
A discussion of the physiological water relations of plants with emphasis on theo- 
retical principles and quantitative description. (Offered 1973-74 and alternate 
years.) Troyer 

BO 633 Plant Growth and Development. Prerequisites: BO 414 (ZO 414) or BO 
421, organic chemistry. 3(3-0) S. An advanced course in plant physiology covering 
plant growth, development, differentiation, senescence and biological control 
mechanisms. Fites 

BO 634 Introduction to the Thermodynamics of Biological Systems. Prerequisite: 
BO 551 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. An introductory development of the 
thermodynamic theory relevant to biological systems together with consideration of 
examples of biological problems to which thermodynamic theory has been applied. 
(Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) Troyer 

BO 636 Discussions in Plant Physiology. Prerequisites: BO 414 (ZO 414) or BO 



84 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

421, organic chemistry. 1(1-0) F,S. Group discussions at an advanced level of 
selected topics of current interest in plant physiology. Graduate Staff 

BO 660 (ZO 660) Advanced Topics in Ecology I. Prerequisite: BO 560 (ZO 560). 
4(3-3) S. A consideration in depth of the major fields of ecology. Subject matter will 
be developed through seminars and lectures based on classical and current litera- 
ture, and principles will be illustrated by laboratory exercises and field trips. 
Topics covered include microenvironment, community ecology, ecosystems and 
nutrient cycling. (Offered 1973-74 and alternate years.) 

BO 661 (ZO 661) Advanced Topics in Ecology II. 4(3-3) S. (See zoology, page 
279.) 

BO 691 Botany Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Scientific articles, progress reports in re- 
search and special problems of interest to botanists are reviewed and discussed. 
Graduate student credit is allowed if one paper per semester is presented at the 
seminar. Graduate Staff 

BO 693 Special Problems in Botany. Credits Arranged. Directed research in 
some specialized phase of botany other than a thesis problem, but designed to 
provide experience and training in research. Graduate Staff 

BO 699 Research. Credits Arranged. Original research preliminary to writing a 
master's thesis or a doctoral dissertation. Graduate Staff 



Cell Biology 

Many biologists seek a basic understanding of biological phenomena at the 
cellular and subcellular levels. They recognize that principles and concepts de- 
veloped in one cellular system may apply to a variety of organisms and may help 
to explain the activities of more highly organized systems such as organs and 
tissues. 

Biologists interested in this approach need a broader background than that 
generally provided by the customary major and minor. Such a background can be 
obtained through the Interdisciplinary Minor at North Carolina State University 
by selection of appropriate courses from the wide array available in the biological 
science departments at this institution, the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill and Duke University at Durhiim. 

Chemical Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. K. Ferrell, Head 

Professors: K. O. Beatty Jr., R. P. Gardner, D. C. Martin, E. M. Schoenborn, 
J. F. Seely, H. B. Smith, V. T. Stannett; Professor Emeritus: W. L. Mc- 
Cabe; Associate Professors: R. M. Felder, H. B. Hopfenberg, D. B. Mars- 
land, E. P. Stahel; Assistant Professors: M. R. Overcash, R. W. Rousseau 

The Department of Chemical Engineering offers programs of advanced study 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 85 

leading to the Miister of Science, Master of Chemical Engineering and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. Students entering graduate study in the department normally 
have a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering or its equivalent, but programs 
can be worked out to accommodate students with bachelor's degrees in applied 
mathematics, chemistry, physics and other branches of engineering. Entering 
students should have a background in undergraduate mathematics, physics and 
chemistry, including physical chemistry; and a background equivalent to under- 
graduate work in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and mass transfer and diffusional 
operations. Deficiencies in any of these areas can normally be made up in one 
semester. 

The most extensive area of research in the department is in the field of polymer 
science and engineering. Graduate and post-doctoral efforts in this field include 
studies of ionic and free-radical polymerization, grafting reactions, membrane 
technology and design of polymerization reactors. Other active research areas 
include chemical reaction engineering, heat and mass transfer, process optimization 
and control, particulate processes, pollution abatement and control, thermo- 
dynamics and biomedical engineering. 

The proximity of UNC-Chapel Hill and Duke University, as well as the Research 
Triangle Park which houses a number of government and industrial research 
facilities, lends considerable support to many of the research programs at North 
Carolina State University. The Environmental Protection Agency, for example, 
has a facility in the Research Triangle Park which provides a natural contact 
between government and university scientists studying air pollution problems. 

The Department of Chemical Engineering occupies 40,000 square feet in the 
east wing of Riddick Engineering Laboratories. Within the building there are 
several excellent general-puipose laboratory facilities for graduate research. The 
department also has several other special facilities including laboratories for process 
control and dynamics, theimodynamics, powder science and technology, desalina- 
tion and polymer research. In addition, three pilot plant systems have been built 
to study heat transfer, reaction kinetics and complex mixing phenomena in poly- 
merization systems. A well-equipped instrumental analysis laboratory is maintained 
within the depaitment; other specialized instruments such as electron beam and 
scanning microscopes are available on campus should a research project require 
their use. The School of Engineering computer facilities are conveniently housed 
within the chemical engineering wing of Riddick Hall. A new teiminal link to an 
IBM 370/165 computer located in the Research Triangle Park provides rapid 
service on almost all digital jobs. Additional digital capabilities are provided by an 
IBM 1130 computer whkrh is interfaced to an EAI TR 48 analog computer pro- 
viding a hybrid facility. Finally, a machine shop assures the student that almost 
any special equipment needed for research can be constructed within the depart- 
ment. 

A number of research projects within the department are supported by industry 
as well as state and federal agencies. Research assistantships for work on these 
specific projects are available and may be nine- or twelve-month appointments. 
The department also offers teaching assistantships which carry a nine-month 
stipend of $3,000. These are half-time appointments and usually involve assisting 
in the teaching of courses, supervising undergraduate laboratories or other labora- 



86 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

toiy work. In addition, the department hiis several industrially sponsored fellow- 
ships which require no specific duties. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 412 Transport Processes II. Prerequisite: CHE 327. 3(3-0) S. 

CHE 425 Process Measurement and Control I. Prerequisites: CHE 225, CHE 327. 

3(2-2) F. 

CHE 426 Process Measurement and Control II. Prerequisite: CHE 425 or EE 435 

or MAE 435. 3(2-2) S. 

CHE 428 Separation Processes II. Prerequisite: CHE 327. 3(3-0) S. 

CHE 431 Chemical Engineering Laboratory I. Prerequisite: CHE 311. 3(1-5) S. 

CHE 432 Chemical Engineering Laboratory II. Prerequisite: CHE 431. 3(1-5) F. 

CHE 446 Chemical Process Kinetics. Prerequisite: CHE 315. 3(3-0) F. 

CHE 451 Chemical Engineering Design. Prerequisites: CHE 315, CHE 327, CHE 
432. 3(2-2) F,S. 

CHE 465 (BAE 465) Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Prerequisites: 
MA 202 or MA 212, PY 212 or PY 221. 3(3-0) S. 

CHE 495 Seminar in Chemical Engineering. Prerequisite: One semester required 
of seniors in chemical engineering. 1(1-0) F,S. 

CHE 497 Chemical Engineering Projects. Elective for seniors in chemical 
engineering. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CHE 511 Problem Analysis for Chemical Engineers. Prerequisites: CHE 428, 
MA 301. 3(3-0) S. The application of the methods of mathematical analysis to the 
formulation and solution of problems in transport phenomena, transient phenomena 
in unit operations, process dynamics and thermodynamics. Study and use of analog 
computer solutions of these problems. Martin 

CHE 513 Thermodynamics I. Prerequisite: CHE 315. 3(3-0) F. An intermediate 
course in thermodynamic principles and their application to chemical and phase 
equilibria. The course is largely from a macroscopic viewpoint but consideration 
will be given to some aspects of the statistical viewpoint. Beatty 

CHE 515 Transport Phenomena. Prerequisite: CHE 327. 3(3-0) F. A theoretical 
study of transport of momentum, energy and matter with emphasis on the latter 
two. The diffusional operations, including coupled heat and mass transfer, are intro- 
duced in the light of the theory. Marsland 

CHE 517 Kinetics and Catalysis. Prerequisite: CHE 446. 3(3-0) F. An intensive 
study of homogeneous and heterogeneous kinetic reactions, rates and rate laws, 
experimental methods and mathematical techniques in engineering analysis of 
chemical reaction systems. Felder 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 87 

CHE 521 Mass Transfer Operations. Prerequisite: CHE 327 or equivalent 3(3-0) 
S. Multicomponent mass transfer operations will be discussed in light of recent de- 
velopments and innovations in both the operations themselves and in calculational 
techniques used in analyzing the operations. The equilibrium stage concept will be 
developed and as time permits, a discussion of the continuous rate processes will be 
undertaken. Problems unique to given operations, such as are encountered in extrac- 
tive and azeotropic distillation will be discussed during the course. Rousseau 

CHE 523 Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer. Prerequisite: CHE 311. 3(3-0) F. 
Convective heat transfers in chemical process equipment, such as heat exchangers, 
chemical reactors, distillation and extraction reboilers, etc., and fluid dynamics and 
heat transfer of multiphase, multicomponent and chemically reactive systems. 

Ferrell 

CHE 525 Process Dynamics. Prerequisite: CHE 425. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study 
of the dynamic response of typical chemical process equipment including instrumen- 
tation and process control devices. Fundamental concepts of automatic control of 
process variables such as temperature, pressure, flow and liquid level. Martin 

CHE 527 (OR 527) Optimization of Engineering Processes. Prerequisites: MA 
511, CSC 111 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A survey of mathematical methods for the op- 
timization of engineering processes. Emphasis on applications of the techniques dis- 
cussed rather than rigorous development of the theory. Felder 

CHE 535 Engineering Economy in Air Pollution Control Systems. Prerequisites: 
MAE 409, CE 576, or equivalent first course. 3(3-2) S. Principles and practice in 
designing equipment for the abatement of air pollution; estimation of capital 
cost and operating expense; economic optimization under various kinds of tax 
laws. Marsland 

CHE 541 Cellulose Industries. Prerequisite: Organic chemistry. 3(3-0) F. 
Methods of manufacture and application of cellulose chemical conversion products. 
Emphasis placed on recent developments in the field of synthetic fibers, film, 
lacquers and other cellulose compounds. Seely 

CHE 543 Technology of Plastics. Prerequisite: Organic chemistry. 3(3-0) S. 
The properties, methods of manufacture and applications of synthetic resins. 
Recent developments in the field are stressed. Schoenborn 

CHE 561 Biomedical Engineering I: Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer. Pre- 
requisites: CHE (BAE) 465, or equivalent background. 3(3-0) F. The extension 
of fluid flow and heat transfer concepts to biomedical engineering is presented 
along with the grounding in physiology requisite to proper modeling of mammalian 
flow and thermal processes. Cardio-vascular blood flow, pulmonary air flow and 
heat flow in temperature regulation are subjected to critical engineering analysis. 
Flows in the urinary, alimentary and lymphatic systems and in extracorporeal 
assist devices including the heart-lung machine and artificial kidney are also 
studied. Beatty 

CHE 596 (TC 569) Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. Prerequisites: 

CHE 315, CH 431, CH 223. 3(3-0) F. A survey of the relationship between molecular 
structure and bulk properties of nonmetallic materials as applied in chemical 
engineering processes. Special attention will be directed to the application of 
surface and colloid chemistry as well as polymer science. Hopfenberg 

CHE 597 Chemical Engineering Projects. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
1-3 F,S. A laboratory study of some phase of chemical engineering or allied 
field. Graduate Staff 



88 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CHE 598 Special Topics in Chemical Engineering. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 1-3 F,S. Study and investigation of special topics in chemical engineering. The 
course may consist of directed reading of the literature of chemical engineering, 
introduction to research methodology, special topics of current interest, seminar dis- 
cussions dealing with special topics, etc. Graduate Staff 



FOR GR.\DUATES ONLY 

CHE 611 Chemical Process Design and Simulation. Prerequisite: CHE 511. 
3(3-0) S. Application of process analysis, simulation and optimization techniques 
to case studies of complex chemical processes. Marsland 

CHE 613 Thermodynamics IL Prerequisite: CHE 513. 3(3-0) F. A consideration of 
various thermodynamic topics of special interest to chemical engineers. The effects 
of high pressures and high temperatures on equilibria, relationship of thermodyna- 
mics to rate process, thermodynamics of the steady state including coupled transfer 
process and experimental methods in thermodynamics would be typical. Beatty 

CHE 617 Chemical Reaction Engineering. Prerequisite: CHE 517. 3(3-0) S. 
An advanced study of ideal and real reactor systems. The approach employed is 
twofold: characterization of actual systems by empirical rate expressions coupled 
with fundamental analysis; simulation of coupled physical and chemical processes 
in a reactor by solution of various types of physical models. Stahel 

CHE 621 Advanced Mass Transfer. Prerequisite: CHE 515. 3(3-0) F. Application 
of transport theory and empirical devices to the analysis, synthesis and design of 
mass-transfer equipment. The operations of absorption, extraction, distillation, 
humidification and drying will be considered. Rousseau 

CHE 623 Advanced Fluid Dynamics. Prerequisites: CHE 515, CHE 523. 3(3-0) S. 
The principles of fluid dynamics and their application to laminar and turbulent flow, 
flow in closed channels, flow in packed beds and porous media, particle technology, 
industrial rheology and two-phase flow. Ferrell 

CHE 624 Advanced Heat Transfer. Prerequisite: CHE 515. 3(3-0) F. An advanced 
course dealing primarily with heat transfer between liquids and solids, optimum 
operating conditions and design of equipment, conduction, heating and cooling of 
solids, radiant heat transmission. Beatty 

CHE 669 (TC 669) Diffusion in Polymers. Prerequisite: CHE 569 or consent 
of instructor. 2(2-0) S. An up-to-date treatment of the theory and practice of small 
molecule transport in polymers as applied to the chemical, polymer, textile, coatings 
and natural fiber industries. Hopfenberg 

CHE 671 (TC 671) Special Topics in Polymer Science. Prerequisite: Consent 
of instructor. 1-3 F. An intensive treatment of selected topics in fiber and polymer 
science. Stannett 

CHE 693 Advanced Topics in Chemical Engineering. 1-3 F,S. A study of recent 
developments in chemical engineering theory and practice, such as ion exchange, 
crystallization, mixing, molecular distillation, hydrogenation, fluorination. The 
topic will vary from term to term. 

CHE 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Literature investigations and reports of special 
topics in chemical engineering and allied fields. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 89 

CHE 699 Research. Credits Arranged F,S. Independent investigation of 
an advanced chemical engineering problem. A report of such an investigation is 
required as a graduate thesis. Graduate Staff 



Chemistry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. L. Bumgardner, Acting Head 

Professors: H. A. Bent, L. H. Bowten, L. D. Freedman, F. W. Getzen, F. C. 
Hentz Jr., Z Zimmerman Hugus Jr., G. Levine, R. H. Loeppert — Assistant 
to Head, G. G. Long, W. J. Peterson, P. P. Sutton, W. P. Tucker — Director 
of Graduate Studies, R. C. White; Adjunct Professor. M, E. Wall; Profes- 
sors Emeriti: G. O. Doak, W. A. Reid; Associate Professors: J. Bordner, H. H. 
Carmichael, a. F. Coots, M. K. DeArmond, C. E. Gleit, L. A. Jones, M. L. 
Miles, C. G. Moreland, A. F. Schreiner, G. H. Wahl Jr.; Assistant Profes- 
sors: T. C. Caves, K. W. Hanck, T. M. Ward, D. W. Wertz 

The Department of Chemistry offers progiams leading to the Master of Science 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Major fields of specialization are analytical, 
inorganic, organic, nuclear and physical chemistry. A wide variety of advanced 
courses and a broad spectrum of research topics provide preparation for almost 
every type of position open to a chemist with an advanced degree. 

A student entering graduate work in chemistiy should have a bachelor's degree 
in chemistry or its equivalent. This includes the equivalent of one-year courses in 
general, organic, physical and analytical chemistry, and a semester of inorganic 
chemistry. At least one year of college physics and two years of mathematics, 
including differential equations, are necessary. Students who fail to meet these 
requirements may in some cases be admitted on a provisional basis. 

With a large graduate faculty and favorable graduate student to feculty ratio, the 
chemistry department emphasizes individual attention, small classes and personal 
collaboration on research with faculty members. Among the variety of active 
research projects available for thesis work are organic and inorganic synthesis, 
structure and properties of organometallic compounds and transition metal com- 
plexes, stereochemistry of natural and synthetic products, kinetics and mechanisms 
of reactions, radiochemistry, microanalysis, electrochemistry, quantum chemistry, 
and infiared, Raman, Mossbauer, nuclear magnetic resonance, nuclear quadrupole 
resonance and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. 

The department is equipped with standard instruments and apparatus for 
teaching and research. Many items of specialized equipment are available, 
including recording spectrophotometers covering the range from far infrared to 
ultraviolet, three nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers, gas chromatographs, 
mass spectrometer, electron spin resonance spectrometer, circular dichroism 
recorder and spectropolarimeter, nuclear quadrupole resonance spectrometer, 
Mossbauer spectrometer and X-ray difiractometer. A complete glassblowing 



90 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

facility manned by a glassblower is available for constructing special apparatus. 
All research activities of the department are concentrated in a new nine-story 
laboratory building equipped with modern, spacious facilities and completely 
air-conditioned. 

The department has available for qualified applicants teaching and research 
assistantships, as well as a number of fellowships. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry. Corequisite: CH 433. 3(3-0) S. 

CH 411 Analytical Chemistry I. Prerequisite: CH 434. 4(2-6) F. 

CH 413 Analytical Chemistry II. Prerequisite: CH 411. 4(2-6) S. 

CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis. Prerequisite: CH 223. 3(1-6) F,S. 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I. Prerequisites: CH 107, MA 202, PY 203 or PY 208; 
Corequisite: MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CH 432 Physical Chemistry I Laboratory. Corequisite: CH 431. 1(0-3) F. 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II. Prerequisites: CH 431, MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CH 434 Physical Chemistry II Laboratory. Corequisite: CH 433. 2(0-6) S. 

CH 435 Physical Chemistry III. Prerequisites: CH 431, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. 

CH 441 Colloid Chemistry. Prerequisites: CH 220, CH 315. 3(2-3) S. 

CH 461 (TC 461) Chemistry of Fibers. 3(34)) F. (See textile chemistry page 262.) 

CH 490 Chemical Preparations. Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry. 3(1-6) 
F.S. 

CH 491 Reading in Honors Chemistry. Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry. 
2-6 F,S. 

CH 493 Chemical Literature. Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry. 1(1-0) F. 

CH 495 Special Topics in Chemistry. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 1-3. 

CH 499 Senior Research in Chemistry, Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry. 
1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CH 501 Inorganic Chemistry I. Prerequisite: CH 433. 3(3-0) F. The study of 
modern inorganic chemistry from the point of view of the chemical bond, molecular 
structure, and spectroscopy. The course is built upon several topics chosen from 
gfroup theory, molecular symmetry, molecular orbital and crystal field theories, 
electronegativity, solid state, magnetic properties, electronic absorption, ORD, CD, 
and MCD, Mossbauer, nmr, nqu, ESC A, photoelectron, and vibrational spectro- 
scopies. Computer facilities are also used. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 91 

CH 503 Inorganic Chemistry II. Prerequisite: CH 501. 3(3-0) S. This course is a 
continuation of CH 501 and rests heavily upon the latter. Knowledge of physical 
methods of investigation is employed in order to understand the basis and 
systematize the chemistry of representative elements, transition metals (3d, 4d, 5d), 
lanthanides, and actinides. Methods of synthesis are discussed and reasons for their 
success given, and for these reasons areas of discussion are chosen from nonaqueous 
solvents, acids and bases, inorganic reaction mechanisms of importance or 
contemporary interest, solid state reactions, coordination chemistry including 
chelates and organometallic compounds, crystal field stabilization energy, 
Jahn-Teller and trans effects stabilization of valence states, and some bio-inorganic 
chemistry. 

CH 511 Chemical Spectroscopy. Prerequisite: CH 433. 3(3-0) F. Theory, analytical 
applications and interpretation of spectra as applied to chemical problems. Major 
emphasis will be placed upon ultraviolet, visible and infrared spectra. 

CH 515 Chemical Instrumentation. Prerequisite: CH 431; Corequisite: CH 411. 
3(3-0) S. Basic electronic components and circuits, the response of laboratory 
instruments, design and modification of typical electronic control and measurement 
systems. Emphasis will be placed on the transducers and control elements utilized 
in chemical research. 

CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. Prerequisite: CH 315 
or CH 331 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. The principles and applications of 
currently used methods of trace analysis are presented. Designed for students with 
little or no experience in trace analysis but with a strong interest in or need for 
analytical data at the trace level. Topics include pulse polarography, potentiometry, 
UV-Vis spectrophotometry, atomic absorption, emission spectrometry, fluorescence, 
neutron activation analysis, and spark source mass spectrometry. 

CH 518 Trace Analysis Laboratory. Corequisite: CH 517 or consent of instructor. 
2(0-6) F. The trace element content of samples is determined by a variety of 
instrumental techniques including UV-Vis spectrophotometry, fluorescence, 
emission spectrometry, atomic absorption, pulse polarography, and neutron 
activation analysis. 

CH 521 Advanced Organic Chemistry I. Prerequisites: CH 223, CH 433 or CH 
435. 3(3-0) F. Structure, stereochemistry and reactions of the various classes of 
hydrocarbons. The molecular orbital treatment of bonding and reactivity of alkenes, 
the conformational interpretation of cycloalkane and cycloalkene reactivity, and the 
application of optical isomerism to the study of reaction mechanisms will be 
emphasized. 

CH 523 Advanced Organic Chemistry II. Prerequisite: CH 521. 3(3-0) S. An 
introduction to acid-base theory and mechanistic organic chemistry as applied to 
synthetically useful organic reactions. 

CH 525 Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry. Prerequisites: CH 223 and 
CH 433 or CH 435. 3(3-0) S. Application of physical methods to the solution of 
structural problems in organic chemistry. Emphasis will be on spectral methods 
including infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, 
electron paramagnetic resonance. X-ray and electron diffraction, and optical 
rotatory dispersion. 

CH 531 Chemical Thermodynamics. Prerequisites: CH 433, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. An 
extension of elementary principles to the treatment of ideal and real gases, ideal 
solutions, electrolytic solutions, galvanic cells, surface systems and irreversible 



92 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

processes. An introduction to statistical thermodynamics and the estimation of 
thermodynamic functions from spectroscopic data. 

CH 533 Chemical Kinetics. Prerequisites: CH 433, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. An intensive 
survey of the basic principles of chemical kinetics with emphasis on experimental 
and mathematical techniques, elements of the kinetic theory, and theory of the 
transition state. Applications to gas reactions, reactions in solution and mechanism 
studies. 

CH 535 Surface Phenomena. Prerequisites: CH 433, MA 301. 3(3-0) S. An 
intensive survey of the topics of current interest in surface phenomena. Formu- 
lations of basic theories are presented together with illustrations of their current 
applications. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) 

CH 537 Quantum Chemistry. Prerequisites: MA 301, CH 435, or PY 407. 3(3-0) S. 
The elements of wave mechanics applied to stationary energy states and time 
dependent phenomena. Applications of quantum theory to chemistry, particularly 
chemical bonds. 

CH 545 Radiochemistry. Prerequisite: PY 410 or CH 431. 3(2-3) S. The applica- 
tions of radioactivity to chemistry and the applications of chemistry to the radio- 
active elements, particularly the transuranium elements and fission products. 

CH 562 (TC 562) Physical Chemistry of High Polymers-Bulk Properties. 3(3-0) F. 

(See textile chemistry, page 262.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CH 623 Valence and the Structure of Organic Molecules. Prerequisites: CH 523, 
CH 433. 3(3-0) F. Applications of molecular orbital theory, thermodynamics and free 
energy relations to organic problems. 

CH 625 Organic Reaction Mechanisms. Prerequisites: CH 523, CH 433. 3(3-0) S. 
A study of the effects of structure and substituents on the direction and rates of 
organic reactions. 

CH 627 Chemistry of Metal-Organic Compounds. Prerequisite: CH 521. 3(3-0) F. 
Preparation, properties and reactions of compounds containing the carbon-metal 
bond, with a brief description of their uses. 

CH 631 Chemical Thermodynamics II. Prerequisite: CH 531. 3(3-0) S. Statistical 
interpretation of thermodynamics; use of partition functions; introduction to 
quantum statistics; application of statistical mechanics to chemical problems, 
including calculation of thermodynamic properties, equilibria and rate processes. 

CH 659 (BCH 659) Natural Products. Prerequisites: CH 523, CH 525 or consent 
of instructor. 3(3-0) F. Illustrative studies of structure determination, synthesis 
and biosynthesis of natural substances. Modern physical methods and fundamental 
chemical concepts are stressed. Examples are chosen from such classes as alkaloids, 
terpenes, steroids and antibiotics. 

CH 691 Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in chemistry. 1(1-0) F,S. 
Scientific articles, progress reports on research, and special problems of interest 
to chemists are reviewed and discussed. 

CH 693 Advanced Topics in Physical Chemistry. Prerequisite: Two of the 
following: CH 531, 533, 535, 537. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive treatment of selected 
topics of importance in current physiochemical research. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 93 

CH 695 Special Topics in Chemistry. Prerequisite: Consent of department head. 
Maximum 3. F,S. Critical study of special problems in one of the branches of 
chemistry. 

CH 699 Chemical Research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in chemistry. 
Credits Arranged. F,S. Special problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 
A maximum of six semester credits is allowed toward a master's degree; there is 
no limitation on credits in the doctoral program. 



Civil Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. L. Dean, Head 

Professor P. Z. Zia, Associate Head 

Professors: M. Amein, W. F. Babcock, C. R. Bramer, P. D. Cribbins, J. F. Ely, 
R. E. FADVM-Dean, School of Engineering, C. L. Heimbach, J. W. Horn, 
A. -A. I. Kashef, L. J. Langfelder, W. G. Mullen, C. Smallwood Jr., 
M. E. Uyanik, H. E. Wahls — Graduate Administrator; Adjunct Professor; 
C. L. Mann Jr.; Associate Professors: W. S. Galler, K. S. Havner, J. F. 
MiRZA, C. C. Tung; Adjunct Associate Professors: C. P. Fisher Jr., S. D. 
Shearer Jr.; Assistant Professors: N. V. Colston Jr., W. J. Head, J. L. 
Machemehl, J. C. Smith 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers programs of study leading to Master 
of Civil Engineering, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The 
Master of Civil Engineering degree requires additional course work in lieu of a 
thesis and the student must pass comprehensive written and oral examinations. 
Students may major in soil mechanics and foundation engineering, structural 
engineering and mechanics, transportation engineering or sanitary and water 
resources engineering. 

The faculty is actively engaged in a broad area of research including determin- 
istic and probabilistic structural theories and mechanics, fundamental behavior of 
soils and structures, highway safety, land use and urban planning, hydrauUcs and 
hydrology, materials, waste disposal and pollution control. Many of the investiga- 
tions, conducted in well-equipped laboratories, are sponsored by industries and 
federal and state agencies including the continuing North Carolina Cooperative 
Highway Research Program. Graduate students are assigned adequate office and 
laboratory spaces for study and research. 

The department cooperates with other divisions of the University in a number of 
joint programs. Qualified students may schedule their courses in this department 
and in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill to receive a dual degree, a Master of Science with a 
major in transportation engineering and a Master of Regional Planning. Multidis- 
ciplinary study and research programs are also available through the North 
Carolina Highway Safety Research Institute, Water Resources Research Institute 
and the Center for Marine and Coastal Studies. 



94 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Students in other disciplines find opportunities for developing minor areas of 
study within the fiamework of course offerings of the department. In particular, 
courses of instruction in stream sanitation and industrial waste disposal provide the 
types of training in pollution often in great demand by industry. 

A brochure and supplementary information, describing in greater detail the 
opportunities for graduate study and research as well as assistantships and 
fellowships in the Department of Civil Engineering, are available upon request 
from the head of the department. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 406 Transportation Engineering 11. Prerequisite: CE 305. 3(2-2) F. 

CE 415, 416 (ARC 415, 416) Architectural Structures I,II. Prerequisites: (415): 
ARC (EM) 316; (416): ARC (EM) 415. Not open to civil engineering students. 
3(2-3) F,S. 

CE 425 Intermediate Structural Analysis. Prerequisite: CE 325. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 427 Structural Engineering II. Prerequisite: CE 326. 3(2-3) F. 

CE 443 Soil Engineering II. Prerequisite: CE 342. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 450 Civil Engineering Design. Prerequisite: One from CE 406, CE 427, 
CE 443, or CE 484. 3(1-6) S. 

CE 460 Construction Engineering Project. Prerequisites: CE 463, CE 466. 
3(2-3) S. 

CE 463 Cost Analysis and Control. Prerequisite: CE 365. 3(2-3) F. 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 466 Construction Engineering II. Prerequisites: CE 326, CE 365. 3(2-3) F. 

CE 472 Elements of Air Quality Management. Prerequisite: College-level physics 
and senior standing. 3(2-3) S. 

CE 484 Water Resources Engineering II. Prerequisite: CE 383. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 486 Sanitary Engineering Measurements of Water Quality. Prerequisite: 
Freshman chemistry and senior standing in the School of Engfineering or the School 
of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

CE 487 (OY 487, MAS 487) Physical Oceanography. (See physical oceano- 
graphy, page 214.) 3(3-0) S. 

CE 498 Special Problems in Civil Engineering. Prerequisite: Senior standing in 
inCEorCEC. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis I. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 3(2-3) F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 95 

Principles and concepts for engineering evaluation of aerial photographs, including 
analysis of soils and surface drainage characteristics. Wahls 

CE 508 Airphoto Analysis II. Prerequisite: CE 507. 3(2-3) S. Continuation of 
CE 507 with applications to highway and airport projects. Wahls 

CE 509 Photogrammetry. Prerequisite: CE 201 or CE 301. 3(2-3) F. Elements 
of aerial photogrrammetry as applied to civil engineering, surveying and mapping, 
geometry of aerial photographs, flight planning for aerial photography and 
stereoscopic plotter instruments, especially the Kelsh Plotter. Staff 

CE 514 Municipal Engineering Projects. Prerequisite: Senior standing in CE or 
CEC. 3(2-3) S. Special problems relating to public works, public utilities, urban 
planning and city engineering. Babcock, Horn 

CE 515 Transportation Operations. Prerequisite: CE 305. 3(3-0) F. The analysis 
of traffic and transportation engineering operations. Heimbach, Horn 

CE 516 Transportation Design. Prerequisite: CE 305. 3(2-3) S. The geometric 
elements of traffic and transportation engineering design. Cribbins, Horn 

CE 517 Water Transportation. Prerequisite: CE 305. 3(3-0) F. The planning, 
design, construction and operation of waterways, ports, harbors and related 
facilities. Development of analytical techniques for evaluating the feasibility of 
piers, ports and multipurpose river basin projects. The design of marine structures 
and civil works that are significant in civil engineering, including locks, dams, 
harbors, ports, and contractive and protective works. Cribbins 

CE 524 Analysis and Design of Masonry Structures. Corequisite: CE 427. 
3(3-0) F. Theory and design of masonry arches, culverts, dams, foundations and 
masonry walls subjected to lateral loads. Bramer, Mirza 

CE 525, 526 Matrix Structural Analysis I, II. Prerequisite: (525): CE 425; 
(526): CE 326. 3(3-0) F,S. Matrix methods of structural analysis for digital com- 
puter solutions for general plane frames, trusses, and grids as well as general three 
dimensional trusses and frames. Inclusion of effects due to prestrain, temperature, 
elastic stability functions, joint deformations, and support settlements. Introduc- 
tion to finite-element analysis of plane elasticity problems. Dean, Smith 

CE 531 Structural Models. Prerequisite: CE 427. 3(2-3) F. Dimensional analysis 
and structural similitude, indirect and direct models, model materials and experi- 
mental techniques, individual project in structural model analysis. 

Bramer, Mirza, Zia 

CE 534 Plastic Analysis and Design. Prerequisite: CE 427. 3(3-0) S. Theory of 
plastic behavior of steel structures; concept of design for ultimate load and the 
use of load factors. Analysis and design of components of steel frames including 
bracings and connections. Bramer 

CE 536 Theory and Design of Prestressed Concrete. Corequisite: CE 427. 3(3-0) F. 
The principles and concepts of design in prestressed concrete including elastic and 
ultimate strength analyses for flexure, shear, bond and deflection. Principles of 
concordancy and linear transformation for indeterminate prestressed structures. 
Application of prestressing to tanks and shells. Mirza, Zia 

CE 541 (MAS 541, OY 541) Gravity Wave Theory I. 3(3-0) S. (See physical ocea- 
nography, page 214.) 



96 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering. Prerequisite: CE 342. 3(3-0) S. Subsoil investi- 
gations; excavations; design of sheeting and bracing systems; control of water; 
footing, grillage and pile foundations; caisson and cofferdam methods of con- 
struction. Kashef, Langfelder 

CE 547 Fundamentals of Soil Mechanics. Prerequisite: EM 301. 3(3-0) F,S. Phy- 
sical and mechanical properties of soils governing their use for engineering 
purposes; stress relations and applications to a variety of fundamental problems. 

Wahls 

CE 548 Engineering Properties of Soils I. Prerequisite: CE 342. 3(2-3) F. The 
study of soil properties that are significant in earthwork engineering, including 
properties of soil solids, basic physiochemical concepts, classification, identification, 
plasticity, permeability, capillarity and stabilization. Laboratory work includes 
classification, permeability and compaction tests. Kashef, Langfelder 

CE 549 Engineering Properties of Soils II. Prerequisite: CE 548. 3(2-3) S. Con- 
tinuation of CE 548, including the study of compressibility, stress-strain relations 
and shear strength theories for soil. Laboratory work includes consolidation and 
shear strength tests. Langfelder 

CE 551 Theory of Concrete Mixtures. Prerequisite: CE 332. 3(3-0) F. A study in 
depth of the theory of portland cement concrete mixtures including types and 
properties of portland special cements; chemical reactions; brief examination of 
history of mixture design; detailed study of current design methods; properties of 
fresh and hardened concretes; strength -age-curing relationships; durability; ad- 
mixtures; special concretes; production and quality control. Mullen 

CE 553 Asphalt and Bituminous Materials. Prerequisite: CE 332. 3(2-3) F. A 
study in depth of properties of asphalts and tars for use in waterproofing and 
bituminous materials, and theories of design of bituminous mixtures for construction 
and paving uses including types and properties of asphalt cements, cutbacks, 
emulsions, blown asphalts and tars; brief examination of historical developments; 
detailed study of properties and design of bituminous mixtures; and cui-rent re- 
search. Laboratory work includes standard tests on asphalts, tars, and road oils; 
design, manufacture and testing of trial batches; and current research tenchiques. 

Head, Mullen 

CE 555 Highway and Airport Pavement Design. Prerequisite: CE 406 or CE 443. 
3(2-3) S. Theoretical analysis and design of highway and airport pavements with 
critical evaluation of current design practices. Head 

CE 570 (BAE 570, MB 570) Sanitary Microbiology. Prerequisite: MB 401 or 
equivalent. 3(2-3) S. Fundamental aspects of microbiology and biochemistry are 
presented and related to problems of stream pollution, refuse disposal and biological 
treatment. Laboratory exercises present basic microbiological techniques and 
illustrate from a chemical viewpoint some of the basic microbial aspects of waste 
disposal. Humenik 

CE 571 Theory of Water and Waste Treatment. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
3(3-0) F. Study of the physical, chemical and biological principles underlying water 
and waste treatment processes, including diffusion of gases, solubility, equilibrium 
and ionization, aerobic and anaerobic stabilization processes, sludge conditioning 
and disposal. Galler 

CE 572 Unit Operations and Processes in Wastes Engineering. Prerequisite: CE 
571. 3(1-6) S. Processes and operations in wastes engineering, including sedi- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 97 

mentation, coagulation, filtration, adsorption, biological treatments, softening and 
new developments. Colston 

CE 573 Analysis of Water and Wastes, Corequisite: CE 571. 3(1-6) F. Chemical 
and physical analysis of water and wastes and interpretation of results. Colston 

CE 574 (NE 574) Environmental Consequences of Nuclear Power. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. An examination of the environmental consequences 
resulting from the siting, construction and operation of nuclear power plants as well 
as the environmental consequences of alternatives to nuclear power. Fuel sources; 
fuel reprocessing; sources and treatment of solid, liquid, gaseous wastes; the costs 
of minimizing wastes and the effects of rejected heat; beneficial uses of rejected 
heat; pertinent federal and state regulations are examined. Smallwood 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems. Prerequisite: MA 405. 3(3-0) S. An examina- 
tion of civil engineering systems and their design optimization. The systems to be 
studied include water resources engineering, structural engineering, transportation 
engineering and construction. Galler 

CE 576 Atmospheric Pollution. Prerequisite: Graduate or advanced undergraduate 
standing. 3(3-0) S. A survey of the problem of atmospheric pollution. Topics to be 
discussed include: pollutant sources; effects on man and other animals, vegetation, 
materials and visibility; meteorological factors, air sampling; control devices; air 
quality and emission standards; and legal economic and administrative aspects. 

Graduate Staff 

CE 578 (BAE 578) Agricultural Waste Management. 3(2-3) F. (See biological and 

agricultural engineering, page 77.) 

CE 580 Flow in Open Channels. Prerequisite: CE 382. 3(3-0) F,S. The theory and 
applications of flow in open channels, including dimensional analysis, momentum- 
energy principle, gradually varied flow, high-velocity flow, energy dissipators, 
spillways, waves, channel transitions and model studies. Amein 

CE 581 (MAS 581) Introduction to Oceanographic Engineering. Prerequisite: 
CE 382. 3(3-0) F. A rigorous treatment of the engineering aspects of physical oceano- 
graphy. The theory for the propagation of waves, methods of wave forecasting and 
the analysis of wave spectra are presented. The applications of physical oceano- 
graphy to the design of marine and coastal installations are shown. 

Amein, Machemehl 

CE 591, 592 Civil Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussions and reports of 
subjects in civil engineering and allied fields. Graduate Staff 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects. 1-6 F,S. Special projects in some phase of 
civil eng^ineering. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CE 601 Transportation Planning. Prerequisite: CE 515. 3(3-0) S. The planning, 
administration, economics and financing of various transportation engineering 
facilities. Cribbins 

CE 602 Advanced Transportation Design. Prerequisite: CE 516. 3(2-3) F. Design 
of major traffic and transportation engineering projects. Horn 



98 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 603 Airport Planning and Design. Corequisite: CE 515. 3(2-3) F. The analysis, 
planning and desig^n of air transportation facilities. Cribbins, Horn 

CE 604 Urban Transportation Planning. Prerequisite: CE 515. 3(3-0) S. Planning 
and design of urban transportation systems as related to comprehensive urban 
planning; principles of land use planning, urban thoroughfare planning and regional 
planning. Heimbach, Horn 

CE 605 Traffic Flow Theory. Prerequisites: CE 515, ST 515. 3(3-0) F. The theo- 
retical techniques used to describe vehicular traffic movement on a street or high- 
way network, including the use of differential -difference equations, hydro-dynamic 
models, probabilistic models, and computer simulation. Heimbach 

CE 624 Analysis and Design of Structural Shells and Folded Plates. Prerequisites: 
CE 525, EM 511. 3(3-0) S. Treatment of roof structures in the form of folded and 
curved surfaces. Membrane and bending stress analysis of folded plates, shells of 
revolution, cylindrical and conical shells and free-form systems. Numerical and 
closed form solutions. Desig^n criteria for concrete and metallic structures. 

Dean, Havner, Uyanik 

CE 625, 626 Advanced Structural Design I, II. Prerequisite: (625): CE 427, CE 
525; Corequisites: (626): CE 525, CE 526. (625): 3(3-0), (626): 3(2-3) F,S. Complete 
structural design of a variety of projects including comparative study of alternative 
structural systems, synthesis and optimization. Uyanik 

CE 627 Analysis and Design of Structures for Dynamic Loads. Prerequisites: 
CE 526, EM 555. 3(3-0) S. Response of structural systems to dynamic loads; review 
of principles of dynamic analysis; computation of structural response by numerical 
methods, nonlinear elastic and inelastic response of structures. Vibration of 
bridges under moving traffic loads. Dynamic effects of blast, earthquake and wind 
loads on structures. Tung 

CE 631 Field Analysis of Structural Systems, Prerequisite: CE 525. 3(3-0) F. 
Primarily an exposition of the techniques of discrete field mechanics for the analysis 
of structures. Emphasis is on the closed-form analysis of regular structural lattices 
or nets and ribbed or reinforced continuous systems. Additional topics include: a 
cursory study of special continuous field solutions; and openform solutions for 
irregular systems. Dean 

CE 635 Advanced Theory of Concrete Structures. Prerequisite: CE 536. 3(3-0) S. 
Inelastic theory of structural concrete members under flexure, axial load, combined 
flexure and axial compression, shear and torsion. Yield line theory of slabs. Limit 
analysis of beams and frames of reinforced and prestressed concrete. Zia 

CE 641, 642 Advanced Soil Mechanics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Theories of soil mechanics; failure conditions; mechanical interaction between 
solids and water, and problems in elasticity and plasticity pertaining to earthwork 
engineering. Wahls 

CE 643 Hydraulics of Ground Water. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Principles of ground water hydraulics; theory of flow through idealized porous 
media; the flow net solution; seepage and well problems. Kashef 

CE 644 Ground Water Engineering. Prerequisite: CE 643 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 
Ground water problems as related to engineering works, ground water circulation 
and inventories, subsidence of the ground and its evaluation due to pumping, 
method of images applied to water circulation of wastes and salt water encroach- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 99 

ment in coastal aquifers, transient flow systems in wells and earth dams and 
embankments. Leakage problems, practical ground water problems and their 
analysis by computers and electrical models. The legal aspects of ground water 
conservation and the implied technical and eng:ineering phases. Kashef 

CE 646 Dynamics of Soils and Foundations, Prerequisite: CE 641. 3(3-0) F. The 
application of vibration and wave propagation theories to soil media; the review of 
existing experimental data and empirical procedures for analysis of foundation 
vibrations , the prediction of soil responses to impulse loads, dynamic properties of 
soils and methods for their determination, desig^n procedures for foundation sub- 
jected to dynamic forces. Wahls 

CE 651 Theory of Limit Analysis. Prerequisite: CE 526 or EM 551. 3(3-0) F. 
General theorems of limit analysis and shakedown in elastic-plastic structures. 
Applications to frames (cyclic loading), grids, arches, plates and shells. Introduction 
to plastic instability and impact loading. Havner 

CE 652 Inelastic Solids and Structures. Prerequisites: EM 503 or EM 501 and 

MA 405 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Mechanisms of slip in metals, Schmid's law; general 
theories of a polycrystalline aggregate. Phenomenological yield and hardening 
laws; comparisons with experiment. Extremum principles and formulation of bound- 
ary value problems; numerical methods of plastic strain analysis in two and three 
dimensions. Introduction to finite deformation theory. Havner 

CE 661 Numerical Methods in Structural Mechanics. Prerequisites: CE 525 and 
EM 551 or EM 503. 3(3-0) F. Finite difference and finite element methods in two 
and three dimensional elastic structures, including plates, plane stress and plane 
strain problems, axisymmetric solids. Analytical basis of approximations: series 
expansions; energy theorems; virtual work. Matrix decompositions and iteration 
techniques for digital computer solution. Introduction to nonlinear analysis. 

Havner 

CE 662 Probabilistic Methods of Structural Engineering. Prerequisites: CE 525 
and MA 421. 3(3-0) F. Application of probability theory and stochastic processes 
to the study of safety of structures. Fundamentals of probability theory and stochas- 
tic processes; probabilistic modelings of structural loadings, material properties and 
risk. Reliability analysis of structures; reliability-based design criteria. Random vi- 
bration of simple structures; safety analysis of structures under dynamic loads. 

Tung 

CE 671 Advanced Water Supply and Waste Water Disposal. Prerequisite: CE 484. 
4(3-3) F. Problems relating to water supply and waste collection. Galler 

CE 672 Advanced Water and Wastes Treatment. Prerequisite: CE 484. 4(3-3) S. 
Problems relating to the treatment of water and wastes. Galler 

CE 673 Industrial Water Supply and Waste Disposal. Corequisite: CE 571.- 
3(3-0) F,S. Water requirements of industry and the disposal of industries wastes. 

Smallwood 

CE 674 Stream Sanitation. Corequisite: CE 571. 3(3-0) F,S. Biological, chemical 
and hydrological factors that affect stream sanitation and stream use. Smallwood 

CE 698 Special Topics in Civil Engineering. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
1-3 F,S. The study of special advanced topics of particular interest in various areas 
of civil engineering. Graduate Staff 



100 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

CE 699 Civil Engfineering Research. Credits Arranged F,S. Independent investi- 
gation of an advanced civil engineering problem; a report of such an investigation 
is required as a graduate thesis. Graduate Staff 



Computer Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Assistant Professor N. F. Wiluamson, Acting Head 

Professors: P. E. Lewis, D. A. Link, L. B. Martin, Director of the Computing 
Center and Assistant Provost for University Computing; Associate Professors: 
D. R. Deuel, Y. N. Patt; Assistant Professors: S. D. Danielopoulos, R. J. 
FoRNARO, J. W. Hanson, T. L. Honeycutt, W. E. Robbins, A. L. Tharp 

The Department of Computer Science oflFers a minor program for graduate stu- 
dents majoring in any other field. A student wishing to minor in computer science 
should have a knowledge of a programming language as a prerequisite and should 
anticipate a research project involving computers as an integral part. For a student 
who is candidate for a master's degree, three courses at the 400 level or above 
are required, and the student is encouraged that at least one be at the 500 level 
or above. The student's advisory c-ommittee, which should include at least one 
member from the Computer Science Department, will assist in selecting a mean- 
ingful sequence of courses. For a student who is a candidate for a Ph.D., no specific 
courses are required, but the student is expected to achieve a high level of profici- 
ency in at leixst one of these five areas of computer science: 

Artificial Intelligence 

Computer Organiziition 

Numerical Analysis 

Programming Languages (including compiler design) 

Operating Systems 

The Computer Science Department has established cooperative programs — one 
with the Chemical Engineering Department and one with the Operations Research 
Committee — leading to a master's degree in either chemical engineering or opera- 
tions research with a major emphasis in computer science. The requirements for 
these Master of Science degrees, which include a thesis, are satisfied in such a way 
that a strong emphasis is placed on computer science in both course and research 
work. 

Students admitted to these cooperative programs are expected to satisfy all 
requirements for admission to the Graduate School. In addition, they should have 
a strong background in mathematics, statistics or the physical sciences, and a 
working knowledge of a versatile, higher-level programming language, such as 
ALGOL or PL/1. Those students who do not have the necessary background will 
be required to take courses eliminating the deficiencies in addition to a normal 
program of study. A few research and teaching assistantships are available to 
qualified applicants fi-om the cooperative programs each year. 

Additional information regarding the cooperative programs may be obtained by 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 101 

writing: Computer Science Department, P. O. Box 5972, Raleigh, North CaroHna 
27607. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CSC 411 Introduction to Simulation. Prerequisite: MA 312 and ST 371 or equiva- 
lent. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 412 Introduction to Computability, Language and Automata. Prerequisite: 
CSC 322. 3(3-0) F. 

CSC 421 Computer Systems for Management. Prerequisite: CSC 311. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC 431 Information Retrieval. Prerequisite: CSC 311. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC 432 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing. Prerequisite: CSC 302, ST 
371 and MA 231 or MA 405. 3(2-2) S. 

CSC 462 Computing for the Social Sciences. Prerequisite: ST 311 or equivalent. 
CSC majors may not receive credit for CSC 462. 3(3-0) S. 

CSC 495 Special Topics in Computer Science. Prerequisite: Permission of in- 
structor. 1-6 F,S. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CSC 501 Design of Systems Programs. Prerequisite: CSC 311, CSC 312 (CSC 301 
recommended). 3(3-0) F. Review of batch process systems programs, their com- 
ponents, operating characteristics, user services and their limitations. Implementa- 
tion techniques for parallel processing of input-output and interrupt handling. 
Overall structure of multiprogramming systems on multi -process or hardware con- 
figurations. Details on addressing techniques, core management, file system desigfn 
and management, system accounting, and other user-related services. Traffic control, 
interprocess communication, design of system modules, and interfaces. System up- 
dating, documentation and operation. 

CSC 502 Computational Linguistics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. 
Use of a symbol manipulation language (SNOBOL 4) in solving nonnumeric prob- 
lems. Study of generative grammars, including finite-state, context-free, context- 
sensitive, and transformational grammars. Syntactic analysis by computers: 
algorithms and existing analysis systems for English. Computational semantics. 
Information retrieval and question-answering systems. This course is open to 
computer science students and those in other fields. 

CSC 504 Application of Linguistic Techniques to Computer Problems. Pre- 
requisite: CSC 502. 3(3-0) S. Semiotics and programming languages. Comparison of 
semantic theories. Representation, classification and interpretation of scenes and 
other multi-dimensional illustrations. Design of a formal language for describing 
two-dimensional geometric figures, such as flowcharts, chemical structures and 
log:ic diagrams. Characterization of programming langfuages according to the theory 
of transformational grammar. 

CSC 511 Artificial Intelligence. Prerequisite: CSC 311. 3(3-0) F. Definition of 
heuristic verus algorithmic methods, rationale of heuristic approach, description of 



102 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

cogniitive processes. Objectives of work in artificial intelligence, simulation of 
cognitive behavior. Heuristic programming techniques. Survey of examples from 
representative application areas. The mind-brain problem and the nature of intel- 
ligence. Individual projects to illustrate basic concepts. 

CSC 512 Metaprograms. Prerequisite: CSC 311 (CSC 412 recommended). 3(3-0) F. 
This course is intended to provide a detailed understanding of the techniques used 
in the design and implementation of compilers. Introduction to formal gframmars 
and relations concerning a grammar. Detailed study of algorithms for lexical 
scanners, top-down recognizers, bottom-up recognizers for simple precedence gram- 
mars, operator precedence grammars, higher order precedence grammars, and 
bounded-context grammars. Runtime storage organization for a compiler including 
symbol tables, internal forms for source programs, semantic routines, error recovery 
and diagnostics, code generation and optimization, and interpreters. 

CSC 522 Formal Languages and Syntactic Analysis. Prerequisite: CSC 412 
(CSC 512 recommended). 3(3-0) S. Detailed study of formal languages and their 
relation to automata: languages and their representation, grammars, finite auto- 
mata and regular grammars, context-free grammars and pushdown automata, type 
grammars and Turning machines, the Halting Problem, context-sensitive gram- 
mars and linear bounded automata, and operations on languages. 

CSC 527 (MA 527) Numerical Analysis I. Prerequisite: CSC 101 or CSC 111, 
MA 301 or MA 312, MA 231 or MA 405. 3(3-0) F,S. Theory of interpolation, numeri- 
cal integration, iterative solution of non-linear equations, numerical integration 
of ordinary differential equations, matrix inversion and solution of simultaneous 
linear equations. 

CSC 528 (MA 528) Numerical Analysis IL Prerequisite: CSC 527 (MA 527). 
3(3-0) F,S. Least squares data approximation, expansions in terms of orthogonal 
functions, Gaussin quadrature, economization of series, minimax approximations, 
Pade's approximations, eigenvalues of matrices. 

CSC 532 Artificial Intelligence IL Prerequisite: CSC 511, course in mathematical 
logic. 3(3-0) S. A rigorous approach to artificial intelligence emphasizing pattern 
recognition, theorem proving, game playing, learning and heuristic programming. 
Students will be assigned computer projects illustrating theoretical concepts intro- 
duced in lecture. 

CSC 585 (OR 585) Graph Theory. Prerequisite: MA 231 or MA 405. 3(3-0) F. 
Basic concepts of graph theory. Trees and forests. Vector spaces associated with a 
graph. Representation of graphs by binary matrices and list structures. Travers- 
ability. Connectivity. Matching and assignment problems. Planar graphs. Color- 
ability. Directed graphs. Applications of graph theory with emphasis on organiz- 
ing problems in a form suitable for computer solution. 

CSC 595 Special Topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1-6 F,S. Topics of 
current interest in computer science not covered in existing courses. 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

CSC 603 Computational Semantics. Prerequisite: CSC 502, course in mathemat- 
ical logic. 3(3-0) F. Theoretical prerequisites and computational techniques for 
the mechanical interpretation of artificial and natural language sentences. 
Semantics of formal langfuages. Structural representations of meaning. Semantics 
of natural languages. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 103 

Crop Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. H. Harvey, Head 

Prcfessors: D. S. Chamblee, W. K. Collins, D. A. Emv^ry— Coordinator, Graduate 
Programs, D. U. Gerstel, W. C. Gregory, H. D. Gross, G. L. Jones, K. R. 
Keller, W. M. Lewis, T. J. Mann, P. A. Miller, R. P. Moore, L. L. 
PfflLLiPS, T. J. Sheets, D. H. Timothy, J. B. Weber, E. A. Wernsman, J. A. 
Weybrew, a. D. Worsham; Extension Professor: C. T. Blake; Professors 
USDA: C. A. Brim, J. F. Chaplin, W. A. Cope, J. A. Lee, D. E. Moreland, 
D. L. Thompson; Professor Emeritus: G. K. Middleton; Associate Professors: 
F. T. Corbin, W. T. Fike, W. B. Gilbert, R. C. Long, C. F. Murphy, R. P. 
Patterson, E. C. Sisler; Extension Associate Professor: J. G. Clapp Jr.; 
Associate Professors USDA: J. C. Burns, T. H. Busbice, G. R. Gwynn; Assis- 
tant Professor: J. W. Schrader, W. W. Weeks; Extension Assistant Professor: 
H. D. Coble; Assistant Professor USDA: C. F. Tester 

The Department of Crop Science offers instruction leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in the fields of plant breeding, crop 
production and physiology, forage crops ecology, weed control and plant 
chemistry. For students who wish general training, the Master of Agriculture 
degree is offered. 

Excellent facilities for graduate training are available. Each student is assigned 
office and laboratory space. Many special facilities such as preparation rooms for 
plant and soil samples, cold storage facilities for plant material, air-conditioned 
rooms for studying the physical properties of cotton fiber and tobacco leaf, and 
growth control chambers are provided for projects which require these facilities. 
Greenhouse space, growth control chambers and access to the plant environment 
laboratories (Phytotron) are provided for projects which require these facilities. 
Sixteen farms are owned and operated by the state for research investigations. 
Research farms are located throughout North Carolina, and include a variety of 
soil and climatic conditions needed for experiments in plant breeding, crop 
management, forage ecology and weed control. 

Strong supporting departments increase opportunities for broad and thorough 
training. Included among those departments in which graduate students in crop 
science work cooperatively or obtain instruction are: botany, chemistry, entomol- 
ogy, horticultural science, genetics, mathematics, plant pathology, soil science 
and statistics. 

In North Carolina, a state which derives 80 percent of its agricultural income 
from farm crops, the opportunities for the well-trained agronomist are great. 
Recipients of advanced degrees in crop science at North Carolina State University 
are found in positions of leadership in research and education throughout the 
nation and the world. 



104 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CS 402 (BO 402) Economic Botany. Prerequisite: BO 200. 3(2-3) S. 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production. Prerequisite: BO 421. 
2(2-0) F. 

CS 413 Plant Breeding. Prerequisite: GN 411. 2(2-0) S. 

CS 414 Weed Science. Prerequisite: CH 220 or equivalent. 3(2-2) F. 

CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 1(0-1) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

CS 511 Tobacco Technology. Prerequisite: BO 421 or equivalent. 2(2-0) S. A 
study of special problems concerned with the tobacco crop. The latest research prob- 
lems and findings dealing with this important cash crop will be discussed. Collins 

CS 513 Physiological Aspects of Crop Production. Prerequisite: BO 421. 
3(3-0) S. Discussion will emphasize pertinent physiological processes associated 
with crops and crop management such as plant growth, maturation, respiration 
and photoperiodism. Relationship of the environment to maximum crop yields 
will be discussed. (Offered in spring of 1974 and alternate years.) Fike 

CS 514 (HS 514) Principles and Methods in Weed Science. Prerequisite: CS 414 
or equivalent. 3(2-2) S. Studies on the losses caused by the ecology of weeds, 
biological control, basic concepts of weed management, herbicide-crop relationships 
and herbicide development. Introduction to greenhouse and bioassay techniques 
and field research techniques. Monaco, Schrader 

CS 541 (GN 541, HS 541) Plant Breeding Methods. Prerequisites: GN 506, 
ST 511. 3(3-0) F. An advanced study of methods of plant breeding as related to 
principles and concepts of inheritance. Henderson, Wemsman 

CS 542 (GN 542, HS 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures. Prerequisite: CS 
541 (GN 541, HS 541). 2(0-4) Sum. Laboratory and field study of the application of 
the various plant breeding techniques and methods used in the improvement of 
economic plants. (Offered in summer of 1974 and alternate years.) Harvey 

CS 545 (GN 545) Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants. Prerequisite: CS 
541 (GN 541, HS 541) or GN 540 (ZO 540). 2(2-0) S. Discussion topics include: man- 
kind as a potential cultivator; man's anatomy, physiology and alimentary needs; 
origins of cultivation; spread of agriculture in terms of various theories; inter- 
actions of crops and environments with reference to crop evolution; special 
attributes of cultigens; modem aspects of evolution (breeding). (Offered in spring 
of 1974 and alternate years.) Lee 

CS 591 Special Problems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credits Arranged. 
Special problems in various phases of crop science. Problems may be selected or 
will be assig:ned. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent and current 
research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY" 

CS 613 (GN 613, HS 613) Plant Breeding Theory. Prerequisites: CS 541 (GN 

* students are expected to consult with the instructor before regristration. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 105 

541, HS 541), GN 506, ST 512. 3(3-0) S. A study of theoretical bases for plant 
breeding procedures with special emphasis on the relationship between type and 
source of genetic variability, mode of reproduction and effectiveness of different 
selection procedures. The latest experimental approaches to plant breeding will 
be discussed as well as standard procedures. (Offered in spring of 1974 and 
alternate years.) Miller 

CS 614 (HS 614, SSC 614) Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. Prerequi- 
sites: BO 551 and CH 223 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. The chemical and 
physiological processes involved in the behavior of herbicides in plants and soils 
will be examined. Topics to be discussed include absorption, translocation, meta- 
bolism and mechanisms of action of herbicides on plants; reactions, movement 
and degradation of herbicides in the soil; and interactions among herbicides and 
other pesticides. (Offered in fall of 1973 and alternate years.) Monaco, Weber 

CS 690 Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1(1-0) F,S. A maximum of 
two credits is allowed toward the master's degree; however, additional credits 
toward the doctorate are allowed. Scientific articles, progress reports in research 
and special problems of interest to agronomists are reviewed and discussed. 

Graduate Staff 

CS 699 Research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credits Arranged. A maxi- 
mum of six credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but no restrictions 
toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff 



Design 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see architecture, 
page 70. ) 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

DN 411, 412 Advanced Visual Laboratory IH, IV. Prerequisites: DN 311, DN 312. 
2-4 F,S. 

DN 422 History of Design IIL Prerequisite: DN 122. 3(3-0) F,S. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

DN 505 Introduction to Design as Task. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in 
design or consent of school dean. 3(0-6) F,S,Sum. A studio course which approaches 
design primarily as task. A program of exercises will be undertaken to acquaint 
the student with the defining of tasks and their interpretation within a designer's 
power of action. Task as purpose or intention takes precedence over technique, 
which is considered as emergent from a defined task. 

DN 506 Introduction to Design as Technique. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
in design or consent of school dean. 3(0-6) F,S,Sum. A studio course which 
approaches design primarily as technique. A program of exercises will be under- 
taken to acquaint the student with the techniques available to him and their rela- 
tionship to existing and potential tasks. Technique as capability takes precedence 
over task, which is considered as emergent from a designated technique. 



106 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

DN 507 Introduction to Design as Practice. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in 
design or permission of school dean. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A seminar course intended 
to provide a comprehensive overview of current design concepts and activities. 
Presentations and discussions by School of Design faculty and design practitioners 
will explore the design fields in terms of issues, attitudes, methods, and operations. 

DN 511, 512 Advanced Visual Laboratory V, VL Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 2-4 F,S. Advanced experimental studies in visual phenomena related 
to design. 

DN 541 Seminar on Ideas in Design. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 2(2-0) F,S. 
An examination of aesthetics and the relationships of philosophic thought to design. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

DN 611, 612 Advanced Visual Laboratory VII, VIII. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 2(0-6) F,S. Advanced experimental studies in visual phenomena related 
to design. 



Ecology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: F. S. Barkalow, K. R. Barker, S. W. Buol, D. S. Chamblee, B. J. 
CoPELAND, D. E. Davis, J. W. Duffield, J. W. Hardin, D. W. Hayne, J. E. 
HoBBiE, H. L. Lucas, B. S. Martof, T. O. Perry, T. L. Quay, R. L. Rabb, 
R. van der Vaart; Associate Professors: L. F. Grand, A. G. Wollum; Assis- 
tant Professors: U. Blum, E. D. Seneca, G. G. Shaw 

Ecology is the science concerned with the interactions of organisms with each 
other and with their environment. It is an integrative science through which one 
gains an understanding of biological and physical interrelationships and predicts 
the consequences of altering one or several components of an ecosystem. 

Students in a number of basic and applied curricula may elect to minor in 
ecology at either the master's or doctor's level. The minor provides an opportunity 
for a coherent picture of the field of ecology, but does not usurp the normal pre- 
rogatives of graduate advisory committees in structuring graduate programs. 

The ecology minor is an interdepartmental program drawing faculty from the 
Departments of Botany, Crop Science, Entomology, Forestry, Plant Pathology, 
Soil Science, Statistics and Zoology. The program is administered by an Ecology 
Advisory Committee. Additional information about the program may be obtained 
by writing to one of the faculty members listed above or to Chairman, Ecology 
faculty, P. O. Box 5577, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 
27607. 

The following courses are recognized as ecological and have been grouped into 
certain related areas (for course descriptions see respective departmental listings). 

Population Ecology: ZO 517 Population Ecology; ENT 531 Insect Ecology; 
GN 550 (ZO 550) Experimental Evolution. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 107 

Limnology and Marine Science: ZO 519 Limnology; ZO 529 (MAS 529) 
Biological Oceanography; ZO 619 Advanced Limnology. 

Behavior: ZO 501 Ornithology; ZO 510 Adaptive Behavior of Animals; ZO 
610 Current Aspects of Animal Behavior. 

Microbial Ecology: MB 521 Microbial Ecology; PP 611 Advanced Plant 
Hematology; SSC 632 (MB 632) Ecology and Functions of Soil Micro- 
organisms; PP 625 (BO 625) Advanced Mycology. 

Terrestrial Ecology: BO 544 Plant Geography; SSC 551 Soil Morphology, 
Genesis and Classification; MY 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. 

Physiological Ecology: ZO 513 (PHY 513) Comparative Physiology; ZO 515 
Growth and Reproduction of Fishes; BO 561 Physiological Ecology. 

Mathematical Biology and Ecology: ZO 553 Principles of Wildlife Science; 
BMA 571, 572, (MA 571, 572; ST 571, 572) Biomathematics 1, IL 

The requirements for a minor in ecology are: 

Ph.D. Degree: Four ecological courses, including BO-ZO 560 (or its equivalent) 
and either BO-ZO 660 or BO-ZO 661. The other two courses may include 
BO-ZO 660 or BO-ZO 661 (if both are taken) and courses from those listed 
above. If two courses from this list are taken, they must be from different 
designated areas and generally should not be from the same department as 
the major. 

Master of Science Degree: Three ecological courses, including BO-ZO 560 (or its 
equivalent) and either BO-ZO 660 or BO-ZO 661. The third course 
course generally should not be in the same department as the major. 

Incoming students may apply equivalent courses toward these requirements 
at the discretion of their graduate committee. Students minoring in ecology, 
particularly at the Ph.D. level, are encouraged to take courses in mathematics and 
statistics, at least ST 511 and ST 512. 



Economics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. D. Toussaint, Head 

Professors: A. J. Coutu, D. M. Hoover, L. A. Ihnen, P. R. Johnson, R. A. 
King, G. A. Mathia, B. M. Olsen, E. C. Pasour Jr., J. A. Seagraves, 
R. L. Simmons, C. B. Turner, T. D. Wallace, W. H. Wallace, J. C. 
Williamson Jr.; Extension Professors: R. C. Brooks, G. L. Capel, 
T. E. Nichols Jr., C. R. Pugh, F. D. Sobering; USDA Professors: G. D. 
Irwin, J. G. Sutherland; Professors Emeriti: J. G. Maddox, E. W. 



108 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Swanson; Associate Professors: D. S. Ball, J. S. Chappell, W. D. Cooper, 
M. M. El-Kammash, E. W. Erickson, R. M. Fearn, B. L. Gardner, 
C. W. Harrell Jr., D. N. Hyman, E. W. Jones, F. A. Mangum Jr., 
R. J. Peeler Jr. — Coordinator of Graduate Programs, R. K. Perrin, 
R. A. ScHRiMPER, R. E. Sylla; Extension Associate Professors: R. D. 
Dahle, L. H. Hammond, f. E. Ikerd, R. C. Wells; Assistant Professors: J. B. 
Bullock, G. A. Carlson, A. R. Gallant, D. L. Holley, C. P. Jones, J. C. 
Poindexter Jr., C. R. Shumway; Adjunct Assistant Professor: I. P. 

\l J haw AN 

The Department of Economics offers programs of study leading to the Master 
of Economics, the Master of Arts in economics, the Master of Science in agri- 
cultural economics and the Ph.D. degree in economics. Emphasis is placed on 
economic theory and quantitative economic analysis and their application to 
economic problems. Special seminars and workshops are available to students 
as a means of pursuing topics of special interest. 

Master's programs require a minimum of 30 semester hours. A semester each 
of intermediate undergraduate micro and macro theory in addition to basic 
calculus are minimum prerequisites. Within the 30 hours, a nine-hour minor is 
required in some disciplines outside the department. No foreign language is 
required. The Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees require a thesis 
which receives up to six hours of credit toward the degree. The Master of 
Economics has no thesis requirement. 

The Ph.D. program has no specific hour requirements; however, at least six 
semesters of work beyond the bachelor's degree are required, of which at least 
two consecutive semesters must be in residence. Candidates take course work 
and written examinations in economic theory and a minor of their choice. In 
addition, each student chooses a field of study within the department (e.g., 
agricultural economics, economic development, econometrics, international 
trade, labor economics and human resources, or managerial economics). A mini- 
mum of two semesters of statistics and differential and integral calculus is required 
of all Ph.D. candidates. There is no foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. 
Specific programs are designed to meet the interest of the individual student 
and his professional objectives. 

A well-equipped departmental library, the D. H. Hill Library and hbrary 
facilities of two nearby major universities are readily available for graduate 
student use. Graduate students on financial support are provided office space. 
Computational facilities are available for students whose research involves 
extensive analysis of data and to students interested in learning to use computer 
facilities. The department has a well-trained clerical staff and has access to the 
IBM System/370 Model 165 operated by the Triangle Universities Computational 
Center. Access is also available to other medium speed terminals and an IBM Sys- 
tem/360 Model 40 located on the University campus. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EC 401 Economic Analysis for Nonmajors. Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 212. 
3(3-0) F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 109 

EC 410 Public Finance. Prerequisite: EC 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EC 413 Competition, Monopoly and Public Policy. Prerequisite: EC 301. 
3(3-0) F.S. 

EC 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance. Prerequisite: EC 303 or EC 310. 
3(2-2) F. 

EC 420 Corporation Finance. Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 212, and EC 260. 
3(3-0) F,S. 

EC 422 Investments and Portfolio Management. Prerequisites: EC 201 and 
EC 317 or ST 311. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EC 430 Agricultural Price Analysis. Prerequisite: EC 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EC 431 Labor Economics. Prerequisite: EC 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EC 435 Urban Economics. Prerequisite: EC 301. 3(3-0) S. 

EC 436 Environmental Economics. Prerequisite: EC 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EC 440 Economic Development. Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 212. 3(3-0) S. 

EC 442 Evolution of Economic Ideas. Prerequisite: EC 202 or EC 212. 3(3-0) S. 

EC 448 International Economics. Prerequisite: EC 301. 3(3-0) F. 

EC 451 Introduction to Econometrics. Prerequisites: EC 301, EC 302 and EC 
317 or ST 311. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EC 460 Specialized Financial Reporting Theory and Practice. Prerequisite: 
EC 361. 3(3-0) F. 

EC 464 Income Taxation. Prerequisite: EC 260. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EC 466 Examination of Financial Statements. Prerequisite: EC 361. 3(3-0) S. 

EC 468 Professional Accountancy Resume. Prerequisites: EC 362 and EC 460. 
3(3-0) S. 

EC 475 Comparative Economic Systems. Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 212. 
3(3-0) F. 

EC 482 (TX 482) Sales Management for Textiles. 3(3-0) S. (See textile 
technology, page 264.) 

EC 490, 491 Senior Seminars in Economics. Prerequisites: EC 301 and 302 

and 317 or ST 311 (plus two courses from list of restricted economics electives). 
3(3-0) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EC 501 Price Theory. Prerequisites: MA 112 and EC 301. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive 
analysis of the determination of prices and of market behavior, including demand, 
cost and production, pricing under competitive conditions and pricing under mono- 
poly and other imperfectly competitive conditions. Graduate Staff 



110 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EC 502 Income and Employment Theory. Prerequisites: MA 112 and EC 301 

and EC 302. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the methods and concepts of national income 
analysis with particular reference to the role of fiscal and monetary policy in 
maintaining full employment without inflation. Graduate Staff 

EC 515 Water Resources Economics. Prerequisite: EC 401 recommended. 
3(3-0) S. The application of economic principles in the allocation of water resources. 
Attention is given especially to the basic issues of how to effect maximum economic 
efficiency in the use of a resource that is no longer a free good, under the considera- 
tion of the goals of the public and private sectors of the enterprise economy. Both 
economic and political consequences of decision-making are studied. 

Graduate Staff 

EC 521 Markets and Trade. Prerequisite: EC 301 or EC 401. 3(3-0) F. This 
course emphasizes the space, form and time dimensions of market price and the 
location and product combination decisions of firms. Consideration is given 
to the ways in which non-price factors and public policy choices influence firm be- 
havior and the efficiency of marketing systems. Application of these models to agri- 
cultural, industrial and public service questions is emphasized, including the rela- 
tionships between resource availability and the spatial arrangement of economic 
activity. King 

EC 523 Planning Farm and Area Adjustments. Prerequisite: EC 301, EC 303 
or EC 401. 3(2-2) S. The application of economic principles in the solution of 
production problems on typical farms in the state; methods and techniques of 
economic analysis of the farm business; application of research findings to 
production decisions; development of area agricultural programs. Liner 

EC 525 Management Policy and Decision Making. Prerequisite: EC 301 or 
EC 401. 3(3-0) F,S. A review and consideration of modern management processes 
used in making top-level policies and decisions. An evaluation of economic, social 
and institutional pressures, and of the economic and noneconomic motivations, 
which impinge upon the individual and the organization. The problem of coordi- 
nating the objectives and the mechanics of management is examined. 

Graduate Staff 

EC 533 Agricultural Policy. Prerequisite: EC 301 or EC 401. 3(3-0) S. A review 
of the agricultural policy and action programs of the federal government as regards 
both input supply and commodities, analysis of objectives, principal means and 
observable results as regards resource use and income distribution within agri- 
culture, and between agriculture and the rest of the economy; appraisal of the 
effects alternative policy proposals would have on domestic and foreign con- 
sumption. Mangum 

EC 535 Social Science Concepts in Managerial Processes. Prerequisite: 
Six hours in economics. 3(3-0) S. Interrelationships between concepts from econo- 
mics and fi-om other social sciences in managerial processes of clarifying goals, 
discovering alternatives and choosing courses of action. Cases are used to provide 
opportunities to compare contributions of theoretical concepts from economics, 
political science, social psychology, sociology and management science to 
managerial processes. Theoretical concepts are drawn from readings in the various 
disciplines. Graduate Staff 

EC 550 Mathematical Models in Economics. Prerequisites: EC 301, EC 302, 
MA 212 and MA 405 recommended but not required. 3(3-0) F. An introductory 
study of economic models emphasizing their formal properties. The theory of 
individual economic units is presented as a special case in the theory of inductive 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 111 

behavior. Mathematical discussions of the theory of the consumer, the theory of 
the firm and welfare economics will show the relevance of such topics as constrained 
maxima and minima, set theory, partially and simply ordered systems, probability 
theory and game theory to economics. El-Kammash 

EC 551 Agricultural Production Economics. Prerequisites: MA 112 and EC 301 

or EC 401. 3(3-0) F. An economic analysis of agricultural production including: 
production functions, cost functions, programming and decision-making principles; 
and the applications of these principles to farm and regional resources allocation, 
and to the distribution of income to and within agriculture. Perrin 

EC 555 Linear Programming. Prerequisites: MA 231 or MA 405 and EC 301 

or EC 401. 3(3-0) F,S. Recent developments in the theory of production, allocation 
and organization. Optimal combination of integrated productive processes within 
the firm. Applications in the economics of industry and of agriculture. Harrell 

EC 561 (ST 561) Intermediate Econometrics. Prerequisites: EC 501 and ST 513. 
3(3-0) S. The formalization of economic hypotheses into testable relationships 
and the application of appropriate statistical techniques will be emphasized. 
Major attention will be given to procedures applicable for single equation stochastic 
models expressing microeconomic and macroeconomic relationships. Statistical 
considerations that are relevant in working with time series and cross sectional 
data in economic investigations will be covered. The use of simultaneous equation 
models and the available estimation techniques will be surveyed. Johnson 

EC 570 Analysis of American Economic History. Prerequisite: EC 371 (HI 
371) or graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. Stresses the application of economic analysis 
to the formulation and testing of hypotheses concerning economic growth and 
development in the historical context. Problems selected for analysis will be drawn 
primarily from American economic history. Sylla 

EC 574 (SOC 574) The Economics of Population. Prerequisite: EC 301 or 
EC 401. 3(3-0) S. A review of pre-Malthusian thought up to contemporary popula- 
tion theories. The student is introduced to data sources, statistical tools and 
methodology for economic analysis in demography. There follows an intensive 
treatment of microeconomic models of fertility. On the macroeconomic side, 
economic demographic models are examined. Implications of these economic 
models for public policy are developed. Underpopulation, overpopulation, optimum 
growth rate and incentive schemes are discussed. El-Kammash 

EC 585 (TX 585) Market Research in Textiles. 3(3-0) S. (See textile technology, 
page 264.) 

EC 590 Special Economics Topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Maximum 
6. An examination of current problems in economics organized on a lecture-dis- 
cussion basis. The content of the course will vary as changing conditions require 
the use of new approaches to deal with emergfing problems. Graduate Staff 

EC 598 Topical Problems in Economics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
1-6. An investigation of topics of particular interest to advanced students under 
the direction of faculty members on a tutorial basis. Credits and content will vary 
with the needs of the students. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EC 600 Advanced Price Theory. Prerequisites: EC 501, MA 212. 3(3-0) F. 
Alternative economic organizations and the role of prices; equilibrium and price 



112 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

determination in a market economy; theory of consumer behavior; derivation 
of individual demand curves and aggregation to market supply curves; demand 
for factors of production. Pasour 

EC 601 Prices, Value and Welfare. Prerequisite: EC 600. 3(3-0) S. The supply 
of factors of production; alternative nonmonetary theories of capital and interest; 
productivity; income distribution; determinants of firm size; the nature of market 
organization; welfare economics topics, including externalities, compensation, 
social welfare function and consumer surplus. Gardner 

EC 602 Advanced Income and Employment Theory. Prerequisite: EC 502. 
3(3-0) F. The course consists of an analysis of the forces determining the level 
of income and employment; a review of some of the theories of economic fluctua- 
tions; and a critical examination of a selected macroeconomic system. McElroy 

EC 603 History of Economic Thought. Prerequisites: EC 501 and EC 502 or 

equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A systematic analysis of the development and cumulation 
of economic thought, designed in part to provide a sharper focus and more adequate 
perspective for the understanding of contemporary economics. Turner 

EC 604 Monetary Economics. Prerequisite: EC 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 
Consideration of the money market and portfolio management, the cost of capital, 
effects of monetary phenomena on investment and accumulation of wealth with 
emphasis throughout on problems arising from uncertainty; general equilibrium 
theory of money, interest, prices and output. Lapp 

EC 606 Industrial Organization and Control, Prerequisite: EC 501. 3(3-0) F. 
Microeconomic theory is applied to the empirical analysis of public policies that 
affect the efficiency of resource allocation in the U. S. economy. Special attention 
is given to the interrelationships between industrial structure, conduct and 
performance. Erickson 

EC 610 Theory of Public Finance. Prerequisite: EC 501. 3(3-0) S. An application 
of microeconomic theory and welfare economics to the public sector. Areas covered 
include externalities and public policy, the theory of public goods, collective choice, 
program budgeting and cost-benefit analysis, the theory of taxation and its 
application to tax policy, public debt, and fiscal federalism. Hyman 

EC 625 Long Range Planning in Business and Industry. Prerequisite: EC 501. 
3(3-0) S. Theory and practice of long range planning in business and industry. 
Case discussions and intensive readings dealing with techniques for identifying 
opportunities and risks in the environment of the firm, determining corporate 
strengths and weaknesses, specifying long range strategy. Special attention is 
given to the roles of management and the internal processes of large organizations 
as the organizations respond to changes in external conditions. Dahle 

EC 630 Labor Economics and Manpower Problems. Prerequisites: EC 501, 
EC 502. 3(3-0) S. A course devoted to analysis of labor force problems and labor 
market behavior. Labor force measurement and behavior, the measurement and 
analysis of unemployment, the determinants or relative wages, wage structures, 
and hours of work and national manpower policy. Emphasis on empirical studies. 

Fearn 

EC 631 Human Capital. Prerequisites: EC 501, EC 502. 3(3-0) F. An examination 
of human resource development from an economic view. Emphasis is placed on 
recent research and theoretical developments related to the economics of education, 
on-the-job training, discrimination and migration. Ihnen 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 113 

EC 632 Economic Welfare and Public Policy. Prerequisite: EC 601. 3(3-0) S. 
Description of the conditions defining optimal resource allocation; application of 
the conditions for maximum welfare in appraisal of economic policies and programs 
affecting resource allocation and income distribution. Hoover 

EC 640 Analysis of Economic Development. Prerequisite: EC 502. 3(3-0) S. 
Theoretical and empirical studies of the processes of economic development are 
compared and analyzed. Contemporary developments in the theories of economic 
growth are related to the problems of underdeveloped countries. Policies and 
programs needed for effecting economic development are studied and evaluated 
for consistency. Olsen 

EC 641 Agricultural Production and Supply. Prerequisites: EC 501 and ST 513. 
3(3-0) S. An advanced study in the logic of, and empirical inquiry into, producer 
behavior and choice among combinations of factors and kinds and quantities of 
output; aggregative consequences of individuals' and firms' decisions in terms 
of product supply and factor demand; factor markets and income distribution; 
general interdependency among economic variables. Hoover 

EC 642 Consumption, Demand and Market Interdependency. Prerequisites: 
EC 501 and ST 513. 3(3-0) F. An analysis of the behavior of individual households 
and of consumers in the aggi-egate with respect to consumption of agricultural 
products; the impact of these decisions on demand for agricultural resources, 
the competition among agricultural regions and for markets; and the inter- 
dependence between agriculture and other sectors of the economy. King 

EC 645 Planning Programs for Economic Development. Prerequisites: EC 550, 
EC 640. 3(3-0) F,S. Consideration is given to the necessary quantitative measures 
for basing plans of national economic development. Models for program development 
and the techniques for their construction are studied. King 

EC 648 Theory of International Trade. Prerequisites: EC 501, EC 502. 3(3-0) S. 
A consideration of the specialized body of economic theory dealing with the 
international movement of goods, services, capital and payments. Also, a theoreti- 
cally oriented consideration of policy. Johnson 

EC 649 Monetary Aspects of International Trade. Prerequisite: EC 502. 
3(3-0) S. Study of the macroeconomic problems of an open economy including the 
balance of payments adjustment mechanism, alternative exchange rate systems, 
external effects of monetary and fiscal policy, optimum currency areas and 
international monetary reform. Grennes 

EC 650 Economic Decision Theory. Prerequisite: EC 501. 3(3-0) F,S. Study 
X)f general theories of choice. Structure of decision problems, the role of infor- 
mation; formulation of objectives. Current research problems. Carlson 

EC 651 (ST 651) Econometrics. Prerequisites: EC 600, ST 421, ST 502. 3(3-0) F. 
The role and uses of statistical inference in economic research; the problem of 
spanning the gap from an economic model to its statistical counterpart; measure- 
ment problems and their solutions arising from the statistical model and the nature 
of the data; limitations and interpretation of results of economic measurement 
from statistical techniques. Schrimper 

EC 652 (ST 652) Topics in Econometrics. Prerequisite: EC 651 (ST 651). 
3(3-0) S. Survey of current literature on estimation and inference in simultaneous 
stochastic equations systems. Techniques for combining cross section and time 
series data including covariance, error correlated and error component models. 



114 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Lag models and inference in dynamic systems. Production functions, productivity 
measurement and hypotheses about economic growth. Complete and incomplete 
prior information in regression analysis. Nonlinear estimation in economic 
models. Wallace 

EC 665 Economic Behavior of the Organization. Prerequisite: EC 501. 3(3-0) F,S. 
This seminar will apply methods and findings derived from the behavioral sciences 
to the economic behavior of the organization, particularly the business firm. 
Among the approaches which may be utilized are organization theory, information 
theory, reference group theory and decision theory. Graduate Staff 

EC 699 Research in Economics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credits 
Arranged. Individual research in economics under staff supervision and direction. 

Graduate Staff 



EDUCATION 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. J. Dolce, Dean 

Professor J. B. Kirkland, Dean Emeritus 

Associate Professor W. Maxwell Jr., Assistant Dean 

Professor: J. K. Coster; Adjunct Professor: Thelma L. Roundtree; Associate 
Professors: L. J. Betts Jr., S. D. Ivie, P. J. Rust, T. N. Walters; Adjunct 
Associate Professors: W. J. Brown, J. R. Clary, C. H. Rogers, H. G. Royall 
Jr.; Assistant Professors: W. L. Cox Jr., C. W. Harper Jr., D. R. Kniefel, 
Barbara M. Parramore; Instructor: Kathleen A. McCutchen; Research 
Associates: R. L. Morgan, Mollie W. Shook 

The following master's degiee progriuns are offered by the School of Education: 

Adult and Community College Education 

Agricultural Education 

Curriculum and Instruction 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

Guidance and Personnel Sei"vices 

Industrial Arts Education 

Mathematics Education 

Occupational Education 

Psychology 

Science Education 

Special Education 

Vocational Industriiil Education 

Students may enroll in programs leading to the Master of Science degree or 
the Master of Education degree. The Master of Science degree is a research 
degree and is preparation for further graduate study. The Master of Education 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 115 

degree is a professional degree which allows for a wider latitude in the choice of 
course work than is allowed by the Miister of Science degiee programs. 
The following doctoral programs are offered by the School of Education: 

Adult and Community College Education Ed.D. 

Curriculum and Instruction Ed.D. 

Educational Administration and Supervision Ed.D. 

Guidance and Personnel Sei-vices Ed.D. 

Industrial Arts Education Ed.D. 

Mathematics Education Ph.D. 

Occupational Education Ed.D. 

Psychology Ph. D. 

Science Education Ph.D. 

Graduate programs are planned in terms of the educational objectives, experi- 
ence, and preparation of students. 

The School of Education is housed in Poe Hall, a modem building with up-to- 
date research facilities such as a variety of computer terminals. 

Prior to consideration of applications for admission, the following must have 
been received: a completed application forni, an oflRcial copy of cuirent Graduate 
Record Examination scores, official transcripts for all undergraduate and prior 
graduate courses taken and at least three completed recommendation forms. In 
most programs, an intei^view is required. In order to maintain personalized, quality 
graduate programs, each program can enroll only a limited number of students 
irrespective of the qualifications of the applicants. 

A limited number of teaching and research assistantships are available for 
qualified graduate students. 



Adult and Community College Education 

(Adult and Community College Education is a component of both the School 
of Education and the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. For a listing of 
graduate faculty and departmentiil information, see Adult and Community College 
Education, page 65. ) 



Agricultural Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor Emeritus: C. C. Scabborough; Associate Professors: T. R. Miller — Grad- 
uate Administrator, C. D. Bryant 

The Department of Agricultural Education offers programs of study leading to 
the Master of Science and the Master of Education degrees. Graduate programs 



116 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



are designed to meet the needs of individual students for further study and research 
as well -as to prepare them for educational leadership roles in teaching, admini- 
stration, supervision and research. 

For complete course descriptions, see page 122. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 593 Special Problems in Agricultural Education. Credits Arranged. F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 693 Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education. Credits Arranged. F,S, 
Sum. 

ED 694 Seminar in Agricultural Education. Maximum 2, 1(1-0) F,S,Sum. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

The master's degree program in Curriculum and Instruction is designed for 
those individuals who wish to develop instructional skills in innovative techniques 
in program areas ranging from pre-school through post-secondary education and 
who wish to qualify as instructional specialists and consultants in school systems. 
The program is a two-year program for those students who have not had prior 
experience in teaching, and who do not have a degree in professional education. 
The program for students who have had prior experience includes a minimum of 
36 semester hours of study with emphasis upon the student's teaching field as well 
as upon professional education. Students who complete this program may qualify 
for a Graduate Teaching Certificate. 

The doctoral program requires prior university preparation in professional edu- 
cation as well as actual teaching experience. The doctoral program is aimed at 
preparing as curriculum specialists, university instructors in professional education 
and instructional evaluation specialists. This Ed.D. program includes a large 
amount of work in developing competencies in research. 

Progrixms are individually developed from the courses described beginning on 
page 122. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 117 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

The master's degree program in Educational Administration and Supervision is 
designed to prepare individuals for entry level administrative and supervisory 
positions in the schools. The program is also designed to enable graduates to meet 
certification requirements for such positions. 

The doctoral degree (Ed.D) progriim is designed for those individuals who have 
had prior professional education or experience in school administration and super- 
vision. There is a multidisciplinary emphiisis which includes courses in economics, 
politics, psychology, and sociology, as well as in professional education. The pro- 
griim includes a large component of clinical practice. Students may select a special 
emphixsis in educational pUinning and evaluation. 

For education courses see course listing beginning on page 122. 



Guidance and Personnel Services 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. E. Hopke, Head 

Professor: C. G. Morehead; Associate Professor: B. C. Talley; Assistant Profes- 
sors: L. K. Jones, Julie Gegner McVay 

The department offers work leading to the Master of Science, Master of Edu- 
cation and Doctor of Education degrees with a major in the field of guidance and 
personnel services (or counselor education). Each of these degrees is designed to 
prepare individuiils for guidance and personnel positions at various levels in ele- 
mentary and secondary schools, junior and community colleges, trade and technical 
schools and institutes, institutions of higher education, agencies (such as employ- 
ment and rehabilitation offices), as well as guidiince and personnel work in busi- 
ness, industry and government. The student may specialize in one of severiil areas 
depending upon individual career goals. 

It is desirable for an applicant to have had undergraduate or graduate course 
work in economics, education, psychology, sociology or social work. Students 
accepted into the department are those who anticipate devoting full- or part-time 
to guidance and personnel work. 

Admission requirements for the department are: a minimum of a B average in 
the undergraduate major; satisfactory scores on the aptitude section of the Gradu- 
ate Record Examination; three satisfactory letters of recommendation in regard 
to previous educational and employment experiences, personal charteristics and 
emotiouid maturity. 

For descriptions of the guidance and personnel courses listed below, see page 
122. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 520 Personnel and Guidance Services, 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services. Credits Arranged. F,S. 



118 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 524 Occupational Information. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

ED 530 Group Guidance. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 533 Organization and Administration of Guidance Services. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

ED 534 Guidance in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education, 3(3-0) F,Sum. 

ED 540 Individual and Group Appraisal I. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 590 Individual Problems in Guidance. Maximum 6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 631 Vocational Development Theory. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 633 Techniques of Counseling. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work. Maximum 3 F,S. 

ED 640 Individual and Group Appraisal II. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 641 Laboratory and Practicum Experiences in Counseling. 2-6 F,S,Sum. 

ED 666 Supervision of Counseling. 3(1-8) F,S,Sum. 

Industrial and Technical Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. M. Hanson, Head 

Professor: J. T. Nerden; Assistant Professors: T. C. Shore, F. S. Smith; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: W. A. McIntosh 

The Department of Industrial and Technical Education offers graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Master of Education. The rapid 
development of industriiil and technical education in North Carolina and through- 
out the nation provides opportunities for teachers, supei-visors iind administrators 
who have earned advanced degrees. 

The facilities at the University afford iin excellent program of supporting courses 
at the graduate level in the related fields of computer science, economics, engi- 
neering, guidiince and personnel sei-vices, mathematics, psychology, science, 
sociology and statistics. The prerequisite for graduate work in the Department of 
Industrial and Technical Education is a proficiency in the undergraduate courses 
required for the bachelor's degree in industrial or technical education, or a sub- 
stantial equivalent. 

A limited number of teaching and research assistantships and fellowships are 
available for qualified graduate students. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 119 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 516 Community Occupational Surveys. 2(2-0) S. 

ED 517 Implications for Data Processing in Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 525 Trade Analysis and Course Construction. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education. Maximum 6. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 608 Supervision of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Technical Educational Programs. 3(3-0) F,S- 

ED 610 Administration of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education. 3(3-0) S. 

ED 611 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting Vocational Education. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 

ED 612 Finance, Accounting and Management of Vocational Education Programs. 

3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 691 Seminar in Industrial Education. 1(1-0) F,S. 



Industrial Arts Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. W. Oi.sofi— Coordinator of Graduate Studies for Industrial Arts; Asso- 
ciate Professor: T. B. Young 

The Industrial Arts section offers graduate work leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science, Master of Education and Doctor of Education. Graduate programs are 
designed for teachers who wish to develop their instructional competencies and 
for those who wish to be supei-visors and administrators of Industrial Arts pro- 
grams. 

FOR GRADUATE AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

lA 510 Design for Industrial Arts Teachers. Prerequisites: Six hours of dravi^ing, 
lA 205 or equivalent. 3(2-2) Sum. A study of new developments in the field of design 
with emphasis on the relationship of material and form in the selection and design- 
ing of industrial arts projects. Graduate Staff 



120 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

lA 560 (ED 560) New Developments in Industrial Arts Education. Prerequisites: 
Twelve hours of education and teaching experience. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course is 
a study of the new developments in industrial arts education. It is designed to 
assist teachers and administrators in developing new concepts and new content 
based on the changes in technology. Olson, Graduate Staff 

lA 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial .Arts. Prerequisites: Senior standing, 
consent of instructor. Maximum 6. Courses based on individual problems and de- 
signed to give advanced majors in industrial arts education the opportunity to 
broaden or intensify their knowledge and abilities through investigation and re- 
search in the various fields of industrial arts, such as metals, plastics, ceramics or 
electricity-electronics. Graduate Staff 

lA 592 Special Problems in Industrial .Arts. Prerequisite: One term of student 
teaching or equivalent. Maximum 6. The purpose of this course is to broaden the 
subject matter experience in the areas of industrial arts. Problems involving cur- 
riculum, investigation or research in one or more industrial arts areas will be 
required. Graduate Staff 

lA 595 (ED 595) Industrial .Arts Workshop. Prerequisite: One or more years of 
teaching experience. 3(3-0) Sum. A course for experienced teachers, administrators 
and supervisors of industrial arts. The primary purpose will be to develop sound 
principles and practices for initiating, conducting and evaluating programs in this 
field. Enrollees will pool their knowledge and practical experiences and will do 
intensive research work on individual and group problems. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

lA 645 Technology and Industrial Arts. Prerequisites: lA 560, ED 630. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Technology: its nature, origins, advance. Impact of technological advance on man 
and culture. Technology as the material culture. Changing concepts of work, skill, 
occupations, discretionary time. Technology and its relation to industrial arts edu- 
cation. Olson 

lA 660 (ED 660) Industrial Arts Curriculum. Prerequisite: lA 645. 3(3-0) F.S, 
Sum. Industrial arts curriculum origins, analysis, organization, evaluation, revision. 
Subject matter derivation and classification applicable to all levels of instruction. 
Relationships among curriculum, philosophy and methodology. Olson 



Mathematics and Science Education 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Profesiior H. E. Speece, Head 

Professor: N. D. Anderson; Associate Professors: ]. R. Kolb, H. A, Shannon; 
Assistant Professors: W. M. Waters Jr., L. W. Watson 

The Departnnent of Mathematics and Science Education ofiFers graduate work 
leading to the degrees of Master of Science, Master of Education, and Doctor of 
Philosophy with majors in mathematics education or science education. Each 
student's program is individually planned by a graduate committee and will reflect 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 121 

the individual's undergraduate and graduate preparation, teaching experience and 
future professional plans. Areas of specialization include mathematics, biological 
science, earth science, chemistry, and physics for a Master's degree. In the master's 
programs, a minimum of 36 semester hours is required, of which 60 percent must 
be in the area of subject matter specialization and 20 per cent in professional 
education. Candidates for the Master of Education degree are required to submit 
a scholarly research paper or otherwise demonstrate competency in educational 
research. Candidates for the Master of Science degree must conduct an investiga- 
tion culminating in a thesis. Doctoral programs are individually planned by the 
student's graduate committee; and as in the Master's programs, students take 
courses in both professional education and the area of their teaching specialty. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure and Processes for the 
Teaching of M athematics in the Elementary School. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 512 Active Learning Approaches to Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary 
School. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Science in Higher Education. 3(3-0) F. 

ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Science and Mathematics. 

3(3-0) F,S. 

ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers of Mathematics and Science. 

3(3-0) S. 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education. Maximum 2 F,S. 
ED 695 Seminar in Science Education. Maximum 2 F,S. 



Occupational Education 

The master's degree program in Occupational Education has two options. One 
option is aimed at developing competencies for entry level administrative and 
supervisory positions in occupational education. The second option is aimed at 
developing specialized competencies in teaching courses such as introduction to 
vocations and middle grades exploratory occupational classes. 

The doctoral program has as a primary purpose the development of leadership 
in research, administration and supervision, teacher education, and curriculum 
and instruction in occupational education. The doctoral program is a comprehensive 



122 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

one which seeks to develop a broad perspective of the entire field of occupational 
education. Students should have a prior specialization in one vocational education 
area. 

Psychology 

(See page 234.) 

Special Education 

The education of teachers of students who require specialized instructional skills 
and techniques, e.g., mentally retarded and sensory impaired students such as 
visually handicapped, is the primary focus of the master's degree program in 
Special Education. The program of studies in Special Education places emphasis 
upon the fields of psychology and education. 

Education Courses 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ED 500 The Community College System. Prerequisite: Graduate or advanced 
undergraduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Comprehensive community colleges and 
technical institutes and the state systems of which they are a part: underlying con- 
cepts, educational needs they are designed to serve, role in meeting these needs, 
historical development, issues in the establishment and operation of state systems 
and individual institutions, unresolved issues and emerging trends. Segner 

ED 501 (SOC 501) Leadership. Prerequisite: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. 
A study of leadership in various fields of American life; analysis of the various 
factors associated with leadership; techniques of leadership. Particular attention 
is given to recreational, scientific and executive leadership procedures. 

ED 502 (PS 502) Public Administration. Prerequisite: PS 200 or consent of 
instructor. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A study of the factors which contribute to goal displace- 
ment in public agencies and the institutions, concepts and techniques which may be 
used in such agencies to reduce the effects of these factors. 

ED 503 The Programming Process in Adult and Community College Education. 

Prerequisites: ED 501, consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. The principles and 
processes involved in programming, including basic theories and concepts support- 
ing the programming process. Attention will be given to the general framework in 
which programming is done, the organization needed and the program roles of both 
professional and lay leaders. Boone 

ED 504 Principles and Practices of Introduction to Vocations. Prerequisites: 
Twelve hours in education. 3(3-0) F,S. This course is designed for teachers in the 
public schools of North Carolina who teach Introduction to Vocations. The course 
emphasizes the place of the Introduction to Vocations Program in the overall school 
curriculum, special methods of instruction, use of teaching aids and use of student 
evaluation instruments. An overview is also presented in the areas of community 
organization, job markets, group procedures, occupational and educational informa- 
tion, and the changing occupational structure in our society. Graduate Staff 

ED 505 Public Area Schools. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,Sum. 
Junior and community colleges, technical institutes, vocational schools and branches 
of universities: their development, status and prospects policy and policy making, 
clientele, purposes, evaluation programs, personnel, organization administration, 
financing, facilities, research and development functions. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 123 

ED 506 Education of Exceptional Children. Prerequisites: Six hours education or 
psychology. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Discussion of principles and techniques of teaching the 
exceptional child with major interest on the mentally handicapped and slow learner. 
Practice will be given in curriculum instruction for groups of children, and indi- 
vidual techniques for dealing with retarded children in the average classroom. 
Opportunity for individual work with an exceptional child will be provided. 

ED 507 Analysis of Reading Abilities. Prerequisites: Six hours of education or 
psychology. 3(3-0) F,Sum. A study of tests and techniques in determining specific 
abilities; a study of reading retardation and factors underlying reading difficulties. 

Rust 

ED 508 Improvement of Reading Abilities. Prerequisites: Six hours education or 
psychology. 3(3-0) S.Sum. A study of methods used in developing specific reading 
skills or in overcoming certain reading difficulties; a study of methods used in 
developing pupil vocabularies and word analysis skills; a study of how to control 
vocabulary burden of reading material. 

ED 509 Methods and Materials — Teaching Retarded Children. Prerequisite: ED 
506. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Emphasis on understanding and correlating developmental 
levels of mentally retarded children and appropriate educational methods and 
materials. Use of individual child's diagnostic data; consideration ot long and short 
range educational goals; curriculum planning in terms of realistic usefulness; 
scheduling; teacher guidance of children toward social and emotional maturity. 

McCutchen 

ED 510 Adult Education: History, Philosophy, Contemporary Nature. Prereq- 
uisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A study of the historical and philosoph- 
ical foundations of adult education from ancient times to the present, giving at- 
tention to key figures, issues, institutions, movements and programs, including 
consideration of the relationship between adult education's historical development 
and prevailing intellectual, social, economic and political conditions. Consideration 
of adult education's contemporary nature, present-day schools of thought on its 
objectives and trends. Trent 

ED 511 Implications of Mathematical Content, Structure, and Processes for the 
Teaching of Mathematics in the Elementary School. Prerequisites: Bachelor's 
degree in elementary education, or permission of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A 
course designed for teachers and supervisors of mathematics in the elementary 
school. Special emphasis is given to the implications of mathematical content, 
structure, and processes in teaching arithmetic and geometry in the elementary 
school. Attention is given to the use of logic and fundamental rules of inference, 
deductive and inductive reasoning, the field properties in the sets of integers and 
rational numbers, elementary number theory, metric and non-metric geometry. 

Watson 

ED 512 Active Learning Approaches to Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary 
School. Prerequisites: Bachelor's degree in elementary education or permission of 
the instructor. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A course that will stress active learning approaches 
to the teaching of mathematics in the elementary school. Special emphasis will be 
given to the laboratory approach to teaching mathematics and the use of manipula- 
tive materials and activities of the Nuffield Project, the Madison Project, Dienes, 
Cuisenaire, and Gattegno. Watson 

ED 513 (SOC 513) Community Organization. Prerequisite: SOC 202 or equiva- 
lent. 3(3-0) F. Community organization is viewed as a process of bringing about 
desirable changes in community life. Community needs and resources available to 
meet these needs are studied. Democratic processes in community action and 



124 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

principles of community organization are stressed, along with techniques and 
procedures. The roles of leaders, both lay and professional, in community develop- 
ment are analyzed. 

ED 516 Community Occupational Surveys. Prerequisites: Six hours education, 
consent of instructor. 2(2-0) S. Methods in organizing and conducting local surveys 
and evaluation of findings in planning a program of vocational education. 

Shore, Hanson 

ED 517 Implications for Data Processing in Education. Prerequisites: CSC 111; 
ED 529 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study of current attempts 
to apply new technologies to education. Attention will be given to research findings 
related to Computer Assisted Instruction, gamed instructional simulation, ap- 
proaches to guidance and prescription learning as well as administrative problems 
pertaining to student scheduling, pupil transportation and data reporting systems. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 518 Principles of School Law. Prerequisites: Six hours graduate credit. 3(3-0) 
F,S. This course will be an intensive study of the legal right, duties, privileges and 
responsibilities entailed in the educational enterprise. It will cover the essentials of 
school law in such a way that the student will be able to obtain both a general 
understanding of the processes of law as they affect American education and also 
important specific legal aspects which affect vocational education. Included are 
the secondary, post-secondary and adult vocational education laws and their impli- 
cations. Graduate Staff 

ED 519 Early Childhood Education. Prerequisite: PSY 475 or PSY 576. 3(1-4) 
S,Svmi. This course is concerned with the planning, selection and utilization of 
himian resources, activities, materials and facilities relating to the education of 
young children. Emphasis on student observation, participation and evaluation of 
educational experiences appropriate for the developmental level of individual chil- 
dren including flexible grouping, curricula planning and instructional techniques 
for an optimum learning environment. A synthesis of the student's knowledge of 
human development, learning theory and research findings as related to classroom 
application. McCutchen 

ED 520 Personnel and Guidance Services. Prerequisite: Six hours in education or 
psychology. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. An introduction to the philosophies, theories, principles 
and practices of personnel and guidance services; the relationship of personnel 
services with the purpose and objectives of the school and the curriculum. 

ED 521 Internship in Guidance and Personnel Services. Prerequisite: Eighteen 
hours in department and permission of instructor. Credits Arranged F,S. A continu- 
ous full-time internship of at least one-half semester. Framework of school and com- 
munity. Work with students, teachers, administrators, guidance and pupil personnel 
workers, parents, and resource personnel in the community. Supervision of intern 
by guidance personnel in a school as well as by course instructors. 

ED 522 Career Exploration. Prerequisites: ED 344 and graduate status or per- 
mission of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S,Svmi. This course is designed for teachers in the 
public schools of North Carolina who teach in Career Exploration programs. The 
course exphasizes the philosophy of Career Exploration, theories supporting Career 
Exploration, the place of exploration programs in the overall school curriculvun, 
correlation of Occupational Information in academic subjects, sources of Oc- 
cupational Information and its use, and approaches to teaching in a Career Explora- 
tion program. 



J 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 125 

ED 523 Orientation and Mobility of the Visually Impaired. 3(3-0) Sum. The 
sensory processes and sensory cues on which independent mobility depends for the 
visually impaired person will be discussed. Various techniques and modes of travel 
will be considered. Particular emphasis will be ^ven to instruction and background 
which will enable persons not teaching orientation mobility as a skill to reinforce 
the learning that takes place in other situations. 

ED 524 Occupational Information. Prerequisites: Six hours education or psy- 
chology, ED 520 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course is intended to give 
teachers, counselors, placement workers and personnel workers in business and 
industry an understanding of how to collect, classify, evaluate and use occupational 
and educational information. This will include a study of the world of work, sources 
of occupational information, establishing an educational-occupational information 
library, using educational, occupational and social information and sociological and 
psychological factors, influencing career planning. 

ED 525 Trade Analysis and Course Construction, Prerequisites: ED 344, PSY 
304. 3(3-0) F. Principles and practices in analyzing occupations for the purpose of 
determining teaching content. Practice in the principles underlying industrial 
course organization based on occupational analysis covering instruction skills and 
technology and including course outlines, job sequences, the development of indus- 
trial materials and instructional schedules. 

ED 526 Teaching in College. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Designed primarily for graduate 
students in the departments outside the School of Education, this course focuses on 
the development of competencies to perform the day-to-day tasks of a college teacher 
as well as consideration of more long-range tasks such as course development and 
the university responsibilities of a professor. In addition to attending lectures and 
other types of presentations, students will make video tapes of their teaching, 
develop tests, design an introductory course in teaching field, and engage in other 
similar types of activities. Anderson 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. 
3(3-0) F. An historical and philosophical investigation into the social and economic 
aspects of occupational education; an overview of the broad field of vocational 
education for youth and adults with emphasis upon the trends and problems con- 
nected with the conduct of occupational education under federal and state guidance; 
an overview study of federal and state legislation pertaining to vocational edu- 
cation. 

ED 528 Cooperative Occupational Education. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 
3(3-0) F,S. This course is designed to guide and assist in the growth patterns of 
individuals who are preparing to be directors, administrators or supervisors of 
vocational education programs at the local, state and/or national levels, with special 
emphasis upon the organization and operation of cooperative occupational edu- 
cation on secondary, post-secondary and adult levels. It will refer to the accepted 
programs. The course will cover the entire field of cooperative occupational edu- 
cation on secondary, post-secondary and adult levels. It will refer to the accepted 
essentials of cooperative education in order that the application of the philosophy 
to the details of planning, organization, establishment, and operation of cooperative 
occupational programs will be practical and meaningful. Included will be student 
visitations to existing quality programs in cooperative occupational education, for 
the purpose of studying on-site conditions related to this specialized area of study. 

Smith 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development. Prerequisite: ED 525. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Selection and organization of curricula used in vocational-industrial and technical 
education; development of curricula and instructional materials. 



126 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ED 530 Group Guidance. Prerequisites: Six hours education or psychology, ED 
520 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course is designed to help teachers, coun- 
selors, administrators and others who work with groups, or who are responsible 
for group guidance activities, to understand the theory and principles of effective 
group work, to develop skill in using specific guidance techniques, and to plan and 
organize group activities in the secondary school and other institutions. 

ED 531 (PSY 531) Mental Deficiency. Prerequisites: Nine hours psychology and 
special education. 3(3-0) S.Sum. This will be a course in description, causation, 
psychological factors and sociological aspects of mental retardation. Educational 
methods for the mentally retarded will be examined. The course is designed pri- 
marily for school psychologists and special-class teachers of retarded children, both 
educable and trainable. McCutchen 

ED 533 Organization and Administration of Guidance Services. Prerequisites: 
Graduate standing, ED 520 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S,Sum. This course is designed for 
school guidance counselors, prospective counselors, personnel and guidance di- 
rectors, and school administrators. The philosophy and scope of guidance and 
personnel services; the functions and responsibilities of personnel involved; basic 
principles and current practices in planning, developing, operating and supervising 
guidance and personnel services will be considered. 

ED 534 Guidance in the Elementary School. Prerequisite: Nine hours psychology 
or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Designed for acquainting elementary school 
teachers, counselors and administrators with theory, practice and organization of 
elementary school guidance. 

ED 535 Student Personnel Work in Higher Education. Prerequisite: Nine hours 
psychology or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F.Sum. Examines practices in various 
areas of student personnel work. Studies both structure and function of personnel 
programs in higher education. 

ED 536 Structure and Function of the Eye and Use of Low Vision. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor. 3(5-0) Sum. This is a special institute in which participants 
will spend a minimum of 45 hours in class and class related activities. Medical and 
educational consultants will discuss the structure and function of the eye, eye 
anomalies likely to affect children with low vision, and methods of teaching children 
to use minimal vision effectively; for teachers and administrators either presently 
employed in educational programs for low vision persons or planning to participate 
in such programs next year. Graduate Staff 

ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education. Pre- 
requisite: ED 510. 3(3-0) S,Sum. An examination of the background, history, philo- 
sophy and contemporary nature of the extension and public service function of insti- 
tutions of higher education in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the adult 
education role of public and private universities and colleges. Specific focus is on: 
General Extension, Industrial Extension, Engineering Extension, Cooperative 
Extension and Continuing Education. Trent 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education. 

Prerequisite: ED 559, graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,Sum. This course examines forms 
of instruction appropriate for the teaching of adults. Special emphasis will be placed 
upon methods which maximally involve the adult learner. The study of concepts, 
theories, and principles relevant to the selection, utilization, and evaluation of 
instructional strategies will focus on the integration of theory into practice. Through 
participation in classroom exercises, the student will develop proficiency in using 
teaching techniques which are applicable in adult and community college education. 

Glass 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 127 

ED 540 Individual and Group Appraisal I. Prerequisites: ED 520, PSY 535, or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Use of group tests of intelligence, interest and achievement in 
educational and career planning and in placement. Theories of intelligence and 
interest will be followed by laboratory in evaluating, administering and interpreting 
widely used group test of intelligence, interest and achievement. Emphasis is on the 
use of group test in group guidance. 

ED 542 Contemporary Approaches in the Teaching of Social Studies. Pre- 
requisites: Advanced undergraduate or graduate; must have completed student 
teaching. 3(3-0) S,Sum. An analysis of the principles, strategies and application of 
new teaching approaches. Team -teaching, programmed instruction, inductive and 
reflective oriented teaching, role-playing, simulation and gaming, independent study 
and block-time organization will be explored. Harper, Parramore 

ED 550 Principles of Educational Administration. Prerequisites: Graduate stand- 
ing, consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course is designed as an introductory 
course in educational administration. Emphasizing basic principles of adminis- 
tration, the course will draw upon administrative theory, business, and public ad- 
ministration models as well as theoretical constructs from various disciplines. 

Graduate Staff 

ED 552 Industrial Arts in the Elementary School. Prerequisites: Twelve hours 
education, consent of instructor. 3(3-0) Svun. This course is organized to help ele- 
mentary teachers and principals understand how tools, materials and industrial 
processes may be used to vitalize and supplement the elementary school child's 
experiences. Practical children's projects along with the building of classroom equip- 
ment. Graduate Staff 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite: ED 411 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Consideration of the need for planning programs in edu- 
cation; objectives and evaluation of community programs; use of advisory group; 
organization and use of facilities. 

ED 555 Comparative Crafts and Industries. Prerequisites: Advanced imdergrad- 
uate or graduate standing, consent of instructor. 6 Sum. A travel seminar as a cul- 
tural appreciations course involving study of indigenous crafts and industries, their 
materials, processes, products and design in foreign countries. 

ED 559 Learning Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community College 
Education. Prerequisite: Six hours in education. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Principles involved 
in adult education programs including theories and concepts undergfirding and 
requisite to these programs. Emphasis will be given to the interrelationship of the 
nature of adult learning, the nature of the subject matter and the setting in which 
learning occurs. The applicability of relevant principles and pertinent research 
findings to adult learning will be thoroughly treated. Parsons 

ED 560 (lA 560) New Developments in Industrial Arts Education. 3(3-0) F,S, 
Sum. (See industrial arts education, page 120.) 

ED 563 Effective Teaching. Prerequisites: Twelve hours education including 
student teaching. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. Analysis of the teaching-learning process; as- 
sumptions that underlie course approaches; identifying problems of importance; 
problem solution for effective learning; evaluation of teaching and learning; making 
specific plans for effective teaching. Graduate Staff 

ED 565 Agricultural Occupations. Prerequisite: ED 411. 3(3-0) F,S. The theory 
of education and work is related to the expanding field of agricultural occupations. 
Career development in agricultural occupations is associated with curriculum de- 



128 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

velopment needs. Occupational experience in agriculture is seen in relation to the 
curriculum and the placement in agricultural occupations. 

ED 566 Occupational Experience in Agriculture. Prerequisite: ED 411. 3(3-0) F,S. 
A major and critical element in all programs of vocational education is the provision 
for appropriate student learning experiences in a real and simulated employment 
environment. Due to recent developments in education and agriculture, new and 
expanded concepts of occupational experience have been devised. Current research 
substantiates the need and desire of teachers of agriculture for assistance in imple- 
menting the new concepts. The course is designed not only to provide this aid but 
to develop a depth of understanding of the theoretical foundations underlying the 
new developments in occupational experiences to stimulate individual growth and 
creativity in implementing further developments. 

ED 568 Adult Education in Agriculture. Prerequisite: ED 411 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F,S. Designed to meet the needs of leaders in adult education. Opportunity to 
study some of the basic problems and values in working with adult groups. Attention 
will be given to the problem of fitting the educational program for adults into the 
public school program and other educational programs as well as to the methods of 
teaching adults. 

ED 590 Individual Problems in Guidance. Prerequisite: Six hours graduate work 
in department or equivalent and permission of instructor. Maximimi 6 F,S. Intended 
for individual or group studies of one or more of the major problems in guidance and 
personnel work. Problems will be selected to meet the interests of individuals. The 
workshop procedure will be used whereby special projects, reports, and research will 
be developed by individuals and by groups. 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education. Prerequisites: Six hours grad- 
uate credit, permission of department head. Maximum 6. Directed study to provide 
individualized study and analysis in specialized areas of trade, industrial or techni- 
cal subjects. 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathematics Teaching. Prerequisite: ED 471 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. An investigation of current problems in mathematics 
teaching, with emphasis on the areas of curriculum, methodology, facilities, super- 
vision and research. Specific problems will be studied in depth. Opportunities will 
be provided to initiate research studies. 

ED 593 Special Problems in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite: ED 411 or 
equivalent. Credits Arranged F,S,Sum. Opportunities for students to study current 
problems under the guidance of the staff. 

ED 594 Special Problems in Science Teaching. Prerequisite: ED 476 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. An investigation of current problems in science teaching with 
emphasis on areas of curriculum, methodology, facilities, supervision and research. 
Specific problems will be studied in depth. Opportunities will be provided to initiate 
research studies. 

ED 595 (I A 595) Industrial Arts Workshop. Prerequisite: One or more years of 
teaching experience. 3(3-0) Sum. A course for experienced teachers, administrators 
and supervisors of industrial arts. The primary purpose will be to develop sound 
principles and practices for initiating, conducting and evaluating programs in this 
field. Enrollees will pool their knowledge and practical experiences and will do 
intensive research work on individual and group programs. 



J 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 129 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College Education. Prerequi- 
site: Graduate standing. Credits Arranged. Study and scientific analysis of problems 
in adult education, and preparation of a scholarly research type of paper. 

ED 597 Special Problems in Education. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
consent of instructor. 1-3 F,S. This course is designed to provide graduate students 
in education the opportunity to study problem areas in professional education under 
the direction of a member of the graduate faculty. Graduate Staff 

ED 598 Concepts and Strategies of Understanding, Motivating and Teaching 
Disadvantaged Adults. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Designed to 
help adult educators acquire a comprehensive understanding of the educational, 
psychological, social, cultural, and economic problems of the culturally deprived 
segments of society. In-depth explorations of the theoretical basis for understanding, 
motivating and teaching disadvantaged adults will be interwoven with practical 
application of these bases to specific educational opportunities with the dis- 
advantaged adult learner. White 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. Prerequisites: ED 503, PS 502, SOC 54L 3(3-0) F,Sum. This 
course is designed for present and potential administrators interested in increasing 
their understanding of organization as a basis for administering effective Adult 
and Community College Education programs. Shearon 

ED 601 Administrative Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and Community 
College Education. Prerequisite: ED 600 or a comparable course(s) on organiza- 
tional theory. 3(3-0) S,Sum. Education 601 is designed for persons interested in 
building a more consistent philosophy of educational administration, extending and 
strengthening their understanding of administrative concepts and processes, im- 
proving their comprehension of the theoretical and research foundations upon which 
administrative processes are predicated, and increasing their ability to apply ad- 
ministrative concepts, theories and principles to the management of the complex 
educational system. George, Gragg 

ED 602 Curriculum. Prerequisite: PSY 535, PSY 510, ED 503 and/or a com- 
parable course in occupational education. 3(3-0) F,S. This course is designed to 
equip the student with the conceptual tools and intellectual skills needed to develop 
and critically assess curricula in all educational fields. The elements of the cur- 
riculum development process that are studied in the course include: Identification 
and formulation of educational objectives, selection of learning experiences, de- 
veloping and implementing plans for evaluating learning experiences and assessing 
educational outcomes, and staff-leader involvement in the curriculum development 
process. Parramore 

ED 603 Teaching Mathematics and Science in Higher Education. Prerequisites: 
ED 592 or ED 594, graduate standing, consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. This course is 
designed to provide an opportunity for graduate students and faculty to investigate 
the changing forces and values which are shaping the objectives of science and 
mathematics teaching. Attention will be given to the role of the college teacher in 
adapting to change and to developing college courses and curricula. 

ED 604 Curriculum Development and Evaluation in Science and Mathematics. 

Prerequisites: 500-level statistics, ED 615 or PSY 535; consent of instructor. 3(3-0) 



130 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

F,S. This course is desigrned to look critically at the elements in schools and society 
which shape the curricula of our schools, the mechanisms for curriculum change, 
and the role of formative and summative evaluation in determining the magnitude 
and direction of curriculum change in mathematics and science. 

ED 605 Education and Supervision of Teachers of M athematics and Science. Pre- 
requisites: ED 470 or ED 475 or equivalent, ED 592 or ED 594. 3(3-0) S. The class- 
room teacher needs help and leadership in curriculum implementation, teaching 
strategies, and professional philosophy. The supervisor must not only be sensitive to 
the needs and strengths of individuals with whom he works, but must also assume a 
leadership role in the administrative unit for which he is responsible. This course is 
designed to develop the competencies described, as well as to offer supervisory 
strategies through readings, role playing, and school experience. It is planned to 
take advantage of our proximity to the State Department of Public Instruction in 
providing further experiences. 

ED 608 Supervision of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education. Prerequisites: 
ED 527, ED 554, ED 609, ED 630 or equivalents. 3(3-0) F. An intensive study of 
the principles of supervision and the applications of these principles to the vocational 
and industrial arts education programs being conducted in secondary, post-second- 
ary and adult facilities. Emphasis is placed upon the competencies needed in super- 
visors in order to effectively discharge their responsibilities in such areas as teacher 
selection, teacher transfer and promotion, assistance in teacher professional growth, 
the conduct of workshops and in-service programs for professional and non-profes- 
sional staff, self-evaluative processes in education, curriculum generation and mod- 
ification, guidance and counseling provisions, and action research. 

Hanson, Nerden, Graduate Staff 

ED 609 Planning and Organizing Technical Education Programs. Prerequisites: 
ED 344, ED 420, ED 440, ED 516, PSY 304. 3(3-0) F,S. In this course a study will 
be made of the influences which impinge upon the development of programs of tech- 
nical education. Adequate opportunity will also be provided to examine in detail 
steps that may be taken to analyze needs for technical education, to organize for its 
provision, to study its offerings and to evaluate its results. 

ED 610 Administration of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education. Prerequi- 
sites: ED 527, ED 554, ED 609, ED 630 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. An intensive study 
of the major elements of administrative practice applied to vocational and industrial 
arts education, as it is being conducted in comprehensive high schools, compre- 
hensive community colleges, technical institutes and area vocational centers. 
Emphasis is placed upon leadership, personnel management, instructional program 
management and evaluation, public relations and financial management, in con- 
nection with preparatory, part-time, supplementary, extension and adult education 
programs of vocation and industrial arts education. 

Hanson, Nerden, Graduate Staff 

ED 611 Laws, Regulations and Policies Affecting Vocational Education. Prere- 
quisites: ED 527, ED 610 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. A detailed study of legislation, 
(national and state) which applies directly to occupational education. Basic social 
issues and economic conditions which precipitated the legislation will be studied j 
in depth. A review will also be made of the organizational structure and policies I 
under which national legislation is converted into programs of occupational 
education. 

ED 612 Finance, Accounting and Management of Vocational Education Programs. I 

Prerequisites: ED 527, ED 610 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the steps " 
which must be taken in financing a new vocational enterprise, following the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 131 

determination of curriculum by area study. Costs of operation, equipment purchase 
procedures, costs for construction, etc. will be investigated in detail. 

ED 614 Modern Principles and Practices in Secondary Education. Prerequisite: 
Twelve hours of education. 2(2-0) F,S. Foundations of modern programs of 
secondary education purposes, curriculum, organization, administration, and the 
place and importance of the high school in the community in relation to contem- 
porary social force. 

ED 615 Introduction to Educational Research. Prerequisite: PSY 535 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. An introductory course for students preparing for an 
advanced degree. The purposes are: to assist the student in understanding the 
meaning and purpose of educational research and the research approach to prob- 
lems; to develop the student's ability to identify educational problems; to plan and 
carry out research to solve these problems; to aid in the preparation of the research 
report. Special attention is given to tools and methods of research. Consideration 
is also given to the educator as a consumer of research. Kniefel 

ED 620 Cases in Educational Administration. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
and permission of instructor. 3(3-0) S,Sum. This course utilizes the case study and 
case simulation approach to the study of school administration. Administrative con- 
cepts will be developed and applied to simulated situations and to actual case his- 
tories. The administrative process is viewed as a decision-making process. The 
student will be expected to make decisions after considering alternative courses of 
action and after projecting probable consequences. Graduate Staff 

ED 621 Internship in Education. Prerequisites: Nine credit hours in graduate 
level courses and consent of instructor. 3-9 F,S,Sum. Utilizing the participant-obser- 
ver role, this course requires participation in selected educational situations with 
emphasis upon development of observational skills, ability to record relevant obser- 
vations by means of written journals, skills in analyzing experiences identifying 
critical incidents, and prediction of events and consequences. The student is 
required to develop possible alternative courses of action in various situations, 
select one of the alternatives and evaluate the consequences of the course of action 
selected. Graduate Staff 

ED 630 Philosophy of Industrial Arts. Prerequisite: Twelve hours in education. 
2(2-0) F,S. Origins, development of industrial arts education. Philosophical founda- 
tions, derivation of objectives and criteria for evaluation. Contributions of the 
heritage to contemporary concepts of industrial arts education. 

ED 631 Vocational Development Theory. Prerequisite: Six hours in education or 
psychology. 3(3-0) F. A study of the major theories and constructs of vocational 
development with implications for counseling and career planning. 

ED 633 Techniques of Counseling. Prerequisite: Nine hours from following fields: 
economics, education, psychology or sociology. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. ED 633 is a first 
course in counseling which combines the study of theory and philosophy in counsel- 
ing with techniques and practices in this field. Attention will also be paid to the 
concerns and characteristics of counselees and counselors as well as the education 
of counselors. The course is designed for majors and minors in the Department of 
Guidance and Personnel Services and those wishing to elect a beginning course in 
counseling. 

ED 635 Administration and Supervision of Industrial Arts. Prerequisite: Twelve 
hours in education. 2(2-0) F,S. Study of the problems and techniques of adminis- 
tration and supervision of industrial arts in school and university. Selection of 



132 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

teachers, teacher improvement methods. Public relations, facilities planning and 
specification. 

ED 636 Observation and Supervised Field Work. Prerequisite: Permission of 
instructor. Maximum 3 F,S. Provides opportunity for observation and practice of 
guidance and personnel services in schools, institutions of higher education, 
agencies, business and industry. 

ED 640 Individual and Group Appraisal II. Prerequisites: ED 540, ED 520, PSY 
535, or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Theory and evaluation of intelligence, aptitude and 
personality; laboratory in evaluating, administering, scoring, and interpreting tests 
of intelligence, aptitude, and personality; emphasis on use of test results in indivi- 
dual counseling and guidance. 

ED 641 Laboratory and Practicum Experiences in Counseling. Prerequisites: 
Advanced graduate standing, consent of instructor. 2-6 F,S,Sum. A practicum course 
in which the student participates in actual counseling experience under supervision 
in a school, college, social service agency, employment office and business or indus- 
trial establishment. The student may observe and participate in some personnel and 
guidance services and may study the organization and administration of the pro- 
gram. 

ED 660 (lA 660) Industrial Arts Curriculum. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. (See industrial 
arts education, page 120.) 

ED 664 Supervision in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite: ED 563 or equiva- 
lent. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Organization, administration, evaluation and possible improve- 
ment of supervisory practice; theory, principles and techniques of effective super- 
vision in agricultural education at different levels. 

ED 665 Supervising Student Teaching. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of education. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. A study of the program of student teaching in teacher education. 
Special consideration will be given the role of the supervising teacher including the 
following areas: planning for effective student teaching, observation and orienta- 
tion, school community study, analysis of situation, evaluating student teachers and 
coordination with North Carolina State University. Graduate Staff 

ED 666 Supervision of Counseling. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3(1-8) 
F,S,Sum. A supervised practicum for doctoral students in assisting with the super- 
vision of first year students in laboratory and practicum experiences in counseling. 

ED 688 Research Application in Occupational Education. Prerequisite: ED 615. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course will be concerned with methodology, application, 
analysis and synthesis of research in occupational education. A review of current 
occupational education studies, clustered by areas, will be made with attention to 
statistical techniques, data collecting, data handling, and the audience and impact of 
particular projects and research organizations. The class activities in research 
application are designed to bridge the gap between the theories of research method- 
ology and the student's independent research projects. Graduate Staff 

ED 689 Evaluation in Occupational Education. Prerequisites: ED 615, ST 513. 

3(3-0) F,S,Sum. This course will be concerned with the conceptual and method- 
ological aspects of occupational education evaluation, with attention to techniques 
for determining empirically the extent to which educational goals are being 
achieved, to locate the barriers to the advancement of these goals and to discover 
the consequences of educational programs. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 133 

ED 690 Seminar in Mathematics Education. Prerequisite: Departmental major or 
permission of instructor. Maximum 2 F,S. An in-depth examination and analysis of 
the literature and research in a particular topic (s) in mathematics education. Stu- 
dents will be expected to make presentations to the faculty and class on the topic 
under consideration. 

ED 691 Seminar in Industrial Education. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or con- 
sent of instructor. 1(1-0) F,S. Reviews and reports of topics of special interest to 
graduate students in industrial and technical education. The course will be offered 
in accordance with the availability of distinguished professors, and in response to 
indicated needs of the graduate students. 

ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
1(1-0) F,S. Reviews and reports on special topics of interest to students in industrial 
arts education. 

ED 693 Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education. Prerequisite: ED 554 or 
equivalent. Credits Arranged F,S,Sum. Study of current and advanced problems in 
the teaching and administration of educational programs, evaluation of procedures 
and consideration for improving. 

ED 694 Seminar in Agricultural Education. Maximum 2 1(1-0) F,S,Sum. A critical 
review of current problems, articles and books of interest to students of agricultural 
education. 

ED 695 Seminar in Science Education. Prerequisite: Departmental major or con- 
sent of instructor. Maximum 2 F,S. An in-depth examination and analysis of the 
literature and research in a particular topic(s) in science education. Students will 
be expected to make presentations to the faculty and class on the topic under con- 
sideration. 

ED 6% Seminar in Adult and Community College Education. Prerequisite: Grad- 
uate standing. 1-3 F,S. Identification and scientific analysis of major issues and 
problems relevant to adult education. Credit for this course will involve the active 
participation of the student in a formal seminar and the scientific appraisal and 
solution of a selected problem. The course is designed to help the student acquire a 
broad perspective of issues confronting adult educators and to acquire experiences 
in the scientific analysis and solution of specific issues. 

ED 697 (PSY 697) Advanced Seminar in Research Design. Prerequisites: Nine 
hours of statistical methods and research or approval of instructor, advanced gradu- 
ate status. 3(3-0) S. This course will be designed as a seminar-type course, with 
topics selected each semester in accordance with the interests and needs of the 
students. Attention will be given to the research strategies that underlie educa- 
tional and psychological research, to the development of theoretical constructs, to a 
critical review of research related to problems in which the students are interested, 
and to a systematic analysis and critique of research problems in which the students 
are engaged. Kniefel 

ED 698 Seminar in Occupational Education. Prerequisites: Nine hours of occupa- 
tional education or approval of instructor; advanced gfraduate status. 3(3-0) F,S, 
Sum. This course will be designed as a seminar-type course, with topics selected 
each semester. Attention will be given to the broad concepts of occupational educa- 
tion as manifested in the Vocational Education Amendments of 1968, and to the 
problems and issues underlying the development of and implementation of programs 
of occupational education at elementary junior high, senior high, and postsecondary 



134 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

levels, with emphasis on articulation between career choice and preparation for 
g^ainful employment. Coster 

ED 699 Research. Prerequisites: Fifteen hours, consent of adviser. Credits 
Arranged. Individual research on a specific problem of concern to the student. 



Electrical Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor G. B. Hoadley, Head 

Professor W. D. Stevenson J^.-Associate Head arid Graduate Administrator 

Professors: W. J. Barclay, A. R. Eckels, W. A. Flood, J. R. Hauser, N. F. J. 
Matthews, L K. Monteith, J. B. O'Neal, D. R. Rhodes, J. Staudhammer, 
F. J. Tischer; Adjunct Professors: G. K. Megla, J. J. Wortman; Associate 
Professors: N. R. Bell, A. J. Goetze, M. A. Littlejohn, E. G. MAN^aNG, 
W. C. Peterson; Adjunct Associate Professors: E. Christian, J. D. Spragins, 
M. G. Zaalouk; Assistant Professors: J. W. Gault, T. H. Glisson Jr., 
J. F. Kauffman, R. W. Stroh 

The Department of Electrical Engineering offers the degrees of Master of Elec- 
trical Engineering, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

Four core courses (EE 512, EE 520, EE 530, EE 540) are required for the Mas- 
ter of Electrical Engineering degree, and the student must pass an oral comprehen- 
sive examination. No thesis is required for this degree. 

The Master of Science degree has no specified course requirements but the stu- 
dent must pass an oral comprehensive examination. The thesis may account for as 
many as six semester hours. 

In the more advanced study for the doctorate, a comprehensive understanding of 
several fields of electrical engineering is required, and specialization appears in 
part of the course program and in the research problem undertaken. 

Advanced courses of a general and fundamental nature are required for those 
who plan to carry their advanced studies to the level of the doctorate. Minor 
sequences of study in advanced mathematics, physics or other appropriate disci- 
pline are planned to fit the needs of individual students. 

The laboratories in the department are well equipped for research in communi- 
cations, computers, electromagnetics, solid-state materials and devices, and auto- 
matic control. Active research is in progress in these and other areas. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 401 Advanced Electric Circuits. Prerequisites: EE 202, MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EE 403 Electric Network Design. Prerequisite: EE 401. 3(3-0) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 135 

EE 406 Dynamical Systems Analysis. Prerequisite: EE 202 or 331, EM 305, MA 
301. 3(3-0) F. 

EE 431 Electronics Engineering. Prerequisit?: EE 314. 3(2-3) F. 

EE 432 Communication Engineering. Prerequisite: EE 431. 3(2-3) S. 

EE 433 Electric Power Engineering. Prerequisite: EE 305 or EE 332. 3(2-3) S. 

EE 434 Power System Analysis. Prerequisite: EE 305. 3(3-0) F. 

EE 435 Elements of Control. Prerequisites: EE 314, EE 305. 3(2-3) F. 

EE 438 Electronic Instrumentation. Prerequisites: EE 314 or EE 332, MA 301. 

3(3-0) S. 

EE 440 Fundamentals of Digital Systems. Prerequisite: EE 314. 3(3-0) F,S. 

EE 441 Introduction to Electron Devices. Prerequisites: MA 301, PY 207, or PY 
208. 3(3-0) F. 

EE 442 Introduction to Solid-State Devices. Prerequisites: EE 441 or PY 407, MA 
301. 3(3-0) S. 

EE 445 Introduction to Antennas. Prerequisites: EE 304, EE 314. 3(2-3) F. 

EE 448 Introduction to Microwaves. Prerequisites: EE 304, EE 314. 3(2-3) S. 

EE 492 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 
3(3-0 to 0-9) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EE 503 Computer-Aided Circuit Analysis. Prerequisites: EE 314, EE 401, B aver- 
age in electrical engineering and mathematics. 3(3-0) F. Analysis of electrical cir- 
cuits with emphasis on computer methods. Steady-state and transient analysis of 
linear and nonlinear networks; tolerance analysis; programming considerations. 

Staudhammer 

EE 504 Introduction to Network Synthesis. Prerequisites: EE 401, B average in 
electrical engineering and mathematics. 3(3-0) S. A study of the properties of net- 
work functions and the development of the methods of network synthesis of one-port 
and two-port passive structures. Hoadley 

EE 511 Electronic Circuits. Prerequisites: EE 314, B average in electrical engi- 
neering and mathematics. 3(3-0) F. Electronic amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, 
switches, converters, and systems design with integrated circuits. Communications, 
power and industrial applications. Barclay 

EE 512 Communication Theory. Prerequisites: EE 314, B average in electrical 
engineering and mathematics. 3(3-0) F. Communication signals in the frequency and 
time domains. Probability and associated functions, random signal theory, modula- 
tion and frequency translation, noise, sampling theory and correlation functions. 
Principles of information theory. Fundamentals of encoding. Accent on methods and 
problems unique to the field of digital communication. (Offered fall every 
year, spring 1974 and summer 1976.) Barclay, O'Neal, Stroh 



136 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

EE 516 Feedback Control Systems. Prerequisites: EE 435 or EE 401, B average 
in electrical engineering and mathematics. 3(3-0) S. Study of feedback systems for 
automatic control of physical quantities such as voltage, speed and mechanical posi- 
tion. Theory of regulating systems and servo-mechanisms. Steady-state and tran- 
sient responses. Evaluation of stability. Transfer function loci and root locus plots. 
Analysis using differential equation and operational methods. System compensation 
and introduction to design. Peterson 

EE 517 Control Laboratory. Corequisite: EE 516. 3(0-3) S. Laboratory study of 
feedback systems for automatic control of physical quantities such as voltage, speed 
and mechanical position. Characteristics of reg^ilating systems and servomechan- 
isms. The laboratory work is intended to contribute to an understanding of the 
theory developed in EE 516. Peterson 

EE 520 Fundamentals of Logic Systems. Prerequisites: EE 314, B average in 
electrical engineering and mathematics. 3(3-0) F. A study of elementary machine 
language theory, logic algebras, computer organization, and logic design. Introduc- 
tory combination and sequential logic, including circuits, basic building blocks and 
realizations. (Offered fall every year, summer 1974 and spring 1976.) 

Bell, Gault, Staudhammer 

EE 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design. Prerequisite: EE 520. 3(3-0) S. 
A study of the internal organization and structure of digital systems including 
gates, toggle circuits, pulse circuitry and advanced machine language theory. 
Analysis and synthesis of the major components of computers, including the logic 
section, storage devices, registers, input-output and control. Bell, Staudhammer 

EE 530 Physical Electronics. Prerequisites: EE 304, B average in electrical engi- 
neering and mathematics. 3(3-0) F. A study of behavior of charged particles under 
the influence of fields and in solid materials. Quantum mechanics, particle statistics, 
semi-conductor properties, fundamental particle transport properties and lasers. 
(Offered fall every year, spring 1975 and summer 1977.) Hauser 

EE 533 Integrated Circuits. Prerequisites: EE 314, B average in electrical engi- 
neering and mathematics. 3(3-0) S. A study of the implementation of solid state cir- 
cuits in integrated form. Includes thin film, bipolar and MOS technologies and their 
application to digital and linear systems. Manning 

EE 535 (MAE 535) Gas Lasers. 3(3-0) F,S. (See mechanical and aerospace engi- 
neering, page 195.) 

EE 540 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves. Prerequisites: EE 304, B average in 
electrical engineering and mathematics. 3(3-0) F. Basic laws and concepts of static 
and dynamic electromagnetic fields. Fundamental equations and their applications. 
Fundamentals, forms and applications of Maxwell's equations. Vector and scalar 
potentials, relativistic aspects of fields, energy and power. Waves in unbounded and 
bounded regions, radiation, waveguides and resonators. Geometrical and physical 
optics. (Offered fall every year and svunmer 1975.) Tischer 

EE 545 Introduction to Radio Wave Propagation, Prerequisites: EE 304, B aver- 
age in electrical engineering and mathematics. 3(3-0) S. Characteristics of plane 
electromagnetic waves in homogeneous and nonhomogeneous media with applica- 
tion to tropospheric and ionospheric propagation. Relationships between electron 
density, collision frequency and complex refractive index, theory of the formation 
and dynamics of ionospheric layers and theorems for the prediction of ionospheric 
propagation. Flood 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 137 

EE 591, 592 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering. Prerequisite: B average in 
technical subjects. 3(3-0) F,S. A two-semester sequence to develop new courses and 
to allow qualified students to explore areas of special interest. Graduate Staff 

EE 593 Individual Topics in Electrical Engineering. Prerequisite: B average in 
technical subjects. 1-3 F,S. A course providing an opportunity for individual stu- 
dents to explore topics of special interest under the direction of a member of the 
faculty. 

EE 610 Non-Linear Analysis. Prerequisites: EE 516, MA 405. 3(3-0) F. Methods 
of analysis of non-linear systems. Linear stability criteria applied to certain non- 
linear systems. Liapunov stability for dynamic systems in general. Optimal control 
systems with quadratic index of performance. (Offered 1975-76 and alternate years.) 

Goetze 

EE 611 Digital Filtering. Prerequisite: EE 504. 3(3-0) S. Theory of digital signal 
processing: the sampling theorem, A/D and D/A conversion, and Z-transforms. 
Digital filter design techniques including impulse invariance, the bilinear Z-trans- 
form and high speed convolution via the Fast Fourier Transform. Finite word length 
effects: quantization noise, stability, limit cycles. Hardware organization and speed 
considerations. Glisson, Stroh 

EE 613, 614 Advanced Feedback Control. Prerequisite: EE 516. 3(3-0) F,S. An 
advanced study of feedback systems for the control of physical variables. Follower 
systems and regulators. Mathematical description of systems by use of state vari- 
ables. Stability theory and performance criteria. Sensitivity analysis. Introduction 
to non-linear systems and optimization theory. Continuous and sampled data sys- 
tems. Peterson 

EE 616 Microwave Electronics. Prerequisite: EE 540. 3(3-0) S. Limitations im- 
posed by frequency on electronic devices and circuits. Microwave power generation, 
amplification and control by use of vacuum, gas and solid-state devices including 
klystrons, masers, traveling-wave tubes, tunnel and Gunn effect diodes. Measure- 
ment problems and techniques in the microwave region. (Offered 1975-76 and alter- 
nate years.) Barclay 

EE 617 Pulse and Digital Circuits. Prerequisite: EE 533. 3(3-0) S. Integrated and 
discrete circuit techniques for the production, shaping and control of nonsinusoidal 
wave forms. Fundamental circuits and systems needed in digital information sys- 
tems, instrumentation and computers. Barclay 

EE 618 Antennas and Radiation. Prerequisite: EE 540. 3(3-0) S. A research 
course in radiating electromagnetic systems. Physical principles of analysis and 
synthesis of antennas as derived from the Maxwell theory of electromag:netism. 
Investigation of radiative and reactive properties. Conditions for physical realiz- 
ability. Construction of realizable aperture distributions and space factors. (Offered 
1974-75 and alternate years.) Rhodes 

EE 619 Applied Electromagnetic Fields and Waves. Prerequisite: EE 540. 3(3-0) 
S. A study of networks at frequencies above 100 MHz. General waveguides and 
resonators as elements of transmission systems, circuitry, and components. Funda- 
mentals of guided waves and their applications. Network elements, resonators, and 
filters with distributed parameters. Optical wavegn^ides (fiber optics). Integration 
with active devices in mixers, multipliers, oscillators, and parametric devices. 

Tischer 

EE 622 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Materials I. Prerequisite: EE 530. 
3(3-0) S. A study of the electronic properties of solids; details of crystal structure, 



138 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

lattice properties and electronic energry states. Emphasis on properties of special 
importance in solid-state devices. Littlejohn 

EE 623 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Materials II. Prerequisite: EE 622. 
3(3-0) F. Detailed treatment of thermal and electrical transport phenomena, equili- 
brium and non-equilibrium semiconductor statistics. Also optical properties and hot 
electron effects in solid-state materials. Littlejohn 

EE 624 Electronic Properties of Solid-State Devices. Prerequisite: EE 530. 3(3-0) 
S. Physical properties of devices, I-V characteristics, power and frequency limita- 
tions, and small signal equivalent circuits of diodes, bipolar transistors, junction 
FET's, Schottky barrier FET's, MOS transistors, and charge coupled devices. 
(Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) Hauser 

EE 625 Advanced Solid-State Device Theory. Prerequisite: EE 624. 3(3-0) F. A 
study of the latest development in solid-state devices. The properties of metal-insu- 
lator-semiconductor devices, high-field devices and optical devices. Emphasis on the 
basic fundamental physical principles of operation as opposed to circuit applica- 
tions. (Offered 1975-76 and alternate years.) Hauser 

EE 640 Advanced Logic Circuits. Prerequisite: EE 520. 3(3-0) S. A study of state- 
of-the art concepts in the area of logic circuits. Threshold logic, multi-valued logic, 
universal logic modules, and cellular arrays. Current developments in the theory of 
logic systems. Bell, Gault 

EE 641 Sequential Machines. Prerequisite: EE 520. 3(3-0) F. The study of finite 
automata, both synchronous and asynchronous. Machine equivalence and minimiza- 
tion, state identification and the state assigniiTient problem. Flip-flop activation from 
the state diagram and other realization techniques, Gault, Staudhammer 

EE 642 Automata and Adaptive Systems. Prerequisite: EE 520. 3(3-0) S. The 
study of neural nets in natural systems, artificial nerve nets, artificial intelligence, 
goal-directed behavior, the logic of automata and adaptive Boolean logic. Comput- 
ability, Turing machines and recursive function theory. Bell, Gault 

EE 651 Statistical Communication Theory. Prerequisites: EE 401, EE 512 or MA 
541 (ST 541). 3(3-0) S. Generalized waveform analysis including Fourier transforms, 
correlation functions and other statistical descriptions of stationary random pro- 
cesses; manipulation of signal descriptions as affected by linear time-invariant net- 
works; derivation of the optimum impulse response and transfer function of the gen- 
eral linear operator; optimum filter synthesis by the use of orthonormal functions; 
problems to illustrate the applications of the theory. Glisson, O'Neal, Stroh 

EE 652 Information Theory. Prerequisite: EE 512. 3(3-0) F. Definition of a mea- 
sure of information and a study of its properties, information sources and their effi- 
cient representation, communication channels and their capacity, encoding and de- 
coding of data for transmission over noisy channels, source encoding systems, error 
correcting codes, rate distortion bounds. (Offered 1975-76 and alternate years.) 

O'Neal, Stroh 

EE 654 Communication Systems Analysis. Prerequisite: EE 512. 3(3-0) S. Tools 
for the analysis of RF and optical communication systems — information symbols, 
communication path, information content, and entropy and redundancy of an infor- 
mation source. Properties of the communication channel including propagation 
media and losses, antennas, signal processing and signal quality. The analysis of 
terrestrial, extraterrestrial and hydrospace systems. Megla, Flood 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 139 

EE 655 Wave Phenomena in Plasma. Prerequisite: EE 540. 3(3-0) S. Discussion, 
demonstration, and analysis of wave phenomena and oscillations in plasma. Elec- 
tron and ion orbits, plasma characteristics and their derivation. Statistical particle 
dynamics and wave interaction. Plasma diagnostics. Laboratory demonstrations of 
field interactions, oscillations and waves. Applications in energy conversion and 
generation. (Offered 1975-76 and alternate years.) Tischer 

EE 659 Pattern Recognition. Prerequisite: EE 512. 3(3-0) F. A study of pattern 
recognition techniques, including discriminant functions, parametric and nonpara- 
metric training methods, multilayered networks and feature extraction, classifica- 
tion schemes; principal component analysis, discriminant analysis, clustering tech- 
niques. Applications to topics of current interest. Goetze 

EE 691, 692 Special Studies in Electrical Engineering. 3(3-0) F,S. An opportunity 
for small groups of advanced graduate students to study topics in their special fields 
of interest under the direction of members of the graduate faculty. 

EE 695 Electrical Engineering Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in elec- 
trical engineering. 1(1-0) F,S. A series of papers and conferences participated in by 
the instructional staff, invited guests and students who are candidates for advanced 
degrees. Graduate Staff 

EE 699 Electrical Engineering Research. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in 
electrical engineering, consent of adviser. Credits Arranged. Graduate Staff 



Engineering Mechanics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor P. H. McDonald, Head 

Professor R. A. Douglas, Associate Head 

Professors: T. S. Chang, J. A. Edwards, J. F. Ely; Professor Emeritus: A. 
Mitchell; Associate Professors: W. L. Bingham, M. H. Clayton, E. D. 
GuRLEY, Y. HoRiE, C. J. Maday, F. Y. Sorrell; Assistant Professors: H. M. 
EcKERLiN, T. E. Smith; Adjunct Assistant Professor: D. I. McRee 

The Department of Engineering Mechanics offers graduate programs leading to 
the Master of Science, Master of Engineering Mechanics and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. 

Graduate studies in Engineering Mechanics embrace several broad areas inclu- 
ding continuum theory, dynamics and systems, fluid mechanics and solid mechan- 
ics. Mechanics of materials, structural mechanics and space mechanics are also 
areas of importance. Professional interests of the faculty are represented by courses 
devoted to elastic and plastic behavior of solids, viscous and compressible fluid 
flow, the generalized continuum behavior of matter and the theory of vibrations. 

Graduate research in any of the areas outlined may follow either analytical or 
experimental lines of investigation, and the department seeks to further both in 
good balance and mutual support. Particulariy encouraged is the development of 
new research methods and techniques, and the laboratories complex of the depart- 



140 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

ment is aptly suited to contemporary research. A well -equipped and staffed instru- 
ment and model shop is especially helpful in furthering graduate research. 

The faculty offer a range of courses both for Engineering Mechanics majors and 
for inclusion in the programs of students in allied areas of engineering and physical 
and mathematical sciences. EM 501, 502, Continuum Mechanics I, II, for master's 
degree students, and EM 601, 602, Unifying Concepts in Mechanics I, II, for Ph.D. 
candidates, are especially recommended. Interdisciplinary programs in mechanics, 
electrotechnics and materials are encouraged. Serving as a teaching or research 
assistant is considered to be highly valuable experience during the program of 
studies. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

EM 501, 502 Continuum Mechanics I, II. Prerequisites: EM 301, EM 303, MAE 
301, MA 405. 3(3-0) F,S. The concepts of stress and strain are presented in general- 
ized tensor form. Emphasis is placed on the discussion and relative comparisons of 
the analytical models for elastic, plastic, fluid, viscoelastic, granular and porous 
media. The underlying thermodynamic principles are presented, the associated 
boundary value problems are formulated and selected examples are used to illus- 
trate the theory. T. S. Chang 

EM 503 Theory of Elasticity I. Prerequisite: EM 301; Corequisite: MA 511 or MA 
401. 3(3-0) F. The fundamental equations governing the behavior of an elastic solid 
are developed in various curvilinear coordinate systems. Plane problems, as well as 
the St. Venant Problem of Bending, Torsion and Extension of bars are covered. Dis- 
placement fields, stress fields, Airy and complex stress functions are among the 
methods used to obtain solutions. Douglas, T. E. Smith 

EM 504 Mechanics of Ideal Fluids. Prerequisite: EM 304; Corequisite: MA 513. 
3(3-0) F. Basic equations of ideal fluid flow; potential and stream functions; vortex 
dynamics; body forces due to flow fields, methods of singularities in two-dimen- 
sional flows; analytical determination of potential functions; conformal transforma- 
tions; free-streamline flows. Edwards, Sorrell 

EM 505 Mechanics of Viscous Fluids I. Prerequisite: EM 304; Corequisite: MA 
532. 3(3-0) S. Equations of motion of a viscous fluid (Navier-Stokes Equations); 
general properties of the Navier-Stokes equations; some exact solutions of the 
Navier-Stokes equations; boundary layer equations; some approximate methods of 
solution of the boundary layer equations; laminar boundary layers in axisymmetric 
and three-dimensional flows; unsteady laminar boundary layers. Edwards, Sorrell 

EM 506 Mechanics of Compressible Fluids I. Prerequisites: EM 304, MAE 302; 
Corequisite: MA 532. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to the flow of a compressible fluid: ther- 
modynamics and one-dimensional energy equation for a compressible gas. Acoustics, 
normal shock waves and expansion waves, shock tube theory, general one-dimen- 
sional flow and flow in ducts and channels. Sorrell 

EM 507 Systems Analysis. Prerequisites: EM 305, MA 405. 3(3-0) F. A study of 
the analysis of dynamical systems. With the employment of state variable techni- 
ques, the qualitative features and fundamental concepts of the engineering system 
are examined. Eckerlin, McDonald 

EM 508 Systems Synthesis. Prerequisite: EM 507. 3(3-0) S. A study of the synthe- 
sis of dynamical systems. The modem approach to systems synthesis is employed 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 141 

through the application of variational principles and optimization techniques. 

Eckerlin, McDonald 

EM 509 Space Mechanics I. Prerequisites: EM 302, EM 304; Corequisite: MA 511. 
3(3-0) F. The application of mechanics to the analysis and design of orbits and tra- 
jectories. Trajectory computation and optimization; space maneuvers; re-entry tra- 
jectories; interplanetary guidance. Clayton, Maday 

EM 510 Space Mechanics II. Prerequisites: EM 509, MA 511. 3(3-0) F. Continua- 
tion EM 509. The analysis and design of guidance systems. Basic sensing devices; 
the characteristics of an inertial space; the theory of stabilized platforms; terres- 
trial inertial guidance. Clayton, Maday 

EM 511 Theory of Plates and Shells. Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 511. 3(3-0) F. 
Bending theory of thin plates; geometry of surfaces and stresses in shells. Various 
methods of analysis are discussed and illustrated by problems of practical interest. 

Bingham, Clayton, Gurley 

EM 521, 522 Properties of Solids I, II. Prerequisites: EM 307, MAT 301, PY 413. 
3(3-0) F. Atomic and molecular principles are applied toward an introductory under- 
standing of macroscopic material properties. The concept of the grand canonical 
ensemble average of atomic behavior is employed to unify the characterization and 
interrelationships of material properties. Finally, phenomenological behaviors and 
coupled effects are described within the continuum concept. Horie 

EM 551 Advanced Strength of Materials. Prerequisite: EM 301. 3(3-0) F. Stresses 
and strains at a point; rosette analysis; stress theories, stress concentration and 
fatigue; plasticity; inelastic, composite and curved beams; prestress energy 
methods; shear deflections; buckling problems and colimin design; and membrane 
stresses in shells. Gurley 

EM 552 Elastic Stability. Prerequisites: EM 551, MA 301, MA 405. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of elastic and plastic stability. The stability criterion as a determinant. The 
energy method and the theorem of stationary potential energy. The solution of buck- 
ling problems by finite differences and the calculus of variations. The application of 
successive approximations to stability problems. Optimization applied to problems 
of aeroelastic and civil engineering structures. Gurley 

EM 555 Dynamics I. Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 405. 3(3-0) F. The theory of 
vibrations from the Lagrangian formulation of the equations of motion. Free and 
forced vibrations with and without damping, multiple degrees of freedom, coupled 
motion, normal mode vibrations, wave propagation in solid bodies. 

Clayton, Maday 

EM 556 Dynamics II. Prerequisites: EM 301, MA 405. 3(3-0) S. The dynamics of 
particles and rigid bodies by the use of formulations of the laws of mechanics due 
to Newton, Euler, Lagrange and Hamilton. Accelerated reference frames, con- 
straints, Euler's angles, the spinning top, the gyroscope, precession, stability, phase 
space and nonlinear oscillatory motion. Clayton, Maday 

EM 590 (PHI 590, REL 590) Technology and Human Values. Prerequisites: A 
baccalaureate degree in a recognized field of engineering, liberal arts, science or 
social science; or, for advanced undergraduates in these fields, two or more courses 
such as HI 341, UNI 301, 302, UNI 401, or six hours in philosophy. 3(3-0) F. An 
exploration from two or more disciplinary perspectives (notably those of ethical 
theory and cybernetic information theory) of the range of ways of conceptualizing 
the relationship between the technologies of a society and the values of that society, 



142 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

and in areas of particular interest to students, a detailed analysis of contemporary 
instances of the interrelation of technology and human values. 

McDonald, Shriver 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

EM 601, 602 Unifying Concepts in Mechanics L H. Prerequisite: PY 503 or EM 
501. 3(3-0) F,S. Generalized treatment of the fundamental equations and boundary 
value problems of continuous and noncontinuous media. Use is made of con- 
temporary developments in irreversible thermodynamics, statistical mechanics and 
electrodynamics to provide a unified foundation for the development of principles 
governing the dynamic and thermodynamic behavior of elastic, plastic and visco- 
elastic solids, viscous fluids and rheological media. Chang, McDonald 

EM 603 Theory of Elasticity IL Prerequisite: EM 503; Corequisite: MA 513. 
3(3-0) S. An extension of EM 503 to include the Cauchy Integral methods for plane 
problems, three-dimensional problems, variational methods and the use of numerical 
methods. Ely, T. E. Smith 

EM 604 Theory of Plasticity. Prerequisite: EM 503. 3(3-0) S. Analytical models 
are developed to represent the behavior of deformable solids in the plastic regime. 
Conditions of yielding and fracture which initiate and terminate plastic behavior 
are studied, with the special stress-strain relationships necessary in plasticity. 
The hyperbolic equations of slipline fields characteristic of plane strain theory are 
developed. Douglas, Horie 

EM 605, 606 (MAS 605, 606; OY 605, 606) Advanced Geophysical Fluid Mechan- 
ics L IL 3(3-0) F,S. (See physical oceanography, page 214.) 

EM 611 Mechanics of Compressible Fluids IL Prerequisite: EM 506. 3 S. A con- 
tinuation of EM 506. Linearized theory of two- and three-dimensional supersonic 
flow past bodies. Oblique shock waves and method of characteristics for two- 
dimensional supersonic flow. Unsteady supersonic flow and compressible flow with 
viscosity and heat transfer. Sorrell 

EM 612 Mechanics of Viscous Fluids IL Prerequisite: EM 505. 3 F. Continuation 
of EM 505, phenomenological theories of turbulence, turbulent flow in ducts and 
pipes, turbulent boundary layer with and without pressure gradient, compressible 
boundary layer, boundary layer control and free viscous flow. Sorrell, Edwards 

EM 613, 614 (MAS 613, 614; OY 613, 614) Perturbation Method in Fluid Mechan- 
ics I, II. 3(3-0) F,S. (See physical oceanography, page 214.) 

EM 621 Properties of Materials at Low Temperatures. Prerequisites: EM 301, 
EM 521 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Recent developments in low-ten\perature theory 
and applications of materials are presented starting with the theory of atomic 
processes which govern low-temperature behavior. A study of the current models 
of the dominant physical processes at low temperatures is applied to mechanical, 
thermal and electrical behavior, including superconductivity and superfluidity. 
Results are applied toward prediction and correlation of properties at higher 
temperatures where the governing physical processes are more interrelated. 

Horie 

EM 631, 632 (OR 631, 632) Variational Methods in Optimization Techniques I, IL 

3(3-0) F,S. (See operations research, page 212.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 143 

EM 641 Optical Mechanics. Prerequisite: EM 312. 3(2-3) S. Concepts of crystal 
optics applied to continua deformed statically or dynamically by mechanical load- 
ing; optical interference and its use as a measuring technique of absolute and 
relative retardations in various types of interferometers; relative retardation 
measurements; deformation measurements with diffraction gratings; Moire 
(mechanical) interference measurements. Bingham 

EM 656 Nonlinear Vibrations. Prerequisite: EM 555. 3(3-0) F,S. Free and forced 
vibrations of systems with nonlinear restoring forces and self-sustained oscillations. 
Approximation techniques applied to nonlinear differential equations. Comparisons 
with exact solutions when possible. Emphasis placed on understanding properties 
unique to nonlinear systems. Clayton 

EM 695 Experimental Methods in Mechanics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
3(2-3) S. A study of specialized experimental techniques utilized in contemporary 
research in the areas of mechanics. Messrs. Bingham, Douglas, Edwards 

EM 697 Seminar in Mechanics. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, consent of 
adviser. 1(1-0) F,S. The discussion and development of theory relating to con- 
temporary research in the frontier areas of mechanics. Chang, Douglas 

EM 698 Special Topics in Mechanics. Credits Arranged. The study, by small 
groups of graduate students under the direction of members of the faculty, of topics 
of particular interest in various advanced phases of mechanics. Graduate Staff 

EM 699 Research in Mechanics. Credits Arranged. Individual research in the 
field of mechanics. Graduate Staff 



English 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. S. Champion, Head 

Professor R. B. White Jr., Assistant Head 

Associate Professor J. D. Durant, Director of the Graduate Program 

Professors: M. Halperen, H. G. Kincheloe, A. S. Knowles, B. G. Koonce Jr., 
F. H. Moore, G. Owen Jr., C. A. Parker, W. B. Toole III, P. Williams 
Jr.; Professors Emeriti: L. C. Hartley, R. G. Walser; Associate Professors: 
L. J. Betts Jr., P. E. Blank Jr., E. P. Dandridge Jr., W. G. Franklin, H. A. 
Hargrave, W. E. Meyers, A. F. Stein, T. N. Walters; Assistant Professors: 
R. A. Lasseter, M. S. Reynolds, D. D. Short, H. C. West, Mary Cameron 
Williams 

The Department of English offers instruc-tion leading to the Miister of Arts 
degree with specialization in English and American literature. The program is 
designed either to provide the student with a tennina! course of study or to serve 
as the fust year toward a doctorate. 

A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit is required, though the 
program may be expanded to meet the needs of individual students. 



144 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Assistantships for promising students are available. These students will take 
ENG 504 in the fall semester and devote half time in the fall and spring semesters 
to the teaching of courses in fieshman composition under supervision. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENG 504 Problems in College Composition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
or graduate standing. 3(3-0) F. Directed study of the development of rhetorical 
skills in composition in classroom situations. Betts, Walters 

ENG 524 Modern English Usage. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate 
standing. 3(3-0) S. An intensive study of English grammar, with attention to new 
developments in structural linguistics and with emphasis on current usage. 

Meyers, Short 

ENG 526 History of the English Language. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
or graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. A survey of the growth and development of the 
language from its Indo-European beginnings to the present. Meyers, Short 

ENG 561 Milton. Prerequisite: ENG 261 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. An intensive 
reading of Milton with attention to background materials in the history and culture 
of seventeenth-century England. Moore, White 

ENG 575 Southern Writers. Prerequisite: ENG 266 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A 
survey of the particular contribution of the South to American literature, with 
intensive study of selected major figures. Kincheloe, West 

ENG 578 English Drama to 1642. Prerequisite: ENG 261 or equivalent 3(3-0) F. 
Intensive study of the English drama from its liturgical beginnings to the closing 
of the theatres, excluding Shakespeare. Champion, Meyers 

ENG 579 English Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. Pre- 
requisite: ENG 261 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Intensive study of the English drama 
from 1660 to 1800. Durant, Moore 

ENG 590 Literary Criticism. Prerequisite: ENG 261 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 
An examination of the critical process as it leads to the definition and analysis of 
literature, together with attention to the main literary traditions and conventions. 

Durant, P. Williams 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENG 608 Bibliography and Methodology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) 
F,S. An investigation of the materials of literary research and scholarship; an intro- 
duction to varying scholarly approaches to literary problems leading to development 
of the student's ability to evaluate and use with discrimination the work of scholars 
in his field. Graduate Staff 

ENG 609 Old English Literature. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. An 
introduction to the language and literature of the Old English period (450-1100). 
Readings will be in the original and will include both poetry and prose. 

Koonce, Short 

ENG 610 Middle English Literature. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) F.A 
study of major works of medieval English literature (exclusive of Chaucer) in the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 145 

light of dominant intellectual and artistic traditions; emphasis is on four works: 
Piers Ploivman, Pearl, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Malory's Morte 
Darthur. (Offered in 1974 and 1976.) Koonce, Short 

ENG 615 American Literature of the Colonial Period. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 3(3-0) F. A study of American literature and thought from the beginnings 
to the adoption of the Constitution. (Offered in 1975.) West 

ENG 620 16th-century Non-Dramatic English Literature. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 3(3-0) F. A detailed survey of non-dramatic prose and verse of the six- 
teenth century against the background of Humanism with the consequent assimila- 
tion of classical and continental literary subjects and forms. Blank 

ENG 630 nth-Century English Literature. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
3(3-0) S. A close examination of the literature of England from 1600 to 1700 with 
emphasis on major literary figures and movements, the development of important 
literary forms and genres, and the intimate relationship between the literature of 
this period and its philosophical, political, and theological backgrounds. 

Moore, White 

ENG 650 19th-century English Literature: The Romantic Period. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 3(3-0) F. A detailed study of the six major romantic poets — 
Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats; some attention as well to 
the political, social, and literary background and to a few minor writers and critics. 

Hargrave, P. Williams 

ENG 651 Studies in Chaucer. Prerequisite: ENG 451 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. An 
intensive study of the Chaucer canon requiring independent research. Koonce 

ENG 655 19th-century American Literature: The Romantic Period. Prerequisite: 
Graduate standing. 3(3-0) F. A study of the selected works of Poe, Hawthorne, 
Melville, Emerson, and Thoreau, with emphasis on their varied contributions to the 
literature and thought of the American romantic movement. Kincheloe, Stein 

ENG 658 Studies in Shakespeare: The Tragedies. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 3(3-0) F. An intensive study — textual and critical — of Shakespeare's tragedies. 

Blank, Champion 

ENG 659 Studies in Shakespeare: The Comedies. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 3(3-0) S. An intensive study — textual and critical — of Shakespeare's comedies. 

Blank, Champion 

ENG 660 Victorian Poetry. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. Studies in 
the poetry of Victorian England: 1837-1901; the major poets, movements, and ques- 
tions in their historical contexts, religious, political, and aesthetic. (Offered in 1974 
and 1976.) Hargrave, Lasseter 

ENG 661 Victorian Prose. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. Studies in 
the non-fiction prose of Victorian England: 1830-1900. The major essayists and in- 
tellectual movements of the Victorian period in their religious, social and aesthetic 
contexts. (Offered in 1975.) Hargrave, Lasseter 

ENG 662 ISth-Century English Literature. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
3(3-0) F. The major figures in English literature between 1660 and 1790 against the 
background of social, cultural and religious change. Durant, White 

ENG 665 19th-century American Literature: Realism and Naturalism. Prerequi- 
site: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. Concentration on Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, 



146 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

James, and Dreiser, with briefer attention to Howells, Crane, Norris, and other 
realists and naturalists. Kincheloe, Stein 

ENG 670 20th-century British Prose. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. 
An examination of the works of the major British writers and literary movements of 
this century and their historical context, religious, political, and aesthetic. (Offered 
in 1974 and 1976.) Halperen, Knowles 

ENG 671 20th-century British Poetry. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. 
The development of English poetry from the rebellion against Victorian and Pre- 
Raphaelite verse to the present post-war scene; special attention to Hardy, Yeats, 
Eliot, Auden, and Thomas. (Offered in 1975.) Owen 

ENG 675 20th-century American Prose. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) 
F. An examination of representative American writers of the novel and short fiction. 
(Offered in 1974 and 1976.) Knowles 

ENG 676 20th-century American Poetry. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) 
F. The development of modern American poetry from the rebellion against the 
romantic and genteel verse of the 1890's; special attention to Robinson, Frost, 
Pound, Williams, Stevens, and Ransom. (Offered in 1975.) Owen 

ENG 680 20th-century British Drama. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) 
S. A survey of modem British drama from its beginnings at the turn of the century 
to the present. (Offered in 1974 and 1976.) Halperen 

ENG 681 20th-century American Drama. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3 
(3-0) S. A survey of modern American drama centering on major figures. (Offered 
in 1975.) Halperen 

ENG 692 Special Topics in American Literature. Prerequisite: Consent of seminar 
chairman. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study, involving independent research and cen- 
tering on some limited topic from American literature. Graduate Staff 

ENG 693 Special Topics in English Literature. Prerequisite: Consent of seminar 
chairman. 3(3-0) F,S. An intensive study, involving independent research and cen- 
tering on some limited topic from English literature. Graduate Staff 

ENG 699 Research in Literature (Thesis). Prerequisite: Consent of graduate ad- 
viser. Credits Arranged F,S. Independent investigation of an advanced literary or 
linguistic problem leading to the writing of a master's thesis. Graduate Staff 



Entomology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor K. L. Knight, Head 

Professors: R. C. Axtell, C. H. Brett, W. V. Campbell, W. C. Dauterman, 
M. H. Farrier, F. E. Guthrie, E. Hodgson, W. J. Mistric Jr., H. H. 
Neunzjg, R. L. Rabb, T. J. Sheets, C. F. Smith, D. A. Young Jr.; 
Professor Emeritus: T. B. Mitchell; Adjunct Professors: J. R. Fouts, Louise 
M. Russell, C. W. Sabrosky; Extension Professors: R. L. Robertson, G. T. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 147 

Weekman; Associate Professors: J. R. Bradley, W. M. Brooks, H. B. Moore, 
G. C. Rock, C. G. Wright, R. T. Yamamoto; Adjunct Associate Professor A. 
L. Chasson; Extension Assistant Professors: J. R. Baker, K. A. Sorensen; 
Visiting Assistant Professor: R. E. Stinner 

The Department of Entomology offers graduate training leading to the Master of 
Agriculture, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Major areas of 
specialization are: acarology, agiicultural entomology, behavior, biochemistry and 
toxicology, ecology, extension entomology, invertebrate pathology, medical and 
veterinary entomology, nutrition, pesticide analysis, pest management and taxon- 
omy. 

Opportunities exist for training in both applied and fundamental phases of ento- 
mology and invertebrate biology. Population management concepts are empha- 
sized in the applied entomology and pest management programs. The applied 
phases are influenced by the state's agriculture, in which tobacco, cotton, peanuts, 
soybeans, fruit, vegetables, livestock and forestry are important components. The 
rapidly expanding tourist industry and the diverse habitats of the state, extending 
from the mountains to the sea, provide unique opportunities for research on insects 
and related arthropods affecting man. A cooperative arrangement with the School 
of Forest Resources provides a major in forest entomology. The program in medical 
and veterinary entomology includes both applied and fundamental research and 
provides the opportunity for training at the School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, 
North Carolina. 

Fundamental areas of paiticular interest are biochemistry and toxicology, physi- 
ology and behavior, and taxonomy. The program in biochemistry and toxicology is 
interdepartmental involving faculty from the departments of Biochemistiy, Crop 
Science, Entomology, Statistics and Genetics. Taxonomy is particularly strong in 
the aphids, leafhoppers, mites and mosquitoes. Invertebrate pathology emphasizes 
protozoan diseases. Ecology, population dynamics, behavior and nutrition are em- 
phasized in several programs. 

The departmental research and training programs are supported by a complex of 
modern facilities including: a pesticide residue analysis laboratory, pesticide 
research laboratory, comparative biochemistry and toxicology laboratories, a 
behavior laboratory, insect rearing rooms, greenhouses and field stations. An adja- 
cent phytotron or bioclimatic facility provides an opportunity for ecological and 
behavioral studies under controlled conditions. Ultrastructural investigations are 
conducted in the Institute of Biological Sciences Electron Microscope Facility. Ex- 
tensive nuclear reactor and computer facilities and statistical sei-vices are available 
on campus. 

See page 24 for an account of the Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory and 
page 26 for the Insect Pest Management Program. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 401 (ZO 401) Bibliographic Research in Biology. 1(1-0) F. 

ENT 410 (BS 410) Biology of Insects. Prerequisite: ZO 201. 3(2-2) F. 



148 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ENT 502 Insect Diversity. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of biology. 4(2-4) F. An 
introduction to the external morphology of insects and a survey of the biology and 
identification of immature and adult insects. Evolutionary relationships of insects 
and other arthropods, speciation, nomenclature, and classical and recent approaches 
to systematics are also considered. Baker, Neunzig, Young 

ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects. Prerequisites: Twelve hours in biology, 
nine hours in chemistry, three hours of biochemistry, ENT 301 or equivalent. 4(2-6) 
S. Structure and morphological variations of organ systems in insects including con- 
siderations of their histology and function. Sensory and general physiology will then 
lead into basic elements of insect orientation and behavior. 

Campbell, Hodgson, Yamamoto 

ENT 504 Insect Morphology. Prerequisite: ENT 502. 3(1-4) F. Concerned with ex- 
ternal morphology, primary and comparative phases, with emphasis on knowledge 
and techniques which can be applied to specific problems. (Offered fall 1975 and 
alternate years.) Young 

ENT 511 Systematic Entomology. Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 or equiva- 
lent. 3(1-4) F. A somewhat detailed survey of the orders and families of insects, de- 
signed to acquaint the student with those groups and develop in the student some 
ability in the use of the taxonomic literature. (Offered fall 1974 and alternate years.) 

Young 

ENT 520 Insect Pathology. Prerequisite: Introductory entomology and introduc- 
tory microbiology. 3(2-3) S. A treatment of the noninfectious and infectious diseases 
of insects, the etiological agents and infectious processes involved, immunological 
responses, and applications. (Offered spring 1975 and alternate years.) Brooks 

ENT 531 Insect Ecology. Prerequisite: ENT 502. 3(2-2) F. The environmental re- 
lations of insects, including insect development, habits, distribution and abundance. 
(Offered fall 1975 and alternate years.) Rabb 

ENT 541 Immature Insects. Prerequisite: ENT 502 or equivalent. 2(1-3) F. An ad- 
vance study of the immature stages of selected orders of insects with emphasis on 
generic and specific taxa. Primary consideration is given to the larval stage, but a 
brief treatment of eggs and pupae is also included. (Offered fall 1974 and alternate 
years.) Neunzig 

ENT 542 Acarology. Prerequisite: ENT 301 or ENT 312 or ZO 201. 3(2-3) S. A 
systematic survey of the mites and ticks with emphasis on identification, biology 
and control of the more common and economic forms attacking material, plants and 
animals including man. (Offered spring 1975 and alternate years.) Farrier 

ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Control. Prerequisites: ENT 312 or ENT 301. 3 
(2-2) F. The course is divided into two phases. The first deals with the basic causes 
of insect problems, an evaluation of the biological and economic aspects of insect 
attack and the fundamental methods employed in insect control. The second part 
deals with the critical chemical, physical and biological properties of compounds 
used for insect control. The material presented in the course is directed toward ob- 
taining fundamental knowledge of the scientific principles underlying modern 
methods of protection of food, clothing, shelter and health from arthropods. 

Guthrie 

ENT 562 Agricultural Entomology. Prerequisites: ENT 301 or ENT 312. 3(2-3) S. 
A study of the taxonomy, biology, and ecology of beneficial and injurious insects and 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 149 

arachnids of agricultural crops. Advantages and limitations of the advanced con- 
cepts for controlling insect and mite populations on different crops will be empha- 
sized. (Offered spring 1975 and alternate years.) Bradley, Rock 

ENT 575 (PHY) 575, ZO 575) Physiology of Invertebrates. 3(3-0) F. (See physi- 
ology, page 220.) 

ENT 582 (ZO 582) Medical and Veterinary Entomology. Prerequisites: ENT 301 
or ENT 312 and ZO 315 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. A study of the morphology, taxon- 
omy, biology and control of the arthropod parasites and disease vectors of man and 
animals. The ecology and behavior of vectors in relation to disease transmission and 
control will be emphasized. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) Axtell 

ENT 590 Special Problems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credits Arranged 
F,S. Original research on special problems in entomology not related to a thesis 
problem, but designed to provide experience and training in research. 

Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENT 602 Principles of Taxonomy. Prerequisite: ENT 511. 3(1-4) S. A course 
introducing the methods and tools used in animal taxonomy, designed to promote a 
better understanding of taxonomic literature, and provide a foundation for taxono- 
mic research. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) Young 

ENT 611 Biochemistry of Insects. Prerequisite: BCH 551 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 
The biochemistry of insects will be considered with primary emphasis on interme- 
diate metabolism. Aspects in which insects show specialization will be treated in 
greater detail. The comparative treatment used necessitates some consideration of 
other animal groups. (Offered fall 1975 and alternate years.) Hodgson 

ENT 622 Insect Toxicology. Prerequisites: ENT 550, BCH 551 or equivalent. 3 
(2-3) S. The relation of chemical structure to insect toxicity, the mode of action of 
toxicants used to kill insects, the metabolism of insecticides in plant and animal sys- 
tems, the selectivity within the cholinesterase inhibitors and other selective mech- 
anisms and the analysis of insecticide residues will be discussed. (Offered spring 
1974 and alternate years.) Dauterman, Guthrie 

ENT 690 Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in entomology or closely 
allied fields. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of entomological topics selected and assigned 
by seminar chairman. Graduate Staff 

ENT 699 Research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credits Arranged F,S. Orig- 
inal research in connection with thesis problem in entomology. Graduate Staff 



Fiber and Polymer Science 

ASSOCIATED GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: J. F. Bogdan, K. S. Campbell, D. M. Gates, D. W. Chaney, R. D. 
Gilbert, G. Goldfinger, D. S. Hamby, S. P. Hersh, P. R. Lord, H. A. 
Rutherford, V. T. Stannett, C. F. Zorowski; Adjunct Professors: H. F. 
Mark, A. M. Sookne; Associate Professors: J. A. CycuLO, A. H. M. El- 



150 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Shiekh, T. W. George, T. H. Guion, B. S. Gupta, R. McGregor, T. G. 
RocHOvv, M. H. Theil, W. K. Walsh; Research Associate: C. E. Bryan; 
Assistant Professors: P. Brown, R. E. Fornes 

Fiber and Polymer Science is a multidisciplinary program bringing together the 
disciplines of mathematics, chemistry and physics and the application of engineer- 
ing principles for the development of independent scholars versed in the field of 
fiber materials science. The program is administered by the School of Textiles and 
leads to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Students majoring in the physical sci- 
ences, mathematics, textiles or engineering and having at least a "B" grade in their 
undergraduate major will normally qualify for admission. 

Fiber and Polymer Science is concerned with polymeric materials, fibers pro- 
duced from them, and fiber assemblies in one, two and three dimensional forms. 
This broad field of study permits a wide range of specializations. The candidate is 
expected to penetrate deeply into one area of specialization and to acquire a rea- 
sonable perspective in other relevant subject matter. Generally these specialities 
occur within the areas of polymer chemistry and synthesis; fiber and polymer phy- 
sics and physical chemistry; or textile mechanics and technology. 

The student's research is based upon a chosen area of specialization and consti- 
tutes his contribution of new knowledge to society. 

Ample laboratory space is available and there are a number of specialized labor- 
atories equipped to support doctoral investigations. Other facilities and research 
equipment are available in cooperating departments on campus which may be used 
in fiber and polymer science research programs. The Burlington Textiles Library 
houses one of the most complete collections of polymer, fiber and textile literature. 



DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

Doctor of Philosophy— An advisory committee chaired by a member of the fiber 
and polymer science faculty is formed as soon as possible in order to develop with 
the student a plan of study designed to enable him to acquire the comprehensive 
knowledge required to pass the qualifying cumulative examinations. 

There are no definite requirements in credit hours for the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. A student's program of study is designed around the student's special inter- 
ests, while maintaining the coherence and breadth essential for professional devel- 
opment and excellence in research. 

Doctor of Philosophy Minor — Ph.D. candidates who designate a named minor in 
Fiber and Polymer Science will be required to pass the common part of the cumu- 
lative examination. 

Communications concerning this program should be directed to the Chairman of 
the Graduate Studies Committee, School of Textiles, North Carolina State Univer- 
sity. 

COURSE OFFERINGS" 

(See departmental listing for descriptions.) 

• Extensive use may be made of g^raduate course offerings in other Schools on campus when develop- 
ing the minor field. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 161 



GENERAL COURSES 



TC 


561 


TC 


671 


Polymer I 


TC 


505 


TC 


662 


T 


500 


TX 


560 


TX 


691 


T 


501 


CHE 


569 


CHE 


669 



TC 461 (CH 461) Chemistry of Fibers. 

TC 504 Fiber Formation — Theory and Practice. 

TC 562 (CH 562) Physical Chemistry of High Polymers — Bulk Properties. 

TX 465 Mechanics of Yarn Formation. 

TX 561 Mechanical and Rheological Properties of Fibrous Material. 



COURSES IN AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION 

Polymer Chemistry and Synthesis 

Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. 
(CHE 671) Special Topics in Polymer Science. 

Polymer Physics and Physical Chemistry 

Theory of Dyeing. 

Physical Chemistry of High Polymers — Solution Properties. 

Advanced Microscopy. 

Structural and Physical Properties of Fibers. 
(TC 691) Special Topics in Fiber Science. 

Resinography. 

(TC 569) Polymers, Surfactants, and Colloidal Materials. 
(TC 669) Diffusion in Polymers. 



Food Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. M. Roberts, Head 

Professors: I. W. Aurand, T. N. Blxjmer, H.B. Craig, M. W. Hoover, M. L. 
Speck — Graduate Administrator, H. E. Swaisgood, F. G. Warren; Extension 
Professors: Eloise S. Gofer, F. B. Thomas; Professors USDA: T. A. Bell, 
J. L. Etchells, a. E. Purcell; Professor Emeritus: I. D. Jones; Associate 
Professors: D. E. Carroll Jr., S. E. Gilliland, D. D. Hamann, A. P. Han- 
sen, V. A. Jones, N. B. Webb; Extension Associate Professor: F. R. Tarver 
Jr.; Associate Professors USDA: H. P. Fleming, W. M. Walter Jr.; Assistant 
Professors: D. M. Adams Jr., H. R. Ball Jr., G. G. Giddings, B. R. Johnson; 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: W. Y. Cobb; Visiting Assistant Professor: B. Ray 

Programs of study leading to the Master of Agriculture, Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered by the Department of Food Science. 

Areas of study and research include food chemistry, food microbiology, food 
engineering, and food process and product development. These areas involve all 
foods including dairy products, fruits, meats, poultry products, seafoods, nutmeats 
and vegetables. Supporting course work and cooperative research are offered in 
areas such as biochemistry, chemistry, economics, engineering, genetics, micro- 
biology, nutrition, physics and statistics. 



152 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The department participates in interdepartmental graduate student training pro- 
griims. One is the triiining program in Industrial Waste Control and Abatement 
with the Department of Civil Engineering. Specialization in industrial water use, 
water supply and pollution control is stressed in water resources graduate pro- 
grams. Particular emphasis is given to the processes used in food plant operations. 
The Marine Sciences Program provides research training in the technology of sea- 
food processing and product development. The School of Public Health, University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, offers courses for a minor or for enriching Food 
Science programs with studies in environmental sciences. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FS 400 Foods and Nutrition. Prerequisite: CH 220. 3(3-0) S. 

FS 402 Food Chemistry. Prerequisite: CH 220 or CH 221. 3(3-0) F. 

FS 404 (PO 404) Poultry Products. Prerequisites: CH 220 or CH 221. 3(2-3) F. 

FS 405 (MB 405) Food Microbiology. Prerequisite: MB 301 or MB 401. 3(2-3) F. 

FS 409 (ANS 409) Meat and Meat Products. Prerequisite: CH 220. 3(2-3) S. 

FS 432 (BAE 432) Food Engineering II. Prerequisite: FS 331 (BAE 331). 3(2-3) 
S. 

FS 490 Food Science Seminar. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 1(1-0) S. 

FS 491 Special Topics in Food Science. Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent 
of instructor. Maximum 6 F,S. 

FOR GR.\DUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FS 503 Food Analysis. Prerequisites: CH 315, BCH 351, FS 402. 3(1-6) S. A study 
of the principles, methods and techniques necessary for quantitative physical and 
chemical analyses of food and food products. Results of analysis evaluated in terms 
of quality standards and governing regulations. Johnson 

FS 504 Advanced Food Chemistry. Prerequisite: BCH 551. 3(3-0) F. Studies on 
the molecular properties of food components, their interactions and reactions and 
the physiochemical alterations occuring in the maturation, harvest, process and 
storage stages. Aurand 

FS 506 (MB 506) Advanced Food Microbiology. Prerequisite: FS 405 (MB 405) 
or equivalent. 3(1-6) S. The interactions of microorganisms in foods and their roles 
in food spoilage and bioprocessing. Cellular and molecular relationships in bacterial 
injury, repair and aging resulting from environmental stresses. Bacterial sporula- 
tion, germination and physiological properties of bacterial spores. Speck 

FS 511 Food Research and Development. Prerequisites: FS 331 (BAE 331), FS 
402, FS 405 (MB 405). 3(2-3) S. A study of the scientific principles underlying the 
development of new and improved food products and processes. The study of specific 
food industry problems by the case method. Special emphasis on the application of 
research and development principles to meat, poultry and fisheries industries. 

Webb 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 153 

FS 516 Quality Control of Food Products. Prerequisites: FS 331 (BAE 331), FS 
402, FS 405 (MB 405). 3(2-3) S. A study of quality control fundamentals in the food 
industry including specifications and standards, testing procedures, sampling, sta- 
tistical and quality control, and organization. Food products and industry problems 
with special emphasis on dairy products. Hansen 

FS 521 (HS 521) Food Preservation. Prerequisites: MB 401 or FS 405 (MB 405), 
FS 402, or BO 421. 3(2-3) F. An examination of principles and methods employed in 
the preservation of foods. Major emphasis on thermal, freezing, drying and fermen- 
tation processes and their relationship to physical, chemical and organoleptic 
changes in product. The relationship of these preservation techniques to the devel- 
opment of an overall processing operation. Carroll 

FS 562 (HS 562) Post-Harvest Physiology. 3(3-0) S. (See horticultural science, 
page 169.) 

FS 591 Special Problems in Food Science. Prerequisite: Graduate or senior stand- 
ing. Maximvmi 6 F,S. Analysis of scientific, engineering and economic problems of 
current interest in foods. The problems are designed to provide training and exper- 
ience in research. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FS 601 Theory of Physical Measurements of Biopolymers. Prerequisite: CH 525 
or BCH 551. 3(2-3) S. The theory and interpretation of various physical parameters 
of polymers and the theoretical basis for the measurement of the parameter and its 
limitations. Particular emphasis on the experimental design and interpretation of 
data yielding maximum information. Swaisgood 

FS 690 Seminar in Food Science. 1(1-0) F,S. Preparation and presentation of sci- 
entific papers, progress reports and research and special topics of interest in foods. 

Graduate Staff 

FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science. Credits Arranged. Directed 
research in a specialized phase of food science designed to provide experience in re- 
search methodology and philosophy. Graduate Staff 

FS 699 Research in Food Science. Credits Arranged. Original research prepara- 
tory to the thesis for the Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

Graduate Staff 



Forestry 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. B. Davey, Head 

Professors: F. S. Barkalow, A. W. Cooper (on leave), E. B. Cowling, J. W. 
DuFFiELD, M. H. Farrier, J. W. Hardin, J. O. Lammi, T. E. Maki, T. O. 
Perry, L. C. Saylor, R. R. Wilkinson, B. J. Zobel; Professor USDA: C. S. 
Hodges; Professor USPS: G. Namkoong; Professors Emeriti: W. D. Miller, 
R. J. Preston; Adjunct Professors: G. H. Hepting, N. E. Johnson, L. J. Metz, 
C. G. Wells; Associate Professors: L. F. Grand, W. L. Hafley, D. H. J. 



154 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Steensen; Associate Professor USPS: B. F. Swindel; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: J. W. Koenigs, E. G. Kuhlman; Assistant Professors: D. L. 
Holley, R. C. Kellison 

ASSOCIATE MEMBER OF THE DEPARTMENT: 

Professor (USD A): D. E. Moreland 

The Department of Forestry offers graduate work leading to the degrees of Mas- 
ter of Forestry, Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 

The professional degree, Master of Forestry, is designed for students interested 
in the advanced applications of the principles of one of the fields in forestry. The 
course program emphasizes professional specialization; a thesis is not required. 

The Master of Science degree requires the student to become broadly educated 
in the scholarly disciplines in the field of forestry. Independent research and a the- 
sis are required for this degree. 

Students with a bachelor's degree in forestry may complete either of the master's 
programs in two academic years or less, provided they have met the undergraduate 
curriculum requirements in mathematics and the biological, physical and social 
sciences. Candidates who do not hold an undergraduate degree in forestry usually 
are required to extend their program an extra semester. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is available to students who demonstrate high 
intellectual capacity and the ability to conduct original research and scholarly work 
at the highest levels. 

Joint and associate faculty appointments with other departments provide excep- 
tional opportunities for graduate studies in the forestry-related aspects of biometry, 
botany, ecology, economics, entomology, genetics, hydrology, plant pathology, soil 
science and wildlife science. Students who are concerned with the problems of re- 
storing and improving the quality of our environment may find meaningful gradu- 
uate study in the Department of Forestry. 

The department is housed in the modern facilities of Biltmore Hall. Facilities for 
forest biological research include a phytotron, greenhouses, a small experimental 
nursery and an off-campus laboratory equipped for the study of ctirbon and water 
metabolism of tree seedlings. The experimental and production forests of the school 
total more than 80,000 acres. The Hofinann Forest on the coastal plain, the Good- 
win Forest at the edge of the sandhills, and the Schenck, Hope Valley and Hill for- 
ests in the Piedmont provide a variety of forest types and problems in the manage- 
ment of timber, water, wildlife and recreational resources. The Hill and Schenck 
forests include natural areas, excluded from normal management operations, for the 
study of forest ecology. 

The department has exceptionally close working relations, including three coop- 
erative programs of research and development, with public agencies and the forest 
industries of the southeastern United States. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 405 Forest Land Management. Prerequisites: FOR 272, FOR 452. 5(2-6-2) F. 

FOR 406 Forest Land Inventory and Planning. Prerequisite: FOR 405. 6(2-12) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 155 

FOR 423 (WPS 423) Logging and Milling. 3(2-3) F. (See wood and paper science, 

page 274.) 

FOR 435 (WPS 435) Systems Analysis in Forest Products. 3(3-0) S. (See wood 
and paper science, page 274.) 

FOR 452 Silvics. Prerequisite: BO 200, CH 103, PY 221 or PY 212, mathematics 
through calculus. 4(3-2) S. 

FOR 462 Artificial Forestation. 2(1-2) S. 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management. Prerequisites: A basic course in biol- 
ogy and economics; junior or senior standing. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR 491 (WPS 491) Senior Problems in Forest Resources. Prerequisite: Consent 
of department. Credits Arranged. 

FOR 492 (WPS 492) Senior Problems in Forest Resources. Prerequisite: Consent 
of department. Credits Arranged. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FOR 501 Forest Influences and Watershed Management. Prerequisite: Advanced 
undergraduate or graduate standing, 3(3-0) F. Study of the effects of woody vegeta- 
tion on climate, water, and soil, with applications of the knowledge of forest influ- 
ences to management of forest land resources, including conservation and yield of 
water, stabilization of streamflow and soils, reduction of sedimentation and general 
improvement of the environment. Maki 

FOR 512 Forest Economics. Prerequisite: Basic course in economics. 3(3-0) S. 
Economics and social value of forests; supply of, and demands for forest products; 
land use; forestry as a private and a public enterprise; economics of the forest ind- 
dustries. Holley 

FOR 571 Advanced Forest Mensuration. Prerequisites: FOR 272, ST 311. 3(2-2) S. 
Study of the development of mathematical models to describe forest resources phe- 
nomena; criteria for evaluating the "goodness" of such models; and methods of data 
collection for use in the elevation. Hafley 

FOR 572 Conservation Policy Issues. Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate or 
graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. Analysis of the attitudes of selected private groups and 
public agencies toward multiple resource development. Special attention given to 
forest resource policies, timber management objectives, private industry activity, 
recreation and multiple use, education, research, watersheds, governmental activity, 
interaction in international forestry affairs and the role of professional foresters in 
multiple use resource management. Lammi 

FOR 591 Forestry Problems. Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate or graduate 
standing. Credits Arranged. Assigned or selected problems in the field of silvicul- 
ture, harvesting operations, lumber manufacturing, wood science, pulp and paper 
science, wood chemistry or forest management. Staff 

FOR 599 Methods of Research in Forestry. Prerequisite: Advanced undergrad- 
uate or graduate standing. Credits Arranged. Research procedures, problem analy- 
sis, working plan preparation, interpretation and presentation of results; evaluation 
of selected studies by forest research organizations; techniques and constraints in 
the use of sample plots. Staff 



166 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

FOR 611 (GN 611) Forest Genetics. Prerequisites: GN 411 and permission of 
instructor. 3(3-0) S. Application of genetic principles to silviculture, management 
and wood utilization. Emphasis is on variation in wild populations, the bases for 
selection of desirable qualities, and fundamentals of controlled breeding. 

Saylor, Zobel 

FOR 612 (GN 612) Advanced Topics in Quantitative Genetics. Prerequisites: GN 
611 (FOR 611), GN 626 (ST 626) or GN 603 (ANS 603) or consent of instructor. 
3(3-0) F. Advanced topics in statistics and population genetics pertinent to current 
research problems in genetics with special applications to forestry. Basic statistical 
and genetic theory is reviewed as bases for intensive study of selection theory and 
experimental and mating design evaluation. The genetics of natural populations are 
studied for evolutionary interest as well as for their implications to breeding theory. 

Namkoong 

FOR 613 Special Topics in Silviculture. Prerequisite: One course in silviculture or 
consent of instructor. 3(2-1) F. Critical examination of selected topics, with special 
emphasis on concepts and phenomena which distinguish forests from other biotic 
communities and silviculture from other fields of applied biology. Duffield 

FOR 614 Advanced Topics in Forest Land Management. Prerequisite: FOR 405 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. A collation of the disciplines in silvics, forest growth estima- 
tion, growing stock regulation, forest soil management and site quality evaluation, 
forest influences, and silviculture, with emphasis on the interrelationships of these 
disciplines in the management of forest land resources and the applications to forest 
management systems. Maki 

FOR 691 (WPS 691) Graduate Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1(1-0) 
F,S. Presentation and discussion of progress reports on research, special problems 
and outstanding publications in forestry and related fields. Graduate Staff 

FOR 692 Advanced Forest Management Problems. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ng. Credits Arranged. Directed studies in forest management. Graduate Staff 

FOR 699 Problems and Research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credits 
Arranged. Specific forestry problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 

Graduate Staff 



Genetics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. J. Mann, Head 

Professors: D. S. Grosch, W. D. Hanson, C. S. Levings III, D. F. Matzinger, L. 
E. Mettler, R. H. Moll, T. Mukai, B. W. Smith, S. G. Stephens, A. C. 
Triantaphyllou; Professor Emeritus: C. H. Bostian; Professor USPS: G. 
Namkoong; Adjunct Professor: H. V. Malling; Associate Professors: L. G. 
BuRK (USDA), W. E. Kloos, H. E. Schaffer, C. W. Stuber (USDA); 
Assistant Professors: F. M. Johnson, W. H. McKenzie 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 157 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS 



Professors: J. L. Apple, F. B. Armstrong, F. D. Cochran, C. C. Cockerham, J. 
W. DuFFiELD, D. A. Emery, G. J. Galletta, D. U. Gerstel, E. W. 
Glazener, W. C. Gregory, P. H. Harvey, F. L. Haynes Jr., 
T. T. Hebert, J. E. Legates, B. T. McDaniel, P. A. Miller, T. O. Perry, 
L. L. Phillips, N. T. Powell, J. O. Rawlings, L. C. Saylor, D. H. Timothy, 
E. A. Wernsman, B. J. Zobel; USDA Professors: C. A. Brim, J. F. Chaplin, 
W. A. Cope, J. A. Lee, D. L. Thompson; Associate Professors: E. U. Dillard, 
E. J. Eisen, M. M. Goodman, C. F. Murphy, O. W. Robison; USDA Asso- 
ciate Professors: G. R. Gwynn; Associate Professor Emeritus: W. L. Blow; 
Assistant Professors: D. M. Briggs; USDA Assistant Professor: C. Tester; 
Visiting Assistant Professor: P. M. Burrows 

Graduate study under the direction of the genetics faculty may enable the stu- 
dent to qualify for the Master of Science or the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. A 
candidate for the Master's degree must acquire a thorough understanding of gene- 
tics and its relation to other biological disciplines and must present a thesis based 
upon his own research. In addition to a comprehensive knowledge of the field, a 
candidate for the doctorate must demonstrate capacity for independent investiga- 
tion and scholarship in genetics. 

At North Carolina State University there are no sharp divisions along depart- 
mental lines or between theoretical and applied aspects of genetics research. The 
members and associate members of the genetics faculty are located in six diflferent 
departments of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the School of Forest 
Resources and the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. They are study- 
ing a wide range of genetic problems and are utilizing not only the "classic" labora- 
tory material (arabidopsis, rumex, bacteria, Drosophila, Habrobracon, and mice) 
but also farm animals and agricultural and forest plants of the region. A student 
has, therefore, a wide choice of research problems in any of the following fields: 
cytology and cytogenetics, microbial and biochemical genetics, physiological and 
developmental genetics, evolution and speciation, quantitative and population 
genetics, and the application of genetics to breeding methodology. 

The ofiices and laboratories of the department are located in Gardner HaU with 
greenhouse facilities adjacent to the building. A genetics garden for use in the in- 
tensive research with plants and teaching functions is located three miles from the 
departmental oflBces. The departmental staff and the associate faculty members in 
animal science, biochemistry, crop science, horticultural science, poultry science, 
plant pathology, experimental statistics and the School of Forest Resources are for- 
tunate in being able to draw upon the extensive facilities of the North Carolina 
Agricultural Experiment Station. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics. Prerequisite: BS 100 (Junior standing). 3(3-0) 
F,S. 



158 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory. Prerequisite or corequisite: GN 411. 1 
(0-2) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 504 Human Genetics. Prerequisites: GN 301 or GN 411, or the equivalent. 3 
(3-0) S. Basic principles and methods of research in human genetics will be pre- 
sented. Current knowledge and important areas of research will be studied. This 
course is intended to serve the needs of advanced undergraduates and graduates in 
the social and biological sciences. Bostian, McKenzie, Schaffer 

GN 505 Genetics L Prerequisite: GN 411 or its equivalent. 4(3-2) F. Part I of a 
course sequence designed to serve as a foundation for graduate programs in gene- 
tics. As such, a balanced and comprehensive survey of each of the major fields of 
genetics must be presented in integrated form. Concepts based upon family analysis 
and a study of individual organisms will be presented here. Coverage will include 
general plant and animal genetics, biochemical and microbial genetics and physio- 
logfical and developmental genetics. Grosch, Kloos 

GN 506 Genetics IL Prerequisite: GN 505 or consent of instructor. 4(3-2) S. This 
course represents the second portion of a two-semester sequence in "General Gene- 
tics", which is presented at the intermediate level and directed primarily to begin- 
ning graduate students. Emphasis is placed on the basic principles and modem con- 
cepts of cytogenetics, population genetics, and quantitative genetics. These subjects 
each represent about one-third of the course and are integrrated with those of the 
first semester course as much as possible, with the primary synthesis being directed 
toward the dynamic aspects of evolutionary theory, including both intra- and inter- 
populational phenomena. Mettler, Graduate Staff 

GN 508 (ANS 508) Genetics of Animal Improvement. 3(3-0) S. (See animal sci- 
ence, page 69.) 

GN 513 Cytogenetics. Prerequisite: GN 506, or consent of instructor. 4(3-2) F. 
Classical and contemporary problems of chromosome structure, behavior and trans- 
mission. Euchromatin and heterochromatin. Recombination. Structural and numerical 
aberrations of chromosomes and the effects upon breeding systems of plants and 
animals. Interspecific hybridization. Polyploidy. Lectures and Laboratory. 

Galletta, Gerstel 

GN 520 (PO 520) Poultry Breeding. 3(2-2) F. (See poultry science, page 232.) 

GN 532 (ZO 532) Biological Effects of Radiations. Prerequisite: BS 100, or GN 
301, or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. Qualitative and quantitative effects of radia- 
tions (other than the visible spectrum) on biological systems, to include both mor- 
phological and physiological aspects in a consideration of genetics, cytology, histol- 
ogy, and morphogenesis. Grosch 

GN 540 (ZO 540) Evolution. Prerequisite: GN 411; undergraduates need consent 
of instructor. 3(3-0) F. The facts and theories of evolution in plants and animals. 
The causes and consequences of organic diversity. Smith 

GN 541 (CS 541, HS 541) Plant Breeding Methods. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science, 
page 104.) 

GN 542 (CS 542, HS 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures. 2(0-4) Sum. (See crop 
science, page 104.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 159 

GN 545 (CS 545) Origin and Evolution of Cultivated Plants. 2(2-0) S. (See crop 
science, page 104.) 

GN 550 (ZO 550) Experimental Evolution. Prerequisite: GN 506, or consent of 
instructor. 3(3-0) F. A survey of studies on experimental and natural populations of 
plants, animals, and man in relation to the theoretical aspects of evolution and 
speciation; a descriptive rather than rigorous mathematical review. (Offered 1975- 
76 and alternate years.) Mettler 

GN 561 (BCH 561, MB 561) Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. Prerequisites: 
BCH 351 or BCH 551, GN 411 or GN 505, MB 401 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. The course 
will include the development of the fields of biochemical and microbial genetics and 
will emphasize both the techniques and concepts utilized in current research. 

Armstrong 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

GN 603 (ANS 603) Population Genetics in Animal Improvement. 3(3-0) F. (See 
animal science, page 70.) 

GN 611 (FOR 611) Forest Genetics. 3(3-0) S. (See forestry, page 156.) 

GN 612 (FOR 612) Advanced Topics in Quantitative Genetics. 3(3-0) F. (See 
forestry, page 156.) 

GN 613 (CS 613, HS 613) Plant Breeding Theory. 3(3-0) S. (See crop science, 
page 104.) 

GN 626 (ST 626) Statistical Concepts in Genetics. 3(3-0) S. (See statistics, page 

257.) 

GN 631 Mathematical Genetics. Prerequisites: GN 506, ST 511, or consent of 
instructor. 3(3-0) F. Mathematical models of genetic systems, including probabilistic 
and deterministic formulations. Theory of survival of mutations, genetic linkage and 
dynamics of populations. (Offered in 1974-75 and alternate years.) Schaffer 

GN 633 Physiological Genetics. Prerequisite: GN 505 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 
Recent advances in physiological genetics. Attention will be directed to literature 
on the nature and action of genes, and to the interaction of heredity and environ- 
ment in the expression of the characteristics of higher organisms. Grosch 

GN 641 Colloquium in Genetics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; consent of 
instructor. 2(2-0) F,S. Informal group discussion of prepared topics assigned by the 
instructor. Graduate Staff 

GN 691 Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1(1-0) F,S. 

GN 695 Special Problems in Genetics. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing, 
consent of instructor. 1-3 F,S. Special topics designed for additional experience and 
research training. Graduate Staff 

GN 699 Research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, permission of adviser. Credits 
Arranged. Original research related to the student's thesis problem. A maximum 
of six credits for the master's degree; by arrangement for the doctorate 

Graduate Staff 



160 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Geology 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see Geosciences, 
immediately following, page 162.) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GY 400 Environmental Geology. Prerequisites: GY 120 and senior standing. 
3(2-1) F. 

GY 415 Mineral Exploration and Evaluation. Prerequisites: GY 440, GY 452. 
3(2-3) S. 

GY 440 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology. Prerequisite: GY 331. 4(3-3) F. 

GY 452 Sedimentary Petrology. Prerequisite: GY 331. 4(3-3) S. 

GY 461 Engineering Geology. Prerequisite: GY 120. 3(3-0) F. 

GY 462 Geological Surveying. Prerequisite: GY 120. 3(1-5) S. 

GY 465 Geological Field Procedures. Prerequisites: GY 351, GY 440, GY 462. 
6 Sum. 

G Y 491, 492 Seminar on Selected Geologic Topics. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

GY 500 Regional Gedogy of North America. Prerequisites: GY 101 or 120, and 
senior standing. 1-6. The study, in the field, of classic geologic localities and geo- 
morphic processes not indigenous to North Carolina. Typical areas for the field 
trip are New England and adjacent Canada, northern Mexico and southwestern 
United States, and the Pacific Northwest. Representative subjects include the 
Canadian Shield, Precambrian mineral deposits, the San Andreas fault, desert 
geomorphology. Grand Canyon stratigraphy, modern and ancient reefs, and 
glaciated volcanoes. Mineral, rock, and fossil collecting. Student reports required. 

Graduate Staff 

GY 522 Petroleum Geology. Prerequisite: GY 452. 3(3-0) S. Properties, origin and 
modes of occurrence of petroleum and natural gas. Geologic and economic features 
of the principal oil and gas fields, mainly in the United States. (Offered 1975-76 
and alternate years.) Leith 

GY 524 Continental Evolution. Prerequisites: GY 222, GY 351, GY 440, GY 452. 
3(3-0) F. Study of the stratigraphic and tectonic events which have shaped the 
continents with emphasis upon North America; field trips. (Offered 1974-75 and 
alternate years.) Wei by 

GY 532 Ore Microscopy. Prerequisite: GY 331. 3(0-6) F. The theory and technique 
of microscopic investigation of opaque ore minerals, ores and mill products produced 
by beneficiation of ores. Studies of compositions and textures of materials in 
polished surfaces are based on observations of optical and physical properties, etch 
reactions and microchemical tests. (Offered 1975-76 and alternate years.) Brown 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 161 

GY 542 Microscopic Petrography. Prerequisite: GY 440. 3(1-4) S. Systematic 
study by microscopic techniques of the constitution and origin of consolidated rocks. 

Bartholomew 

GY 545 Advanced Igneous Petrology. Prerequisite: GY 440. 3(2-2) F. Study of 
physico-chemical principles related to igneous petrogenesis; consideration of general 
principles and specific problems including the origin, differentiation and emplace- 
ment of magmas and the possible relationships of igneous processes to global 
tectonics. (Offered 1975-76 and alternate years.) Spence 

GY 546 Advanced Metamorphic Petrology. Prerequisite: GY 440. 3(2-2) F. The 
petrogenesis of metamorphic rocks including factors of metamorphism, metamorphic 
facies concept, metamorphic facies series, contact metamorphism, regional dynamo- 
thermal metamorphism, burial metamorphism, ACF-AKF diagrams and feldspars 
of metamorphic rocks. (Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) Spence 

GY 552 Exploratory Geophysics. Prerequisites: GY 351, PY 208 or PY 212. 
3(3-0) S. Fundamental principles underlying all geophysical methods; procedure 
and instruments involved in gravitational, magnetic, seismic, electrical and other 
methods of studying geological structures and conditions. Spontaneous potential, 
resistivity, radioactivity, temperature and other geophysical logging methods. Study 
of applications and interpretations of results. (Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) 

Leith 

GY 563 Applied Sedimentary Analysis. Prerequisites: GY 452, ST 361. 3(2-2) F. 
Extension of GY 452, with emphasis on coarser grained detrital and chemical 
sedimentary rocks. Sampling of sedimentary population, critical study of as- 
sumptions underlying standard measurement techniques; treatment, testing and 
evaluation of sedimentary data; application to problems in sedimentology. (Offered 
1974-75 and alternate years.) Cavaroc 

GY 564 Sedimentary Environments of Deposition. Prerequisite: GY 452 or gradu- 
ate standing. 3(2-3) S. Fabric of large sedimentary basins in terms of the spatial 
distribution of component major rock facies; current litho-genetic models illustrating 
internal lithic relationships, variability and predictability; evolution of litho- 
genetic units; comparison with recent equivalents; field trips. Cavaroc 

GY 565 Hydrogeology. Prerequisite: GY 452. 3(3-0) S. Occurrence and sources of 
surface and subsurface water. Relationships of surface water to subsurface water. 
Rock properties affecting infiltration, movement, lateral and vertical distribution, 
and quality of ground water. Determination of permeability, capacity, specific yield 
and other hydraulic characteristics of aquifers. Principles of well design, legal 
aspects of water supplies. (Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) Welby 

GY 567 Geochemistry. Prerequisite: CH 331 or CH 433. 3(3-0) F. The quantitative 
distribution of elements in the earth's crust, the hydrosphere and the atmosphere. 
Application of the laws of chemical equilibrium and resultant chemical reactions 
to natural earth systems. Geochemical application of Eh-pH diagrams. Geochemical 
cycles. Isotope geochemistry. (Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) Brown 

GY 581 Geomorphology. Prerequisites: GY 120 plus appropriate background. 
3(2-3) F. The study of land forms and their relations to processes, stages of develop- 
ment, and adjustments to structure. Emphasis on mass-wasting, fluvial geo- 
morphology of humid and arid climates, coasts, karst, and eolian processes. Lectures, 
map interpretations, and field trips. Carson 



162 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

GY 582 Quaternary Geology. Prerequisites: GY 120, senior standing. 3(3-0) S. 
Glaciology, glacial geology, Pleistocene stratigraphy, periglacial geomorphology; 
Quaternary volcanism, tectonism, and sea-level fluctuations; late Cenozoic climate 
changes; field trips. (Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) Carson 

GY 583 Photogeology. Prerequisite: GY 120. 3(2-2) F. The stereoscopic study of 
aerial photographs to obtain geologic int'ormation. The construction of bedrock and 
surficial geologic maps from aerial photographs. Aspects of remote sensing useful 
in geologic interpretation. Carson 

GY 584 (MAS 584) Marine Geology. Prerequisites: GY 452 or GY 120 plus ap- 
propriate background. 3(3-0) S. Morphology, structure and origin of ocean basins 
with their diverse features and their relations to the continents. Physical and 
chemical properties of the oceans, sedimentation in the marine environment and 
near-shore features. The economic potential of mineral resources derived from 
oceanic areas. (Offered 1975-76 and alternate years.) Welby 

GY 593 Advanced Topics in Geology. Prerequisite: Consent of staff. 1-6 F,S. 
Special study of some advanced phases of geology. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

GY 611, 612 Advanced Economic Gedogy. Prerequisites: GY 440, GY 452. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Detailed study of the origin and occurrence of specific mineral deposits. 

Brown 

GY 630 Geotectonics. Prerequisites: GY 351, GY 440, GY 452. 3(3-0) F. Philoso- 
phical and historical development of major geologic concepts. Concepts include: 
orogeny and epeirogeny; oroclines and geosynclines; plate tectonics, ocean basin 
development, and continental drift; magmatic cycles in orogeny; expanding and con- 
tracting earth theories, and energy sources for earth deformation. (Offered 1975-76 
and alternate years.) Bartholomew 

GY 695 Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Scientific articles, 
progress reports and special problems of interest to geologists and geological and 
mining engineers discussed. Graduate Staff 

GY 699 Geological Research. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credits Ar- 
ranged. Lectures, reading assignments and reports; special work in geology to meet 
the needs and interests of the students. Thesis problem. Graduate Staff 



Geosciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. J. Leith, Head 

Professors: H. S. Brown, E. G. Droessler, W. J. Saucier; Professor Emeritus: 
J. M. Parker III; Associate Professors: N. E. Huang, W. H. Spence, A. H. 
Weber, C. W. Welby; Adjunct Associate Professor: J. R. Smith; Assistant 
Professors: M. J. Bartholomew, R. J. Carson III, V. V. Cavaroc Jr., C. E. 
Knowles, L. J. PiETRAFESA, G. F. Watson; Adjunct Assistant Professors: 
W. D. Bach, J. T. Peterson 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 163 

The Department of Geosciences oflFers graduate programs leading to the Master 
of Science degree in geology and, as its input into the interdepartmental graduate 
program in Marine Sciences, also offers graduate and advanced undergraduate 
courses in meteorology and physical oceanography. The Master of Science and 
Doctor of Philosophy degrees in geological, meteorological, and physical oceano- 
graphy are granted through the University Marine Sciences Program (page 178 ). 

Candidates for admission to the graduate program in geology should hold a 
bachelor's degree in geology or a satisfactory equivalent, preferably with a strong 
background in physics, chemistry and mathematics. For graduate study in mete- 
orological oceanography the required background includes chemistry, physics, 
mathematics, and basic knowledge of atmospheric physics and mechanics. For a 
graduate program in physical oceanography a bachelor's degree in one of the 
physical sciences or engineering with a strong background in physics and mathe- 
matics is required. In each of the three disciplines the master's degree program 
includes a minimum of 30 semester hours credit divided between major and minor 
fields, and a research thesis. The general requirements for a Ph.D. program in 
marine sciences are described on page 179. 

Facilities are available for research in mineralogy, petrology, hydrogeology, 
economic geology, engineering geology, meteorology, physical oceanography and 
geophysical fluid dynamics. Excellent collections of geoscience literature are avail- 
able in the University library and elsewhere in the Research Triangle area. Con- 
sultations with scientists of the federal and state agencies in Raleigh as well as 
with the staffs of the neighboring universities are encouraged. 

Financial aid is available through laboratory teaching assistantships and assis- 
tantships on faculty research projects. Government agencies and industrial concerns 
provide part-time employment from time to time. Small grants from the state some- 
times are available to help with thesis expenses. 



Guidance and Personnel Services 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see Guidance 
and Personnel Services under Education, page 117.) 



History 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor B. Wishy, Head 

Professor M.S. Downs, Assistant Head 

Professors: B. F. Beers, M. L. Brown Jr., R. W. Greenlaw, Doris E. King, 
S. Nobun; Associate Professors: R. N. Elliott, W. C. Harris, J. P. Hobbs, 
J. M. Riddle, S. Suval, Mary E. Wheeler; Adjunct Associate Professor: 
T. W. Mitchell; Assistant Professors: C. H. Carlton, C. W. Harper Jr., 
R. H. Sack, Edith Dudley Sylla 



164 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

The history department oflFers a program leading to the Master of Arts degree 
in history. Although no specific courses are stipulated for admission to the program, 
preference will be given to those students with at least 18 hours in history and a 
total of 30 hours in the social sciences. Candidates are expected to have taken the 
Aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination, or if admitted provisionally 
must do so before the end of their first semester. It is helpful if candidates will 
forward a brief statement of their objective in entering the program along with 
their application. 

Normally a degree candidate will concentrate work in either European or 
American history with the required total of 30 hours being made up of nine to 
twelve hours of course work at the 500 level or above; six hours of research 
seminar (600 level); up to six hours of research and preparation of thesis (600 
level); and six to nine hours of course work in a field related to the candidate's 
area of concentration (500 or 600 level). Under special circumstances a candidate 
may be permitted to include a 400-level course in one's program if it has particular 
relevance to one's program objectives. 

Candidates concentrating in American history have the advantage of the source 
materials available nearby at the State Department of History amd Archives. It 
should be noted that a candidate's degree program can include a two-semester 
sequence in the history and administration of archives, a field in which there is 
considerable demand for well-trained people at this time. For master's candidates 
interested in teaching in the public schools, the education and other courses 
required for the state certificate are available, but inclusion of these will in most 
cases extend the time needed for the degree to three or four semesters. 

Although no fellowships are offered at this time, some limited financial assistance 
is available. Inquiry should be addressed to the head of the department, 161 
Harrelson Hall. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NOTE: Prerequisite: (WO level) Three hours of history unless otherwise noted. 

HI 400 CivilizationoftheAncientNear East. 3(3-0) 

HI 403 Ancient Greek Civilization. 3(3-0) 

HI 404 Rometo 180 A.D. 3(3-0) 

HI 406 From Roman Empire to Middle Ages. 3(3-0) 

HI 410 Italian Renaissance. 3(3-0) 

HI 411 The Protestant and Catholic Reformation of the Sixteenth Century. 3(3-0) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 165 

HI 414 TheAgeof Absolutism. 3(3-0) 

HI 415 Revdutionary Europe. 3(3-0) 

HI 418 Fascism in Germany and Italy, 1919-1945. 3(3-0) 

HI 425 Tudor and Stuart England. 3(3-0) 

HI 428 E ngland in the Age of the American Revolution. 3(3-0) 

HI 429 Twentieth Century Britain. 3(3-0) 

HI 430 France Since the Revolution. 3(3-0) 

HI 432 Germany Since 1848. 3(3-0) 

HI 435 A Century of Nationalism: East-Central Europe, 1848-1948. 3(3-0) 

HI 438 History of Russia to 1881. 3(3-0) 

HI 439 History ofRussia Since 1881. 3(3-0) 

HI 442 United States: Revolution to Constitution. 3(3-0) 

HI 443 TheAgeof Jefferson. 3(3-0) 

HI 444 TheAgeof Jackson, 1815-1850. 3(3-0) 

HI 446 Civil War and Reconstruction. 3(3-0) 

HI 448 Populism and Progressivism. 3(3-0) 

HI 452 Recent America. 3(3-0) 

HI 454 U. S. Foreign Relations. 3(3-0) 

HI 458 Significant Figures in 20th Century America. 3(3-0) 

HI 461 Civilization oftheOld South. 3(3-0) 

HI 463 North Carolina to 1860. 3(3-0) 

HI 464 North Carolina Since 1860. 3(3-0) 

HI 467 Modern Mexico. 3(3-0) 

HI 469 Twentieth-Century Latin American Revolutions. 3(3-0) 

HI 471 Revolutionary China. 3(3-0) 

HI 472 Modern Japan, 1850 to Present. 3(3-0) 

HI 473 20thCentury Asian Revolutionaries. 3(3-0) 

HI 477 British Empire and Commonwealth. 3(3-0) 



166 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

HI 492 Seminar in History. Required of all history majors. Open to other seniors 
and graduate students with departmental permission. 3(3-0) F,S. Staff 

HI 498 Special Topics in History. 1-6 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NOTE: Prerequisite: (500 level) Six hours of advanced history or equivalent. 

HI 515 The High Middle Ages. 3(3-0) An analysis of various aspects of medieval 
culture. Selected topics such as the revival of the Roman Empire, monastic and 
papal reform, the rise of universities, the evolution of representative bodies, the 
Gothic style, troubadour and goliardic poetry, scholasticism, and the revival of 
Roman law will be examined using source readings. Research techniques will also 
be discussed. Riddle 

HI 530 Era of the French Revolution and Napoleon. 3(3-0) An examination of 
aspects of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era which are currently subject 
to differing interpretations. Greenlaw 

HI 532 History of Great Britain, 1820-1914. 3(3-0) A history of Great Britain 
from the Regency of George IV to the outbreak of World War I with special 
emphasis on studies in depth of the most significant developments in constitutional, 
religious, and economic ideas and institutions. Downs 

HI 536 History of International Relations Since 1870. 3(3-0) A study of Euro- 
pean diplomatic history and of the larger area of world international relations from 
the PYanco-Prussian war through both World Wars up to the present. Emphasis on 
policies and attempts to solve international problems. Brown 

HI 545 The American Civil War. 3(3-0) The course traces and analyzes events 
that led to the disruption of the union and provides an intensive study of the war, 
with emphasis upon its nonmilitary aspects. Only the major military campaigns are 
discussed. Harris 

HI 546 Reconstruction of the American Union. 3(3-0) This course is an in- 
depth study of the difficulties involved in the restoration and readjustment of 
American society after the Civil War. Special attention is given to social and eco- 
nomical conditions in the defeated South, military reconstruction and Republican 
ascendacy in the region. Harris 

HI 548 The American Response to Industrialism. 3(3-0) Focuses on the indus- 
trialization of the American economy and on efforts to deal with the ensuing trans- 
formation of American life through politics, social institutions and ideas. Noblin 

HI 551 History and Principles of the Administration of Archives and Manu- 
scripts. 3(3-0) F. A study of the nature, importance and use of original manuscript 
resources; the history and evolution of written records, and the institutions ad- 
ministering them. Mitchell 

HI 552 Application of Principles of Administration of Archives and Manuscripts. 

Prerequisite: HI 551. 3(3-0) S. Internship training in the application of the princi- 
ples and practices of archival management. Mitchell 

HI 561 U. S. Far Eastern Relations. 3(3-0) A study of American expansion into 
the Pacific and involvement in Asian affairs. Both official diplomatic relations and 
unofficial contacts (by missionaries, educators, businessmen, and the like) which 
influenced Americans, are examined. Beers 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 167 

HI 565 The History of Urban Life in the U.S., 1607-1865. 3(3-0) The history 
of urban life in the United States, 1607-1865. This course is designed primarily to 
give the student an understanding of the historical background of today's urban 
problems. King 

HI 566 The History of Urban Life in the U.S., 1865-Pre8ent. 3(3-0) The history 
of urban life in the United States, from 1865 to present. This course is designed 
primarily to give the student an understanding of the historical background of 
today's urban problems. King 

HI 572 History of Soviet Russia Since 1930. 3(3-0) Analysis of the domestic and 
foreign policies of the Soviet Union since 1930 with special emphasis on the position 
of the Soviet Union in the world since 1945. Wheeler 

HI 598 Special Topics in History. 1-6 F,S. An investigation of topics of particular 
interest to advanced students under the direction of faculty members on a tutorial 
basis. Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NOTE: Prerequisite: (600 level) Six hours of advanced history or equivalent. 

HI 601 Historiography and Historical Method. 3(3-0) F. A study of the major 
steps in the development of historical investigation and writing from classical times 
to the present, as well as an analysis of the elements of good historical research 
and writing with some discussion of methodology used by the contemporary scholarly 
historian. Graduate Staff 

HI 602 Seminar in American History. 3(3-0) S. A small research seminar on 
special topics in American history. Graduate Staff 

HI 604 Seminar in European History. 3(3-0) S. A small research seminar on 
special topics in European history. Graduate Staff 

HI 606 Seminar in Diplomatic History. 3(3-0) S. A small research seminar on 
topics in diplomatic history. Brown 

HI 699 Research in History. Credits Arranged, 1-6. Individual research under 
graduate thesis supervisor. Graduate Staff 



Horticultural Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor: , " Head 

Professors: W. E. Ballinger, F. D. Cochran, F. E. Correll, G. J. Galletta, 
F. L. Haynes Jr., R. A. Larson, C. H. Miller, P. V. Nelson; Research Pro- 
fessor: D. T. Pope; Extension Professors: ]. W. Love, W. A. Skroch; Pro- 
fessor (USDA): L. J. Kushman; Adjunct Professor: R. L. Sawyer; Associate 
Professors: T. F. Cannon, R. G. Halfacre, W. R. Henderson, T. R. Konsler, 
R. L. Low^ER, T. J. Monaco, W. B. Nesbitt, C. R. Unrath, D. C. Zeiger; 

* Head to be named. 



168 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Extension Associate Professor: C. M. Mainland; Assistant Professors: L. K. 
Hammett, D. M. Pharr; Extension Assistant Professor: D. C. Sanders 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: R. Aycock, R. J. Downs, R. H. Moll, T. J. Sheets, R. J. Volk 

Graduate study under the direction of the Horticultural Science faculty may 
lead to the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Areas of study 
include plant physiology, plant breeding and genetics, post-harvest physiology, 
plant nutrition, growth regulators, and weed science. The Master of Agriculture, a 
professional degree, can be earned by substituting additional course work for re- 
search requirements of graduate study. 

Facilities for graduate studies include a 41,400 square foot greenhouse (21 
sections, each with separately-controlled light and temperature); the Phytotron 
(available for controlled environment studies on horticultural crops); 18 well- 
equipped laboratories (seven analytical, one chromatography, one soil-testing, one 
seed handling and storage, three cytological/anatomical, one radioisotope, one 
tissue culture, one postharvest handling, and one landscape); 14 controlled- 
temperature storage rooms; an extensive collection of plant materials; and a variety 
of climates and soils from coast to mountains in North Carolina on 10 outlying 
research stations. 

Opportunities for employment after graduate study include teaching and re- 
search faculty positions in state and private universities; research and regulatory 
positions with the United States Department of Agriculture, both foreign and 
domestic; extension specialists and county agents; research, production and 
promotional work with agri-business, concerned with production of horticultural 
crops or services to horticultural industries. 

Graduate teaching and research assistantships (commercial, NDEA, Agricultural 
Foundation, or Experiment Station) for promising students are available. Students 
are encouraged to apply for assistantships at least six months prior to the anticipated 
enrollment date. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HS 411 Nursery Management. Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 414 Residential Landscaping. Prerequisites: SSC 200, HS 211, HS 212. 4(2-6) 
F. 

HS 421 Fruit Production. Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 432 Vegetable Production. Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 441 Floriculture I. Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) F. 

HS 442 Floriculture II. Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) S. 

HS 471 Arboriculture. Prerequisites: BS 100, SSC 200. 3(2-3) S. 

HS 491 Senior Seminar in Horticultural Science. Prerequisite: Consent of depart- 
ment. 1(1-0) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 169 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

HS 514 (CS 514) Principles and Methods in Weed Science. Prerequisite: CS 
414 or equivalent. 3(2-2) S. Studies on the losses caused by weeds, the ecology of 
weeds, biological control, basic concepts of weed management, herbicide-crop 
relationships and herbicide development. Introduction to greenhouse and bioassay 
techniques used in herbicide work and to field research techniques supplemented by 
laboratory and field exercises. Monaco 

HS 521 (FS 521) Food Preservation. 3(2-3) F. (See food science, page 153.) 

HS 541 (CS 541, GN 541) Plant Breeding Methods. 3(3-0) F. (See crop science, 
page 104.) 

HS 542 (CS 542, GN 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures. 2(0-4) Sum. (See 
crop science, page 104.) 

HS 552 Growth of Horticultural Plants. Prerequisite: BO 421. 3(2-3) F. Exercises 
in tissue culture principles and techniques as they relate to horticulture. Emphasis 
on endogenous controls of plant growth and the role of growth regulating compounds 
in horticultural research and production. Graduate Staff 

HS 562 (FS 562) Postharvest Physiology. Prerequisite: BO 421. 3(3-0) S. A study 
of chemical and physiological changes that occur during handling, transportation 
and storage which affect the quality of horticultural crops. Consideration will be 
given to preharvest and postharvest conditions which influence these changes. 

Graduate Staff 

HS 599 Research Principles. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credits Ar- 
ranged, Maximum 6. Investigation of a problem in horticulture under the direction 
of the instructor. The students obtain practice in experimental techniques and 
procedures, critical review of literature and scientific writing. The problem may 
last one or two semesters. Credits will be determined by the nature of the problem, 
not to exceed a total of three hours for any one problem. A written report and final 
oral exam required for completion of course. 

Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

HS 613 (CS 613, GN 613) Plant Breeding Theory. 3(3-0) S. (See crop science, 
page 104.) 

HS 614 (CS 614, SSC 614) Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. 3(3-0) F. 
(See crop science, page 105.) 

HS 621 Methods and Evaluation of Horticultural Research. Prerequisite: Gradu- 
ate standing. 3(3-0) F. Critical study and evaluation of technical writings and re- 
search presentation, research design and evaluation, photography, and basic 
electronics related to horticultural research. Graduate Staff 

HS 622 Mineral Nutrition in Plants. Prerequisites: BO 551, BO 552. 3(2-3) S. 
A comprehensive study of the functional roles of nutrients essential to plant growth, 
their interrelationships and their mode of influence on quality indices of horti- 
cultural crops. Considerations of the complexity of mineral nutrition experimenta- 
tion and evaluation of results. Recent developments in nutrient sources. A detailed 
look at the establishment and application of foliar analysis, foliar fertilization, and 
the nutrient uptake process in plants. (Offered 1974-75 and alternate years.) 

Nelson 



170 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



HS 691 Seminar. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Required of all horticultural 
science graduate students. 1(1-0) F,S. Presentation of scientific articles and special 
lectures. Students will be required to present one or more papers. Graduate Staff 

HS 699 Research. Prerequisites: Graduate standing in horticulture, consent of 
advisory committee chairman. Credits Arranged. A maximum of six credits is 
allowed toward the Master of Science degree; no limitation on credits in doctoral 
program. Original research on specific problems in fruit, vegetable and ornamental 
crops. Graduate Staff 



Industrial Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. A. Smith Jr., Head 

Professors: C. A. Anderson, J. R. Canada, R. G. Carson Jr., S. E. Elmaghraby, 
R. W. Llewellyn, R. G. Pearson; Associate Professors: R. E. Alvarez, 
R. H. Bernhard, J. J. Harder, A. M. Kamal, H. L. W. Nuttle, A. L. Prak, 
S. M. Souday; Assistant Prcfessors: G. E. Bennington, M. J. Magazine; 
Visiting Assistant Professor: M. A. Ayoub 

Industrial engineering is concerned with solutions to problems relating to design 
and control of organizational systems, such as industrial and commercial corpora- 
tions, government agencies, and other institutions which provide goods or services 
for public consumption. Interests include the management of operations, planning 
and scheduling, manufacturing engineering, allocation of resources, dynamic sys- 
tem design, man-machine relationships and occupational safety and health. 

The department oflFers the degrees of Master of Industrial Engineering, Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. The focal points of study are quantitative 
decision-making, human factors and work systems design. Typical minors are 
taken in statistics, economics, mathematics, psychology, and other engineering 
disciplines. 

The thesis work for the Master of Science degree may account for as many as 
six semester hours. No thesis is required for the MIE degree. A departmental 
brochure is available, which details the orientation and requirements for all de- 
grees. No foreign language is required at the master's level and a foreign language 
is optional with the student's advisory committee at the doctoral level. 

The University provides access to an outstanding computer capability (the IBM 
System/370, Model 165 with a Model 40 remote terminal on campus and several 
conveniently located input terminals). Facilities for human factors research are 
also excellent for the study of environmental factors, biomechanics and work 
physiology, and performance assessment display systems evaluation. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IE 401 Industrial Engineering Analysis I. Prerequisites: IE 361, MA 405. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 171 

IE 402 Industrial Engineering Analysis II. Prerequisite: IE 401. 3(3-0) F. 

IE 403 Industrial Engineering Analysis III. Prerequisite: IE 401. 3(3-0) S. 

IE 408 Production Control. Prerequisites: IE 361, IE 401. 3(3-0) S. 

IE 421 Data Processing and Production Control Systems. Prerequisites: IE 352, 
CSC 111. 3(3-0) S. 

IE 453 Operations Planning and Plant Layout. Prerequisite: IE 352. 3(2-3) F. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADV^^NCED UNDERGRADUATES 

IE 505 (MA 505, OR 505) Mathematical Programming I. Prerequisite: MA 
405. 3(3-0) F.Sum. A study of mathematical methods applied to problems of planning. 
Linear programming will be covered in detail. This course is intended for those 
who desire to study this subject in depth and detail. It provides a rigorous and 
complete development of the theoretical and computational aspects of this technique 
as well as a discussion of a number of applications. Graduate Staff 

IE 509 (OR 509) Dynamic Programming. Prerequisites: MA 405, ST 421. 3(3-0) 
S.Sum. An introduction to the theory and computational aspects of dynamic pro- 
gramming and its application to sequential decision problems. 

Nuttle, Elmaghraby 

IE 511 Advanced Engineering Project Analysis. Prerequisites: IE 311, ST 421. 
3(3-0) F. Analysis of project economy models with certainty assumed, advantages 
and limitations of models, effects of income tax and depreciation methods. Risk 
analyses employing probability concepts, sensitivity studies and measures of utility. 
Estimation techniques and use of accounting information, time series analysis and 
judgment factors. Planning and uses of capital funds. Bernhard, Canada 

IE 515 Process Engineering. Prerequisites: IE 328, IE 443. 3(3-0) F. The technical 
process of translating product design into a manufacturing program. The application 
of industrial engineering in the layout, tooling, methods, standards, costs and 
control functions of manufacturing. Laboratory problems covering producer and 
consumer products. Harder 

IE 517 Automatic Processes. Prerequisites: IE 328, IE 443. 3(3-0) S. Principles 
and methods for automatic processing. The design of product, process and controls. 
Economic, physical and sociological effects of automation. Harder 

IE 521 Control Systems and Data Processing. Prerequisite: IE 421. 3(3-0) S. 
This course presents the problems and techniques required for systematic control 
of the production process and the business enterprise. This includes the determina- 
tion of control factors, the collection and recording of data, and the processing, 
evaluation and use of data. The course will illustrate the applications and use of 
data processing equipment and information machines in industrial processes. Case 
problems will be used extensively. Llewellyn 

IE 522 (OR 522) Dynamics of Industrial Systems. Prerequisite: IE 421. 3(3-0) F. 
A study of the dynamic properties of industrial systems; introduction to servo- 
mechanism theory as applied to company operations. Simulation of large nonlinear, 
multiloop, stochastic systems on a digital computer; methods of determining modi- 
fication in systems design and/or operating parameters for improved system 
behavior. Llewellyn 



172 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



IE 523 Inventory Control Methods I. Prerequisites: ST 421, ST 515, OR 501. 
3(3-0) S. A study of inventory policy with respect to reorder sizes, minimum points 
and production schedules. Simple inventory models, models with restrictions, price 
breaks, price changes, analysis of slow-moving inventories. Introduction to the 
smoothing problems in continuous manufacturing. Applications of linear and 
dynamic programming. Alvarez 

IE 540 (PSY 540) Human Factors in Systems Design. Prerequisites: IE 338 
(PSY 338) or IE 354; Corequisites: ST 507 or ST 515. 3(3-0) F. Introduction to 
problems of the systems development cycle, including man-machine function alloca- 
tion, military specifications, display-control compatibility, the personnel sub- 
system concept and maintainability design. Detailed treatment is g^iven to man as 
an information processing mechanism. Pearson 

IE 541 Research Methods in Accident Study. Prerequisites: IE 338 (PSY 338), 
ST 421. 3(2-2) F. Consideration of the methods used in accident-injury study, 
including field investigation, experimental engineering and biomedical research, 
statistical studies and computer simulation. Ayoub 

IE 542 Physiological Criteria in Work Measurement. Prerequisite: Graduate 
status. 3(3-0) F. Emphasis is placed on basic endocrine and autonomic nervous 
system anatomy and physiology; measures reflecting sympathetic nervous system 
activity; concepts applicable to work measurement studies including a discussion 
of arousal theory and the concept of autonomic balance; and survey of current litera- 
ture on equipment design and use. (Offered in alternate years.) Ayoub 

IE 544 Occupational Biomechanics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in engineer- 
ing. 3(2-2) F. General concepts and techniques of understanding the anatomical 
and physiological bases of human motion. Characteristics and limitations of human 
motor capabilities, body mechanics, and use of biomedical instrumentation for 
monitoring and quantifying human performance. Applications of biomechanics in 
work, industry, rehabilitation, sports, space research and safety are also considered. 
(To be offered in alternate years.) Ayoub 

IE 546 Advanced Quality Control. Prerequisites: IE 353, ST 421. 3(3-0) S. The 
statistical foundations of quality control are emphasized as well as its economic 
implications. Mathematical derivations of most of the formulas used are given. 
Sampling techniques are treated extensively and many applications of this powerful 
technique are explained. Graduate Staff 

IE 547 Engineering Reliability. Prerequisites: IE 353, ST 421. 3(3-0) F. The 
methodology of reliability including application of discrete and continuous dis- 
tribution models and statistical designs; reliability estimation, reliability structure 
models, reliability demonstration and decision, and reliability growth models. 
Example of reliability evaluation and demonstration progrrams. Magazine 

IE 561 (OR 561) Queues and Stochastic Service Systems. Prerequisite: MA 421. 
3(3-0) F. General concepts of stochastic processes are introduced. Poisson processes, 
Markov processes and renewal theory are presented. These are then used in the 
analysis of queues, starting with a completely memoryless queue to one with general 
parameters. Applications to many engineering problems will be considered. 

Magazine 

IE 586 (OR 586) Network Flows. Prerequisite: IE 505 (OR 505, MA 505) or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. This course will study problems of flows in networks. These 
problems will include the determination of the shortest chain, maximal flow and 
minimal cost flow in networks. The relationship between network flows and linear 



THE GRADUATET CATALOG 173 



programming will be developed as well as problems with nonlinear cost functions, 
multi commodity flows and the problem of network synthesis. (Offered in alternate 
years.) Bennington 

IE 591 Project Work. Prerequisite: Graduate or senior standing. 2-6. Investigation 
and report on an assigned problem for students enrolled in the fifth-year curriculum 
in industrial engineering. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

IE 608 Linear Programming Applications. Prerequisite: IE 505 (MA 505, OR 
505) or EC 555. 3(3-0) S. The application of linear programming to large problems 
of a practical nature; product mix, diet, scheduling and blending problems; problem 
generation, control of accuracy, report generation. Stress is laid on post-optimal 
studies, multiple-objective functions and right-hand sides; parametric programming 
on the right hand side, the objective function, the rim and the interior. Decom- 
position of various types of problems will receive considerable attention with ex- 
tensions into some nonlinear systems. (Offered in alternate years.) Bennington 

IE 611 The Design of Production Systems. Prerequisites: IE 505 (MA 505, OR 
505), OR 501. 3(3-0) F. The study of production systems: the model, the criterion, 
decision making and optimization, levels of decision. The graphic representation 
of systems: signal flow graphs, activity analysis, networks of flow models. The 
machine assignment problem, scheduling and sequencing, line balancing location- 
allocation of new facilities. The use of computers in the design of production systems. 
(Offered in alternate years.) Elmaghraby 

IE 622 Inventory Control Methods II. Prerequisite: IE 523. 3(3-0) F. A continua- 
tion of IE 523; stochastic inventory systems of lot sized-reorder type; periodic 
review and single period models. Application of dynamic programming theory to 
deterministic and stochastic cases. Nuttle 

IE 640 (PSY 640) Skilled Operator Performance. Prerequisites: PSY 545, ST 
507, or ST 515. 3(3-0) S. Theories of the human operator are considered with regard 
to the classical problems of monitoring, vigilance and tracking. Factors such as 
biologfical rhythm. Sleep loss, sensory restriction, environmental stress and time- 
sharing are considered as they interact with and determine overall systems 
efficiency. (Offered in alternate years.) Pearson 

IE 641 Environmental Factors and Human Performance. Prerequisites: IE 540 
(PSY 540) and IE 542 or other equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Study of major problem areas, 
methodology, theory and experimental work in biotechnology; interaction among 
engineering, biological and behavioral factors in design for safety and survival; 
physiology and biomechanics of acceleration, deceleration and pressure altitude; 
consideration of operator effectiveness in submarine, extraterrestrial, arctic and 
desert environments; techniques in evaluation of crash dynamics and pathology; 
closed-ecological systems. (Offered in alternate years.) Pearson, Ayoub 

IE 651 Special Studies in Industrial Engineering. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. Credits Arranged. The purpose of this course is to allow individual students 
or small groups of students to undertake studies of special areas in industrial engi- 
neering which fit into their particular program and which may not be covered by 
existing industrial engineering graduate level courses. The work would be directed 
by a qualified staff member who has particular interest in the area covered by 
the problem. Such problems may require individual research and initiative in the 
application of industrial engineering training to new areas or fields. 

Graduate Staff 



174 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



IE 692 (OR 692, MA 692) Special Topics in Mathematical Programming. Pre- 
requisite: IE 505 (MA 505, OR 505). 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. The study of special advanced 
topics in the area of mathematical programming. New techniques and current re- 
search in this area will be discussed. The faculty responsible for this course will 
select the areas to be covered during the semester according to their preference 
and interest. This course will not necessarily be taught by an individual faculty 
member but can, on occasion, be a joint effort of several faculty members from this 
University as well as visiting faculty from other institutions. To date, a course on 
Theory of Networks and another on Integer Programming have been offered under 
the umbrella of this course. It is anticipated that these two topics will be repeated 
in the future together with other topics. Graduate Staff 

IE 693 Seminar in Systems Safety Engineering. Prerequisites: IE 540 (PSY 540), 
ST 515. 1(1-0) S. Discussion of contemporary issues involving the systems approach 
to accident prevention and injury control. History of safety research; federal health, 
industrial and military activities in safety; current centers of safety research and 
their activity. Pearson, Ayoub 

IE 694 Advanced Problems in Human Factors Engineering. Prerequisites: IE 
540 (PSY 540), ST 515. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Exploration in depth of a problem area of 
contemporary interest involving the man-machine-environment interface. Class 
discussion and analysis of research and theory, with special focus on the human 
factors aspects of systems design and operation. Pearson, Ayoub 

IE 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Seminar discussion of industrial engineering problems 
for graduate students. Case analyses and reports. Elmaghraby, Magazine 

IE 699 Industrial Engineering Research. Credits Arranged F,S,Sum. Graduate 
research in industrial engineering for thesis credit. Graduate Staff 



Industrial and Technical Education 
Industrial Arts Education 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see Industrial 
and Technical Education and Industrial Arts Education both under Education, 
pages 118, 119.) 

International Development 

Professor Jackson Rigney, Dean 

There is no question that America's need for trained personnel for service in 
foreign countries will increase greatly during the coming years. The world is 
moving inexorably toward greater interchange of people and greater volume of 
commerce between nations, and the number of Americans going abroad each year 
for business and pleasure is increasing at a fantastic rate. This growing interchange 
among nations requires the services of skilled persons in all walks of life, but they 
must be persons who have the capability to move and work effectively between 
our culture and others. The demand is heavy for persons who are well qualified in 
a particular profession or discipline and who also have language and cultural back- 
ground in other parts of the world. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 175 



The degree of Master of Technology in International Development is offered to 
train students with the above background and interest. 

The degree of Master of Technology in International Development is designed 
to give an international orientation and perspective to the master's degree that is 
sought in any of the scientific and professional fields represented at this University. 
It is designed to provide specialized training for students who are interested in 
utilizing their skills in international activities, whether technical, consultative or 
administrative in character. It is also available to foreign students who are training 
for leadership roles in their own country. 

A wide selection of courses is available relating to the developmental, cultural 
and political aspects of Europe, Latin America and Asia. A number of seminars in 
diflFerent schools relating to international development are conducted each year 
and they are available to this program. The modern language department has one 
of the most complete language laboratories in the area and can use all phases of 
audio-aural-visual instruction in developing language competence. 

Application for admission to the Graduate School to pursue studies leading to 
the Master of Technology in International Development is processed through the 
oflfice of the Graduate Dean and the respective department in which the major 
course work will be taken. 

Requirements for admission are the same as for the Master of Science degree; 
namely, the applicant must have a bachelor's degree fi-om a college or university 
that is recognized as standard by a regional or general accrediting agency, and 
the student must have at least a "B" grade average in his undergraduate major. 

The program of work for this degree includes the following: 

1. A total of 36 semester credits is required, not less than half of which must be 
in the field of the undergraduate major or closely related areas. The remainder 
stresses course work providing special orientation and training that prepares the 
student for accepting technical, consulting or administrative responsibilities. In 
the area of the minor, 12 semester credits may be drawn from courses at the 300 
and 400 levels, of which no more than six credits may be taken fi-om the 300 level. 

2. A minimum field experience of 12 weeks in a foreign country, or for foreign 
students, equivalent field experience in this country that is closely related to his 
major (no formal credit allowed toward the degree). 

3. A report on the field experience will replace the research thesis requirement 
of the Master of Science degree. 

4. Conversational facility in one language (no formal credit allowed toward 
the degree). 

In all other respects the requirements are the same as for the Master of Science 
degree. For further information contact the Office of International Programs, 209 
Daniels Hall. 



Landscape Architecture 

GRADUATE FAGULTY 

Professor R. R. Wilkinson, Head 

Prcfessors: J. H. Cox, C. E. McKinney, T. O. Perry, D. R. Stuart, E. G. Thur- 



176 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

low; Visiting Associate Professors: D. H. Ensign, W. G. Roberts; Assistant 
Professors: R. T. Hester Jr., J. Porter 

The program leading to the Master of Landscape Architecture degree provides 
a structure for students to explore the complexity of changing environmental 
situations and develop more comprehensive techniques in analysis and synthesis. 
The program requires four semesters of academic work built around a core of four 
workshops comprising 18 semester hours. As a means to focus workshop activity 
on a common matrix, an area of North Carolina with complex environmental 
problems will serve as a laboratory, comprising a complex of public and private 
activity to both observe and engage in the process of physical change. 

A series of professional electives are required to study the existing methods and 
techniques of environmental design. These courses function to integrate the many 
unrelated approaches to environmental manipulation and design. 

There are electives in the basic sciences that support effective employment of 
each student's program. These courses may be elected in any of three universities 
in the Triangle area: North Carolina State University, Duke, or University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. These afford an opportunity for the student to gain 
a structured insight to another discipline and be conversant with its methodology 
and content. 

The degree requirement, in addition to the 48 hours of academic work, is a 
seminar delivered in the terminal semester that relates the methods of environ- 
mental design to a student's elective path. Constraints posed by the program are 
the requirements that the student develop his worked examples within the labora- 
tory area and that he focus both design skills and supporting knowledge on the 
final worked example. 

Students will be admitted to the program from a variety of disciplines to ensure 
an adequate mixture of student involvements. 

Design Core— This series of workshops treats the region as a group of related sys- 
tems. The sequence of problems begins with simple congruencies and evolves to a 
complete synthesis of environmental systems in the terminal case study. Courses in- 
cluded in this section are LAR 503, LAR 504, LAR 603 and LAR 604. 

Analytical and Integrative Core — This series of courses relates regional land- 
scape design to other design professions and the information sources supporting 
large-scale design activities. 

The courses, LAR 521 and LAR 611, represent a commitment on the part of the 
landscape architecture feculty to the environmental design and planning disciplines 
in general. The integrative core courses are not specifically required of the LAR 
graduate student but can be elected with consent of one's adviser as part of the 12 
hours required for tfiis phase of the program. Other courses presently existing with- 
in established programs at the Raleigh and Chapel Hill campuses can be elected to 
meet the students' particular needs. 

Minor Programs— This series of electives in areas of study provides a critical 
information source. Students will elect courses in these areas under the direction of 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 177 



their minor adviser. Counseling will be conducted by the associated faculty, and 
students will be expected to demonstrate a level of proficiency comparable to 
others developing academic minors in these areas. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

LAR 400 Intermediate Landscape Architecture Design (Series). Prerequisite: DN 
202 or equivalent or consent of department. 4(1-9) F,S. 

LAR 411, 412 Landscape Technology. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3(1-6) F,S. 

LAR 491 Special Projects in Landscape Architecture. Prerequisites: Senior stand- 
ing and 3.0 G.P.A. 2-4 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

LAR 503 Regional Design Workshop L Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(0-9) 
F,S. Study of current literature in regional design and planning with emphasis on 
extracting a number of premises, theoretical structures and information handling 
techniques as a basis for seminar discussions and activities. 

LAR 504 Regional Design Workshop IL Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(0-9) 
F,S. Case study projects designed to explore the relationship between the resource 
base and the development intentions with the purpose of evolving clear statements 
of problems involved and their susceptibility to solution problem situations will be 
developed from differing viewpoints and levels of complexity. 

LAR 512 Physical Systems. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3(2-2) S. Analysis 
of physical systems and methods of determining relationships between systems with 
particular reference to natural systems, managed resource systems, development 
systems and their relationship to development objectives. 

LAR 521 Introduction to Regional Design. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
3(2-2) F. A perspective of the measures man has taken to ensure his relation to the 
general environment. Ecologic determinism, economic and political functionalism 
and aesthetic movements will be developed in an historical context. 

LAR 591, 592 Special Projects. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 4(2-6) F,S. Stu- 
dent-evolved projects with emphasis on utilization and expansion of technical pro- 
cesses and techniques to reinforce design solutions. Introduction and investigation 
of experimental methodology. Development of student-evolved interest in specific 
areas. Open to graduate students in related fields. Evaluation of nonmajors based on 
contributions of their discipline to group effort. 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

LAR 603 Regional Design III. Prerequisites: LAR 503, LAR 504. 3(0-9) F. Course 
will be directed at a synthesis of information handling methods and environmental 
design theory within an institutional context. The procedure will be to clarify envi- 
ronmental problems, generate alternative solutions to problems, illustrate the physi- 
cal implications of alternatives and evaluate the alternative on the basis of their 
capacity to be implemented through established institutions and agencies. The 
course will be structured around existing situations which have the capacity to be 
abstracted into prototypical situations. 



178 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



LAR 604 Regional Design IV. Prerequisites: LAR 503, LAR 504, LAR 603. 3-6 S. 
Terminal project for regional design degree students. Projects will be selected and 
developed by individual students under the direction of major and minor professors. 

LAR 611 Physical Design Policy. Prerequisite: LAR 503 and consent of instruc- 
tor. 3(2-2) F,S. Course will be directed at a detailed examination of public policy 
regarding control of the physical environment. Emphasis will be focused on policies 
which are directed at control of land use, such as road, utilities, water, etc. and their 
relationship to policies regarding less tangible commodities such as public health, 
education, recreation, etc. 

LAR 691 Degree Seminar. Prerequisites: LAR 503, LAR 504, LAR 603; Corequi- 
site: LAR 604. 0. Each student in his terminal semester and in conjunction with his 
terminal case study will prepare and submit to his committee a presentation on the 
relevance of his minor to the design process with particular reference to his case 
study. 



Marine Sciences 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. J. Langfeij>er, Chairman 

Professors: M. Amein, A. W. Cooper, B. J. Copeland, J. A. Edw^ards, W. W. 
Hassler, J. E. HoBBiE, C. J. Leith, L S. Longmuir, W. J. Sauqer, J. C. 
Williams III; Associate Professors: N. E. Huang, L. H. Royster, F. Y. 
SoRRELL, N. B. Webb, A. H. Weber, C. W. Welby; Adjunct Associate Pro- 
fessor: J. R. Smith; Assistant Professors: J. Daggerhart, C. E. Knowles, J. L. 
Machemehl, L. J. Pietrafesa, T. Wolcott 

The oceans are perhaps man's last great frontier on earth. Further understanding 
of the oceans and effective utihzation of their resources depends upon a thorough 
knowledge of the geography of the sea and its logistics, the mineral resources of the 
sea and their extraction, the biological resources of the sea and their utilization, 
ocean pollution, and deep sea and coastal engineering. North Carolina is richly en- 
dowed with marine environments and resources. The state has over 300 miles of 
shoreline which enclose about 2,500 square miles of shallow sounds and associated 
habitats. In addition, an extensive continental shelf and proximity to the Gulf 
Stream and cold northern waters make for rich and varied opportunities for the 
study of marine science. 

The curriculum in marine sciences brings together the faculties and facilities of 
both the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State Uni- 
versity to offer broad graduate training in the various areas of marine sciences. The 
program gives students a wide choice of faculty advisers, marine science courses 
and potential research projects. Departments on the North Carolina State campus 
involved in this curriculum include biochemistry, biological and agricultural engi- 
neering, botany, chemical engineering, chemistry, civil engineering, economics, 
engineering mechanics, food science, genetics, geosciences, mechanical and areo- 
space engineering, microbiology, physics, soil science and zoology. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 179 

A variety of facilities are available to students wishing to do research in marine 
sciences. North Carolina State University has the Pamlico Marine Laboratory at 
Aurora and another lab at Hatteras administered by the Department of Zoology. 
The Harbor Island Marine Science Center at Wrightsville Beach is available for use 
as a field research station. Students may also use the facilities of the Institute of 
Marine Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Bureau 
of Commercial Fisheries Lab at Beaufort. Individuals with special interests in 
coastal engineering and protection, coastal geology and coastal ecology may parti- 
cipate in the research of members of the North Carolina Research Program. 

For admission to the curriculum in marine sciences, an undergraduate degree is 
required in a basic science such as bacteriology, biology, botany, chemistry, engi- 
neering, geology, physics or zoology. A graduate student may choose to major in 
marine sciences or he may major in a field represented by a regular department and 
minor in marine sciences. A major in marine sciences is normally expected to be 
familiar with other areas of marine sciences in addition to the area in which one 
specializes. In order to provide for some breadth within the program, physical 
oceanography, biological oceanography, geological oceanography, chemical ocean- 
ography, and meteorological oceanography have been designated as core areas. It 
is normally expected that the graduate student will take two or more of these 
courses outside the area of specialization. Requirements for the minor, the thesis, 
the language, admission to candidacy, residence and final examinations are as spe- 
cified in the regulations of the Graduate School. 



MAS 471 (MAE 471) Undersea Vehicle Design. 3(3-0) S. (See mechanical and 
areospace engineering, page 194.) 

MAS 487 (CE 487, OY 487) Physical Oceanography. 3(3-0) S. (See physical 
oceanography, page 214.) 

MAS 529 (ZO 529) Biological Oceanography. 3(3-0) S. (See zoology, page 278.) 

MAS 541 (OY 541, CE 541) Gravity Wave Theory L 3(3-0) S. (See physical 
oceanography, page 214.) 

MAS 551 (OY 551) Ocean Circulation. 3(3-0) S. (See physical oceanography, 
page 214.) 

MAS 581 (CE 581) Introduction to Oceanographic Engineering. 3(3-0) F. (See 
civil engineering, page 97.) 

MAS 584 (GY 584) Marine Geology. 3(3-0) S. (See geology, page 162.) 

MAS 591, 592 Marine Sciences Seminar. 1(1-0) S. A seminar designed to give per- 
spective in the field of marine science. Topics vary from semester to semester. In or- 
der to obtain credit a student must deliver a seminar. 

MAS 601, 602 (OY 601, 602) Advanced Physical Oceanography I, II. 3(3-0) F,S. 
(See physical oceanography, page 214.) 

MAS 605, 606 (OY 605, 606; EM 605, 606) Advanced Geophysical Fluid Me- 
chanics I, II. 3(3-0) F,S. (See physical oceanography, page 214.) 



180 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



MAS 613, 614 (OY 613, 614; EM 613, 614) Perturbation Method in Fluid Me- 
chanics I, II. 3(3-0) F,S. (See physical oceanography, page 214.) 

MAS 693 Special Topics in Marine Sciences. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 
consent of staff. 1-3. This course will provide the opportunity for advanced graduate 
students to study in special problem areas in marine sciences. Various areas in the 
program may use this course concurrently in their areas. 

MAS 699 (OY 699) Research in Physical Oceanography. Credits Arranged. F,S. 

(See physical oceanography, page 214.) 

UNC-CH MAS 101 General Oceanography. 3(3-0) F. A study of the seas and their 
processes. 

UNC-CH MAS 105 (ESE 128) Chemical Oceanography. 3(3-0) S. A variation and 
abundance of sea water constituents. The chemical, physical and biological pro- 
cesses contributing to the distribution and problems of dispersion of conservative 
and nonconservative substances are considered. 



RECOMMENDED COURSES IN PARTICIPATING DEPARTMENTS 

Biological Marine Science 

(ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology 
(ZO 560) Principles of Ecology 
(MB 574) Phycology 

General Microbiology 

Fishery Science 

Ichthyology 

Growth and Reproduction of Fishes 

Population Ecology 

Limnology 

Advanced Limnology 

Fishery Science 



Sedimentary Petrology 
Exploratory Geophysics 
Applied Sedimentary Analysis 
Sedimentary Environments of Deposition 
Geochemistry 
Soil Mineralogy 

Physical Marine Science 

CE 517 Water Transportation 

CE 548, 549 Engineering Properties of Soils I, II 

CE 641, 642 Advanced Soil Mechanics 

EM 504 Mechanicsof Ideal Fluids 

EM 505 Mechanics of Viscous Fluids I 

EM 612 Mechanicsof Viscous Fluids II 

MAE 651 Principles of Fluid Motion 



BO 


360 


BO 


560 


BO 


574 


MB 


401 


ZO 


420 


ZO 


441 


ZO 


515 


ZO 


517 


ZO 


519 


ZO 


619 


ZO 


621 


BOlOi 

GY 


gictU 
452 


GY 


552 


GY 


563 


GY 


564 


GY 


567 


ssc 


; 553 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 181 



Materials Engineering 
GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. W. Austin, Head 

Professors: J. R. Heeler Jr., R. B. Benson Jr., A. A. Fahmy, J. K. Magor, C. R. 
Manning Jr., K. L. Moazed; Research Professors: H. Palmour III, H. H. 
Stadelmaier, R. F. Stoops; Professor Emeritus: W. W. Kriegel; Adjunct 
Professor: H. M. Davis; Associate Professors: J. V. Hamme, G. O. Harrell; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: G. Mayer; Assistant Professor: R. F. Davis; 
Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. C. Hurt 

The Department of Materials Engineering offers graduate programs leading to 
the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. Graduate courses in 
materials science and engineering are also offered for the benefit of students major- 
ing in other areas who may wish to obtain a minor in materials fields. 

Financial assistance is available to qualified graduate students in materials engi- 
neering. Graduate assistantships permit half-time studies toward advanced degrees, 
and half time to be devoted to teaching or research. Sponsored fellowships and trainee- 
ships that permit full-time graduate study are available on a competitive basis. 
Applications should be made to the department. 

During the past decade rapid developments in aerospace, electronics and nuclear 
technologies, and an array of societal problems and their attendant materials prob- 
lems have resulted in increased emphasis on graduate study and research on the 
fundamental properties and behavior of materials, as well as on applications-orient- 
ed research. 

Graduate programs in materials engineering are highly flexible. The department 
refi"ains from establishing a rigidly formalized sequence of courses for advanced de- 
gree candidates and recognizes flexibility as of utmost importance regardless of the 
candidate's prior specialization. Emphasis may be placed upon fundamental re- 
search or upon the application of basic concepts in materials science to various 
engineering and societal problems. 

Therefore, the programs of study for graduate students majoring in materials are 
determined by the candidate in consultation with his adviser and graduate commit- 
tee, and depend on the background and the needs of the candidate. 

The departmental faculty is strong in metallurgical engineering and ceramic 
engineering. A cooperative program with the Department of Chemical Engineering 
provides for graduate study and research in polymeric materials. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAT 401 Materials Processing. Prerequisites: MAT 301, MAT 450, MAT 412. 3 
(3-0). 

MAT 411, 412 Physical Principles in Materials Science I, II. Prerequisites: (411) 
MAT 201; (412) MAT 41L 3(3-0). 



182 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



MAT 417 Ceramic Subsystem Design. Prerequisite: MAT 312. 3(2-3). 

MAT 423, 424 Materials Factors in Design I, II. Prerequisites: (423) MAT 450; 
(424) MAT 423; Corequisites: ( 423) MAT 431. (423) 3(3-0), (424) 3(3-0). 

MAT 431, 432 Physical Metallurgy I, II. Prerequisites: (431) MAT 412; (432) 
MAT 431. 3(3-0). 

MAT 435, 436 Physical Ceramics I, II. Prerequisites: (435) MAT 412; (436) MAT 
435. (435) 3(3-0), (436) 3(2-3). 

MAT 437 Introduction to the Vitreous State. Prerequisite: MAT 301. 3(3-0). 

MAT 450 Mechanical Properties of Materials. Prerequisite: MAT 201 and EM 
205. 3(3-0). 

MAT 491 Materials Engineering Seminar. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 1(1-0). 

MAT 493, 494 Ceramic Field Exercises I, II. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 1(0-3). 

MAT 495 Materials Engineering Projects. Prerequisite: Junior or senior stand- 
ing. Credits Arranged, 1-3. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAT 500 Modern Concepts in Materials Science. Prerequisite: MAT 412. 3(3-0) F. 
Applications of current theories of materials such as crystal theory, continuum and 
quasi-continuum theories, phenomenological theories, etc., to the solution of mater- 
ials problems. 

MAT 503 Ceramic Microscopy. Prerequisite: GY 331. 3(2-3) F. Transmitted and 
reflected light techniques for the systematic study of ceramic materials and pro- 
ducts. 

MAT 5()9 High Vacuum Technology. Prerequisite: CH 433 or MAE 301. 3(2-3) S. 
Properties of low-pressure gases and vapors. Production, maintenance and measure- 
ment of high vacuum; design, construction and operation of high vacuum, high tem- 
perature facilities. Properties and reactions of materials which are processed, tested 
and/or utilized in high vacuum environments. 

MAT 510 Structure of Crystalline Materials. Prerequisite: MAT 411; Corequisite: 
MAT 500. 3(3-0) F. The lattice structure of crystals, including group theory applica- 
tions, reciprocal lattice concept and the study of crystal structure as related to bond- 
ing. 

MAT 520 Theory and Structure of Materials. Prerequisite: MAT 510. 3(3-0) F. 
Structure of liquids, and crystalline and amorphous solids used in engineering sys- 
tems. Crystallinity and thermal properties. Ionic crystals in ceramic systems. The 
metallic state and alloy behavior. Emphasis is placed on the relation between funda- 
mental materials parameters and engineering properties. 

MAT 527 Refractories in Service. Prerequisite: MAT 411. 3(3-0) S. A study of the 
physical and chemical properties of the more important refractories in respect to 
their environment in industrial and laboratory furnaces. 

MAT 529 Properties of High Temperature Materials. Prerequisite: MAT 201. 3 
(3-0) S. Effects of temperature on the physical, mechanical and chemical properties 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 183 



of inorganic materials; relationships between microstructure and high temperature 
properties; applications of ceramics, metals and composites at elevated tempera- 
tures. 

MAT 530 Phase Transformation in Materials I. Corequisite: MAT 500. 3(3-0) F. 
Kinetic theory of transformations, nucleation theory, homogeneous and heterogene- 
ous nucleation, growth of crystals, epitaxial thin films. 

MAT 533, 534 Advanced Ceramic Engineering Design I, II. Prerequisite: MAT 
417. 3(2-3) F,S. Advanced studies in analysis and design of ceramic products, pro- 
cesses and systems leading to original solutions of current industrial problems and 
the development of new concepts of manufacturing. 

MAT 540 Glass Technology. Prerequisite: MAT 437. 3(3-0) F. Fundamentals of 
glass manufacture including compositions, properties and application of the princi- 
pal types of commercial glasses. 

MAT 541, 542 Principles of Corrosion I, II. Prerequisite: MAT 431 or CH 431. 3 
(2-3) F,S. The fundamentals of metallic corrosion and passivity. The electro-chem- 
ical nature of corrosive attack, basic forms of corrosion, corrosion rate factors, meth- 
ods of corrosion protection. Laboratory work included. 

MAT 550 Dislocation Theory. Prerequisite: MAT 450. 3(3-0) F. Structure, ener- 
getics, stress and strain fields, interactions and motion of dislocations in solids. 

MAT 556 Composite Materials. Prerequisite: MAT 450. 3(3-0) F. Basic principles 
underlying the properties of composite materials as related to properties of the indi- 
vidual constituents and their interaction. Emphasis is placed on the design of com- 
posite systems to yield desired combinations of properties. 

MAT 562 (NE 562) Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering. Prerequisite: 
PY 410 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. Reactor component design considerations 
determined by materials properties as well as by nuclear function are covered. Em- 
phasis is placed on radiation effects and other concepts pertinent to the selection of 
materials for nuclear reactors for either terrestrial or space applications. 

MAT 573 (NE 573) Computer Experiments in Materials Engineering. Prerequi- 
sites: PY 407, MA 301. 3(3-0) F. The basic techniques for constructing both statis- 
tical (Monte (Tarlo) and deterministic computer experiments are explained and dis- 
cussed from the standpoint of immediate use in the solution of current engineering 
research and development problems. 

MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments. Prerequisite: MAT 411. Credits 
Arranged, 1-3. Advanced engineering principles applied to a specific experimental 
project dealing with materials. A seminar period is provided and a written report is 
required. 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MAT 601 Ceramic Phase Relationships. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 
(3-0) S. Heterogeneous equilibrium phase transformations, dissociation, fusion, lat- 
tice energy, defect structure, thermodynamic properties of ionic phases and silicate 
melts. 

MAT 603 Advanced Ceramic Reaction Kinetics. Prerequisite: MAT 510. 3(3-0) S. 
Fundamental study of the kinetics of high temperature ceramic reactions such as 



184 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



diffusion, nucleation, grain growth, recrystallization, phase transformation, vitrifi- 
cation and sintering. 

MAT 610 X-ray Diffraction. Prerequisite: MAT 510. 3(3-0) F. The properties and 
scattering behavior of X-rays by electrons, ions and atoms. Theory and applications 
of X-ray diffraction techniques such as Laue back reflection, the rotating crystal 
and powder methods, texture studies and residual stress analysis. 

MAT 615 Electron Microscopy. Prerequisites: MAT 550, MAT 610. 3(3-0) F. The- 
ory of imaging and diffraction of electrons. Analysis of structures using electron 
microscopy. 

MAT 621 Theory and Structure of Amorphous Materials. Prerequisite: MAT 520. 
3(3-0) S. Bond types and structure of amorphous solids, relations of bond types and 
structure to flow mechanisms, electrical, optical and thermal properties. 

MAT 622 Theory and Structure of Ceramic Materials. Prerequisite: MAT 520. 3 
(3-0) F. Electrical and optical properties of non-conducting materials, ferro-electric 
behavior and materials parameters, magnetic properties of non-metallics, semi-con- 
ducting materials. 

MAT 623 Theory and Structure of Metallic Materials. Prerequisite: MAT 520. 3 
(3-0) F. The metallic state, its atomic and electronic structure. Electron theory of 
metals and alloys. Advanced methods of determining electronic structure in metal- 
lic materials. 

MAT 630 Phase Transformation in Materials II. Prerequisites: MAT 510, MAT 
530, MAT 550. 3(3-0) F. Formal theories of solid-solid transformations, transforma- 
tion mechanisms, transformation morphologies. 

MAT 631, 632 Advanced Physical Ceramics I, II. Corequisites: MAT 510, 610 or 
MAT 530, 630 or EM 501, 502 or PY 503, 552. 3(2-3) F,S. Lattice structures and lat- 
tice energfies in crystalline ceramics; relationships with elastic, optical and thermal 
properties. Effects of constitution and micro structure on lattice-sensitive properties. 
The defect crystalline state in ceramics; vacancies, color centers; dislocations, 
boundaries. Crystal growth. Plastic deformation processes, including creep and fati- 
grue; the ductile-brittle transition. Structure-sensitive properties of crystalline, vit- 
reous and composite ceramics; effects of constitution, microstructure and nonstoi- 
chiometry. 

MAT 633 Advanced Mechanical Properties of Materials. Prerequisite: MAT 630. 
3(3-0) F. The theories of yield strength, work hardening, creep, fracture, and fatigue 
of crystalline materials will be developed in terms of dislocation theory. 

MAT 661 Dififraction Theory. Prerequisite: MAT 610. 3(3-0) F. The diffraction of 
light. X-rays, electrons and neutrons by matter is represented in Fourier space, and 
the known methods of generating the Fourier transform (usually atomic structure) 
are reviewed. Exploration, by high and low angle scattering techniques, of crystals, 
paracrystals, liquids, polydispersed aggregates, and fibers is treated. The feasibility 
of direct analysis by convolution integrals is studied. 

MAT 691, 692 Special Topics in Materials Engineering. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. Credits Arranged, 1-3. Special studies of advanced topics in materials 
engineering. 

MAT 695 Materials Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Reports and discussion of 
special topics in materials engineering and allied fields. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 185 



MAT 699 Materials Engineering Research. Credits Arranged. Independent inves- 
tigation of an appropriate research problem. A report on this investigation is 
required as a graduate thesis. 



Mathematics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor N. J. Rose, Head 

Professors: J. W. Bishir, E. E. BimNiSTON, J. M. A. Danby, W. J. Harrington, K. 
KoH, J. Levine, p. E. Lewis, J. Luh, H. M. Nahikian, P. A. Nickel, H. V. 
Park, H. Sagan, H. E. Speece, R. A. Struble, H. R. Van der Vaart, O. 
Wesler, L. S. Winton; Professor Emeritus: R. C. Bullock; Associate Profes- 
sors: R. E. Chandler — Graduate Administrator, W. G. Dotson Jr., R. O. 
FuLP, J. E. HuNEYCUTT Jr., J. R. KoLB, J. A. Marun, C. D. Meyer, E. L. 
Stitzinger, J. B. Wilson; Assistant Professors: S. L. Campbell, H. J. 
Charlton, D. E. Garoutte, R. Cellar, D. J. Hansen, R. E. Hartwtg, 
R. H. Martin Jr., L. B. Page, C. V. Pao, R. T. Ramsay, J. A. Roulier, R. 
Silber, J. L. Sox Jr., D. F. Ullrich, W. M. Waters Jr. 

The Mathematics Department oflFers programs leading to the degrees of Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy with a major in either Mathematics or Applied 
Mathematics. 

Applicants for admission should have an undergraduate degree in mathematics 
or its equivalent. This should include a year of mathematical analysis (or advanced 
calculus) and a year of modern algebra, including linear algebra. All applicants are 
requested to take the Graduate Record Examination including the Advanced Test 
in Mathematics. 

A number of teaching assistantships are available. A student carrying a half-time 
assistantship is allowed to carry a course load of nine semester hours. 

The requirements for the Master of Science degree include 30-33 semester hours 
of approved credits and a comprehensive examination. A masters thesis is optional. 
Foreign languages are not required for the Masters Degree. 

There is no prescribed minimum number of courses for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. Normally a student will take approximately 60 semester hours of 
course credits including certain core courses in algebra, analysis, topology and ap- 
plied mathematics. Independent reading and participation in seminars constitute 
an indispensable part of the doctoral program. 

All doctoral students are required to have a reading knowledge of two modem 
foreign languages or a knowledge in depth of one. Comprehensive examinations are 
also required. These consist of a written examination designed to test basic know- 
ledge of algebra, analysis, topology and applied mathematics, and an oral exami- 
nation on material related to the field of proposed thesis work. 

The heart of the doctoral program is the dissertation. It must be original research 
resulting in a significant contribution in some area of mathematics or its applica- 



186 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



tions and should be worthy of publication in the current literature. The doctoral 
dissertation must be defended at the final oral examination. 

A detailed statement of requirements for graduate degiees is available on re- 
quest from the graduate administrator. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II. Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312. 3 
(3-0) F^ 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra. Prerequisite: One year of calculus. 3 
(3-0) F,S. 

MA 404 Affine and Projective Geometry. Prerequisites: MA 231 and MA 403. 3 
(3-0) S. 

MA 405 Introduction to Matrices and Linear Transformations. Prerequisite: One 
year of calculus. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MA 408 Foundations of Euclidean Geometry. Prerequisite: MA 403. 3(3-0) F. 

MA 410 Theory of Numbers. Prerequisite: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 421 Introduction to Probability. Prerequisite: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) F, 
S. 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I. Prerequisite: MA 232. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MA 426 Mathematical Analysis 11. Prerequisite: MA 425. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MA 430 Introduction to Applied Mathematics. Prerequisites: MA 426, MA 421, or 
MA 214. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 433 History of M athematics. Prerequisite: One year of calculus. 3(3-0) S. 

MA 491 Reading in Honors Mathematics. Prerequisites: Membership in honors 
program, consent of department. 2-6 F,S. 

MA 493 Special Topics in Mathematics. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1-6 
F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MA 504 (NE 504) Mathematical Methods in Engineering. Prerequisite: MA 301 
or MA 312. 3(3-0) F. Survey of mathematical methods for engineers. Topics include 
ordinary differential equations, matrices, partial differential equations, difference 
equations, numerical methods, elements of statistics. Techniques and applications to 
engineering are stressed. This course cannot be taken for credit by mathematics 
majors. 

MA 505 (IE 505, OR 505) Mathematical Programming I. 3(3-0) F,Sum. (See in- 
dustrial engineering, page 171.) 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 187 



MA 511 Advanced Calculus I. Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312. 3(3-0) F,S. Funda- 
mental theorems on continuous functions; convergence theory of sequences, series 
and integrals; the Riemann integral. 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II. Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312. 3(3-0) F,S. Gen- 
eral theorems of partial differentiation; implicit function theorems; vector calculus 
in 3-space; line and surface integrals; classical integral theorems. 

MA 513 Introduction to Complex Variables. Prerequisite: MA 511 or MA 425. 3 
(3-0) F,S. Operations with complex numbers, derivatives, analytic functions, inte- 
grals, definitions and properties of elementary functions, multivalued functions, 
power series, residue theory and applications, conformal mapping. 

MA 514 Methods of Applied Mathematics. Prerequisite: MA 511 or MA 425. 3 
(3-0) S. Introduction to integral equations, the calculus of variations and difference 
equations. 

MA 515 Linear Functional Analysis I. Prerequisite: MA 426. 3(3-0) F. Metric 
Spaces; Lebesgue measure and integration; L^ and 1^ spaces; Riesz- Fischer and 
Riesz representation theorems; normed linear spaces and Hilbert spaces. 

MA 516 Linear Functional Analysis II. Prerequisite: MA 515. 3(3-0) S. Basic the- 
orems in Banach spaces, dual spaces, weak topologies; basic theorems in Hilbert 
spaces, and detailed theory of linear operators on Hilbert spaces; spectral theorem 
for self-adjoint completely continuous linear operators. 

MA 517 Introduction to Topology. Prerequisite: MA 426. 3(3-0) F,S. Sets and 
functions, metric spaces, topological spaces, compactness, separation, connectedness. 

MA 518 Calculus on Manifolds. Prerequisite: MA 426. 3(3-0) S. Calculus of sever- 
al variables from a modern viewpoint. Differential and integral calculus of several 
variables, vector functions, integration on manifolds, Stoke's and Green's theorems, 
vector analysis. 

MA 520 Linear Algebra. Prerequisite: MA 231 or MA 405. 3(3-0) F. Vector 
spaces, linear mappings and matrices, determinants, inner product spaces, bilinear 
and quadratic forms, canonical forms, spectral theorem. 

MA 521 Fundamentals of Modern Algebra. Prerequisites: MA 403 and MA 520. 3 
(3-0) S. Groups, normal subgroups, quotient groups, Cayley's theorem, Sylow's theo- 
rem. Rings, ideals and quotient rings, polynomial rings. Fields, extension fields, 
elements of Galois theory. 

MA 523 Topics in Applied Mathematics. Corequisites: MA 515, MA 520. 3(3-0) F. 
Formulation of scientific problems in mathematical terms, interpretation and evalu- 
ation of the mathematical analysis of the resulting models. The course will discuss 
problems in behavioral and biological sciences as well as problems in mechanics of 
discrete and continuous systems. Some discussion of optimization and the calculus 
of variations. 

MA 524 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences I. Prerequisites: MA 405, 
MA 512. 3(3-0) F. Green's functions and two-point boundary value problems; ele- 
mentary theory of distributions; generalized (Green's functions. Finite and infinite 
dimensional inner product spaces; Hilbert spaces; completely continuous operators; 
integral equations; the Fredholm alternative; eigenfiinction expansions; applica- 
tions to potential theory. Nonsingular and singular Sturm-Lioville problems; Weil's 
theorem. 



188 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



MA 525 Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences II. Prerequisite: MA 524. 
3(3-0) S. Distribution theory in n-space; Fourier transforms; partial differential 
equations, generalized solutions, fundamental solutions, Cauchy problem, wave and 
heat equations, well-set problems. Laplace's equation, the Dirichlet and Neumann 
problems, integral equations of potential theory. Green's functions, eigenfunction 
expansions. 

MA 527 (CSC 527) Numerical Analysis I. Prerequisites: CSC 101 or CSC 111, 
MA 301 or MA 312, and MA 231 or MA 405. 3(3-0) F,S. Theory of interpolation, 
numerical integration, iterative solutions of non-linear equations, numerical inte- 
gration of ordinary differential equations, matrix inversion and solution of simul- 
taneous linear equations. 

MA 528 (CSC 528) Numerical Analysis II. Prerequisite: MA 527 (CSC 527). 3 
(3-0) F,S. Least squares data approximation, expansions in terms of orthogonal 
functions, Gaussian quadrature, economization of series, minimax approximations, 
Pade approximations, eigenvalues of matrices. 

MA 532 Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations. Prerequisites: MA 301 or MA 
312, MA 405, advanced calculus. 3(3-0) S. Existence and uniqueness theorems, sys- 
tems of linear equations, fundamental matrices, matrix exponential, series solu- 
tions, regrular singular point; plane autonomous systems, stability theory. 

MA 536 Logic for Digital Computers, Prerequisite: MA 405. 3(3-0) F. Introduc- 
tion to symbolic logic and Boolean algebra; finite state-valued calculus and its ap- 
plication to combinational networks; sequential finite-state machines and their 
mathematical formulation; analysis and synthesis problems of sequential machines. 

MA 537 Mathematical Theory of Digital Computers. Prerequisite: MA 536. 3(3-0) 

S. The sequential machine and its characteristic semigroup; micro-programmed 
computers; general purpose computers and special-pvupose computers; Turing ma- 
chine and infinite-state machines; nondeterministic switching system and probabil- 
istic automata. 

MA 541 (ST 541) Theory of Probability I. Prerequisite: MA 425 or MA 511. 3 
(3-0) F. Axioms, combinatorial analysis, conditional probability, independence, ran- 
dom variables, expectation, special discrete and continuous distributions, probabil- 
ity and moment generating functions, central limit theorem, laws of large numbers, 
branching processes, recurrent events, random walk. 

MA 542 (ST 542) Theory of Probability II. Prerequisites: MA 405, MA 541. 3 
(3-0) S. Markov chains and Markov processes, Poisson process, birth and death pro- 
cesses, queuing theory, renewal theory, stationary processes, Brownian motion. 

MA 545 Set Theory and Foundations of Mathematics. Prerequisite: MA 403. 3 
(3-0) S. Logic and the axiomatic approach, the Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms and other 
systems, algebra of sets and order relations, equivalents of the Axiom of Choice, 
one-to-one correspondences, cardinal and ordinal numbers, the Continuum Hypothe- 
sis. 

MA 555 (FY 555) Mathematical Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. Prerequi- 
site: One year of advanced calculus. 3(3-0) F. Central orbits, N-body problem, 3- 
body problem, Hamilton-Jacobi theory, Perturbation theory, applications to motion 
of celestial bodies. 

MA 556 (PY 556) Orbital Mechanics. Prerequisites: MA 301, MA 405, knowledge 
of elementary mechanics and computer programming. 3(3-0) S. Keplerian motion. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 189 



interative solutions, numerical integration, differential corrections and space navi- 
gation, elements of probability, least squares, sequential estimation, Kalman filter. 

MA 571 (BMA 571, ST 571) Biomathematics I. 3(3-0) F. (See biomathematics, 
page 80.) 

MA 572 (BMA 572, ST 572) Biomathematics II. 3(3-0) S. (See biomathematics, 
page 80.) 

MA 581 Special Topics. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1-6 F,S. 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MA 600 Advanced Differential Equations I. Prerequisites: MA 513, MA 518, MA 
520. 3(3-0) F. Analytical theory of ordinary differential equations, stability theory, 
perturbations, asymptotic behavior, nonlinear oscillations. 

MA 601 Advanced Differential Equations II. Prerequisite: MA 600. 3(3-0) S. Qual- 
itative theory of ordinary differential equations, general properties of dynamical 
systems, limit sets, integral invariants, global theory. 

MA 602 Partial Differential Equations I. Prerequisites: MA 426, MA 520, MA 
532 or MA 600. 3(3-0) F. First order equations, initial value problems; theory of 
characteristics; existence and uniqueness theorems; hyperbolic equations. 

MA 603 Partial Differential Equations II. Prerequisite: MA 602. 3(3-0) S. Ellip- 
tic and parabolic equations; approximation methods; generalized solutions. 

MA 604 Topology. Prerequisites: MA 515, MA 520. 3(3-0) S. Topological spaces: 
separation axioms, compactness, connectedness, local topological properties; contin- 
uous mappings, and convergence; product and quotient spaces; compactifi cation; 
homotopy equivalence of mappings, fundamental groups, covering spaces, universal 
coverings, deck transformations. 

MA 605 Homology and Manifolds. Prerequisite: MA 604. 3(3-0) F. Homology; 
either simplicial or singular theory, excision theorem, homotopy theorem, Mayer- 
Vietroris theorem and computation of groups, topology and geometry of differen- 
tiate manifolds, vector fields, Lie derivations, and differential equations; smooth 
partiations of unity, integration, differential forms and Stokes theorem; the De- 
Rham cohomology and the DeRham theorem. 

MA 606 (ST 606, OR 606) Mathematical Programming II. 3(3-0) S. (See statis- 
tics, page 256.) 

MA 611 Analytic Function Theory I. Prerequisite: MA 426. 3(3-0) F,S. A rigorous 
introduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable. The complex plane, 
functions, Mobius transformations, the exponential and logarithmic functions, trig- 
onometric functions, infinite series, integration in the complex plane, Cauchy's theo- 
rem and its consequences. 

MA 612 Analytic Function Theory II. Prerequisite: MA 611. 3(3-0) F,S. A contin- 
uation of MA 611. Taylor and Laurent series, the residue theorem, the argument 
principle, harmonic functions and the Dirichlet problem, analytic continuation and 
the monodromy theorem, entire and meromorphic fiinctions, the Weierstrass product 
representation and the Mittag-Leffler partial fraction representation, special func- 
tions, conformal mapping and the Picard theorem. 



190 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MA 613 Techniques of Complex Analysis. Prerequisite: MA 513 or MA 611. 3 
(3-0) S. A course dealing with the applications of complex analysis to mathematical 
problems in physical science in the setting of the potential equation and other par- 
tial differential equations: contour integrals, special functions of mathematical phy- 
sics from the line integral point of view, solution of problems in potential theory, 
asymptotic methods including WKB, and Wiener-Hopf techniques. 

MA 615 Theory of Functions of a Real Variable. Prerequisite: MA 517. 3(3-0) S. 
Real functions, semicontinuity, upper and lower limits, sequences; Lebesgue mea- 
sure and integration, absolute continuity and differentiation. 

MA 617 (ST 617) Measure Theory and Advanced Probability. 3(3-0) F. (See sta- 
tistics, page 256.) 

MA 618 (ST 618) Measure Theory and Advanced Probability, 3(3-0) S. (See sta- 
tistics, page 256.) 

MA 619 (ST 619) Topics in Advanced Probability. 3(3-0) Sum. (See statistics, 
page 256.) 

MA 620 Modern Algebra I. Prerequisite: MA 521. 3(3-0) F. A study of groups, 
rings and modules. Elements of homology. Polynomials, Noetherian rings, Algebraic 
extensions, Galois Theory. 

MA 621 Modern Algebra II. Prerequisite: MA 620. 3(3-0) S. A study of linear 
maps, bilinear forms, representations, multilinear products, semisimplicity and the 
representation of finite groups. 

MA 622 Linear Transformations and Matrix Theory. Prerequisite: MA 405. 3(3-0) 
F. Vector spaces, linear transformation and matrices, minimal polynomials, elemen- 
tary divisors, canonical forms, quadratic forms, functions of matrices. 

MA 623 Theory of Matrices and Applications. Prerequisite: MA 622. 3(3-0) S. 
Generalized inverses, matrix equations, variational methods for eigenvalues, matrix 
norms, perturbation of linear systems, computational methods, applications to dif- 
ferential equations, Markov chains. 

MA 626 Algebraic Topology. Prerequisite: MA 605. 3(3-0) S. Simplicial and singu- 
lar homology and cohomology, the Eilenberg-Steenrod axioms, duality, cohomology 
operations; higher homotopy groups, Hurewicz homomorphisms. 

MA 628 General Topology. Prerequisite: MA 604. 3(3-0) F. Comparisons of topol- 
ogies on function spaces; Ascoli Theorems; Stone-Weierstrass Theorems; uniform 
spaces and completions; paracompactness and partitions of unity; an introduction to 
a special topic such as topological vector spaces or topological groups. 

MA 632 Operational Mathematics I. Prerequisite: MA 513 or MA 611. 3(3-0) F. 
Laplace transform with theory and application to ordinary and partial differential 
equations arising from problems in engineering and physics. 

MA 633 Operational Mathematics II. Prerequisite: MA 632. 3(3-0) S. Extended 
development of the Laplace and Fourier transforms and their application to the 
solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, integral equations and differ- 
ence equations; Z-transforms, other infinite and finite transforms and their applica- 
tions. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 191 



MA 634 Theory of Distributions. Prerequisite: MA 632 or consent of instructor. 3 
(3-0) F. Basic definitions and properties of testing functions and distributions in one 
or more variables, convergence and calculus of distributions, test functions of rapid 
descent and distributions of slow growth, convolution, Fourier transforms, applica- 
tions in the area of differential and difference equations, etc. 

MA 635 Numerical Analysis III. Prerequisites: MA 405, MA 528 (CSC 528). 3 
(3-0) S. Topics in advanced numerical analysis such as approximation and evalua- 
tion of functions, numerical solution of integral and other operator equations, and 
numerical solutions of boundary value problems for partial differential equations. 
Particular attention is given to procedures suitable for implementation on a digital 
computer, and the computer is used for the solution of selected problems. 

MA 637 Differentiable Manifolds. Prerequisites: MA 405, MA 521; Corequisite: 
MA 604. 3(3-0) F. An introduction to the topology and geometry of differentiable 
manifolds. Multilinear algebra, exterior differential forms, differentiable manifolds, 
theory of connexions, Riemannian manifolds. 

MA 641 Calculus of Variations and Theory of Optimal Control I. Prerequisites: 
MA 512 or MA 426, MA 532. 3(3-0) F. Normed linear function spaces and Frechet 
differential, theory of the first variation, theory of fields and Weierstrass' excess 
function, Hamilton-Jacobi theory and dynamic programming, terminal control prob- 
lems and the maximum principle. 

MA 642 Calculus of Variations and Theory of Optimal Control II. Prerequisite: 
MA 641. 3(3-0) S. The homogeneous problem, the general control problem of Mayer, 
isoperimetric problems, theory of the second variation, existence of extrema, direct 
methods of the calculus of variations. 

MA 647 Functional Analysis I. Prerequisite: MA 516. 3(3-0) F. Banach spaces; 
linear functionals; linear operators, uniform boundedness, open mapping and closed 
graph theorems; dual spaces; weak topologies. 

MA 648 Functional Analysis II. Prerequisite: MA 647. 3(3-0) S. Advanced topics 
in functional analysis such as linear topological spaces; Banach algebra, spectral 
theory and abstract measure theory and integration. 

MA 655 (PY 655) Qualitative Methods in Celestial Mechanics. Prerequisites: 
MA 532, MA 513. 3(3-0) F. Transformation theory in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian 
mechanics, singularities in N-body problem, regularization. Hill's equation, periodic 
orbits, fixed point methods, stability. 

MA 656 (PY 656) Perturbation Theory in Celestial Mechanics. Prerequisites: 
MA 555 (PY 555) or MA 532 and PY 503. 3(3-0) S. Hamilton-Jacobi equation; can- 
onical perturbation theory; resonance problems; adiabatic invariants, asymptotic 
properties. 

MA 661 Differential Geometry and Tensor Analysis I. Prerequisite: MA 426 or 
MA 512. 3(3-0) F. Concepts of classical and modern differential geometry presented 
from the point of view of tensor analysis and differential forms. Topics to include: 
theory of curves, tensor analysis and differential forms, intrinsic and extrinic geo- 
metry of surfaces, Riemannian geometry. 

MA 662 Differential Gewnetry and Tensor Analysis II. Prerequisite: MA 661. 3 
(3-0) S. Continuation of MA 661. 

MA 681 Special Topics in Real Analysis. 1-6. 



192 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

MA 682 Special Topics in Complex Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 683 Special Topics in Algebra. 1-6. 

MA 684 Special Topics in Combinatorial Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 685 Special Topics in Numerical Analysis. 1-6. 

MA 686 Special Topics in Topology. 1-6. 

MA 687 Special Topics in Geometry. 1-6. 

MA 688 Special Topics in Differential Equations. 1-6. 

MA 689 Special Topics in Applied Mathematics. 1-6. 

The subject matter in the special topics courses varies from year to year. The top- 
ics and instructors are announced well in advance by the department. 

MA 692 (IE 692, OR 692) Special Topics in Mathematical Programming. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. (See industrial engineering, page 174.) 

MA 699 Research. Credits Arranged. Individual research in mathematics. 



Mathematics and Science Education 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and connplete departmental description, see 
Education, page 120.) 



Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. F. Zorowski, Head 

Professor J. C. Wiluams III, Associate Head 

Professors: J. A. Bailey, R. F. Barrett, F. R. DeJarnette— Grad- 
uate Administrator, B. H. Garqa Jr., F. J. Hale, F. D. Hart, H. A. Hassan, 
R. B. Knight, M. N. Ozisik, J. N. Perkins, F. O. Smetana, J. K. Whitfield, 
J. WooDBURN; Professor Emeriti: N. W. Conner, J. S. Doouttle; Adjunct 
Professors: R. W. Graham, E. A Saibel, J. E. Sunderland; Associate Pro- 
fessors: E. M. Afify, C. J. Moore Jr., J. C. Mulligan, L. H. Royster; 
Adjunct Associate Professor: E. C. Yates Jr.; Assistant Professors: J. R. 
Bailey, J. A. Daggerhart Jr.; Adjunct Assistant Professor: G. L. Smith 

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering oflFers graduate 
study leading to the Master of Mechanical Engineering, Master of Science and 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 193 

Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Entrance to the various programs in the department 
is normally based upon a pertinent, accredited baccalaureate degree. 

Graduate study and research are available in the thermal sciences including 
classical and statistical thermodynamics, transport phenomenon, energy conversion, 
heat and mass transfer, and thermal pollution; in acoustical technology including 
acoustic radiation, industrial and community noise control, transportation noise, 
and hearing conservation; in gas dynamics including subsonic, transonic, superson- 
ic, and hypersonic aerodynamics, rarefied gasdynamics, plasmadynamics, aerother- 
mochemistry, and dynamics of viscous fluids; in the mechanical sciences including 
machine vibrations, mechanical transients, materials processing, photoelasticity 
and experimental stress analysis, transportation systems and vehicle safety, and air 
pollution control, in the aerospace sciences including flight vehicle design, inertial 
navigation, and all aspects of aerospace propulsion; and in mechanical design inclu- 
ding practical team effort experience in mechanical device and process design en- 
compassing problem selection, data collection, preliminary and detailed design, 
performance evaluation, and redesign. 

Extensive laboratory facilities are available in most of the above areas. These in- 
clude subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic wind tunnels; cryogenic and 
vacuum facilities; extensive vibration and acoustic laboratories including anechoic 
chambers, a large reverberation room and field test and analysis instrumentation; 
a fiber and composite mechanics laboratory, a materials processing laboratory, an 
experimental stress analysis and photoelasticity laboratory, a particulate collection 
laboratory, a spectrophotometry laboratory and a heat transfer laboratory. In addi- 
tion to these laboratories, the department operates a Graduate Systems Design Fa- 
cility for carrying out multidisciplinary design projects in a variety of societal prob- 
lem areas. These and other experimental facilities coupled with the availability of 
an IBM Model 370/165 computer provide graduate students with outstanding re- 
search tools. 

The objective of the department is to provide graduate education both in rigor- 
ous experimental and theoretical research training and practitioner oriented engi- 
neering design involving mission directed problem solving. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAE 401 Energy Conversion. Prerequisite: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MAE 402 Heat and Mass Transfer. Prerequisites: MAE 302, MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MAE 403 Air Conditioning. Prerequisite: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 404 Refrigeration. Prerequisite: MAE 302. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 405 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory IIL Prerequisite: MAE 306. 1(0-3) 
F. 

MAE 409 Particulate Control in Industrial Atmospheric Pollution. Prerequisite: 
MAE 301 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 



194 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



MAE 411 Mechanical Design I. Prerequisites: MAE 315, MAE 316. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 415 Mechanical Engineering Analysis. Prerequisites: MAE 302, MAE 315, 
MAE 316, EE 331. 3(3-0) F. 

M.\E 416 Mechanical Engineering Design. Prerequisite: MAE 415. 4(3-2) S. 

MAE 422 Direct Energy Conversion. Prerequisites: MAE 301, EE 202, or EE 
332. 3(3-0)S. 

MAE 431 Thermodynamics of Fluid Flow. Prerequisites: MA 301, MAE 302, EM 
303, or MAE 355. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 435 Principles of Automatic Control. Prerequisite: MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. 

MAE 462 Flight Vehicle Stability and Control. Prerequisite: MAE 361. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 467 Rocket Propulsion. Prerequisite: MAE 365. 3(3-0) F. 

MAE 471 (MAS 471) Undersea Vehicle Design. Prerequisite: MAE 355 or EM 
303. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 472 Aerospace Vehicle Structures II. Prerequisite: MAE 371. 4(3-3) F. 

MAE 474 Matrix Stress and Deformation Analysis. Prerequisite: MAE 316 or 

MAE 371 or EM 307 or EM 301. 3(3-0) S. 

MAE 479 Aerospace Vehicle Design. Prerequisites: MAE 356, MAE 462, MAE 
467, MAE 472, EE 332. 4(2-6) S. 

MAE 495 Technical Seminar in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. Prerequi- 
site: Senior standing. 1(1-0) F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MAE 501 Steam and Gas Turbines. Prerequisites: MAE 302, EM 303, or MAE 
355. 3(3-0) F,S. Fundamental analysis of the theory and design of turbomachinery 
flow passages; control and performance of turbomachinery; gas-turbine engine pro- 
cesses. 

MAE 507, 508 Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals. Prerequisite: MAE 
302. 3(3-0) F,S. The fundamentals common to internal combustion engine cycles of 
operation. The Otto engine: carburetion, fuel distribution, flame and spark timing, 
and altitude effects; the Diesel engine; injection knock, combustion, precombustion 
and scavenging as applied to reciprocating and rotary engines. 

MAE 510 Theory of Particulate Collection in Air Pollution Control. Prerequisite: 
MAE 409 or graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. Particulate matter is classified and its pro- 
perties are described. The motion of particles as applied to particulate collection is 
carefully analyzed. The elements of aerodynamic capture of particles are developed 
and applications in Alteration and liquid scrubbing are considered. Fundamentals of 
acoustical, electrostatic and thermal precipitation are introduced. Sampling techni- 
ques and instrumentation are also considered. 

MAE 513 Vibration and Noise Control. Prerequisite: MAE 315 or MAE 472. 3 
(2-3) F. This course will be devoted to a study of the nature and origin of vibration 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 195 



and noise in mechanical systems and design for their control. Considerations will 
include source reduction, isolation, transmission, damping and acoustic shielding 
techniques, through classroom discussions and laboratory demonstrations. 

MAE 515 Experimental Stress Analysis. Prerequisite: MAE 316. 3(2-3) F. Theo- 
retical and experimental techniques of strain and stress analysis with emphasis on 
electrical strain gages and instrumentation, brittle coatings, grid methods and an 
introduction to photoelasticity. Laboratory includes an investigation and complete 
report of a problem chosen by the student under the guidance of the instructor. 

MAE 516 Photoelasticity. Prerequisite: MAE 316. 3(2-3) S. Theory and experi- 
mental techniques of two- and three- dimensional photoelasticity including photo- 
elastic coatings, photoplasticity and an application of photoelastic methods to the 
solution of mechanical design problems. Laboratory includes an investigation and 
complete report of a problem chosen by the student under the guidance of the in- 
structor. 

MAE 517 Lubrication. Prerequisite: EM 303. 3(2-3) S. The theory of hydrodyna- 
mic lubrication; Reynold's equation, the Sommerfield integration, effect of variable 
lubricant properties and energy equation for temperature rise. Properties of lubri- 
cants. Application to design of bearings. Boundary lubrication. Solid film lubrica- 
tion. 

MAE 518 Acoustic Radiation L Prerequisite: MA 301. 3(3-0) F,S. Discussion of 
the principles of acoustic radiation as related to acoustic sources and their related 
fields. The radiation of single sources (point, plane, line cylinder, spheres, etc.) and 
combinations thereof are considered. 

MAE 521 Aerothermodynamics. Prerequisites: MAE 301, MAE 355 or EM 303. 3 

(3-0) F,S. Review of basic thermodynamics pertinent to gas dynamics. Detailed de- 
velopment of the general equations governing gas motion in both differential and in- 
tegral form. Simplification of the equations to those for specialized flow regimes. 
Similarity parameters. Applications to simple problems in various flow regimes. 

MAE 531 Plasmagasdynamics I. Prerequisites: MAE 356, PY 414. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Study of basic laws governing plasma motion for dense and rarefied plasmas, hydro- 
magnetic shocks, plasma waves and instabilities, simple engineering applications. 

MAE 532 Plasmagasdynamics II. Prerequisite: MAE 531. 3(3-0) F,S. Quantum 
statistics and ionization phenomena. Charged particle interactions. Transport pro- 
perties in the presence of electric and magnetic fields and nonequilibrium ionization. 

MAE 535 (EE 535) Gas Lasers. Prerequisites: MAE 356 or equivalent, PY 407. 
3(3-0) F,S. Study of the principles, design and potential applications of ion, molecu- 
lar, chemical and atomic gas lasers. 

MAE 541, 542 Aerodynamic Heating. Prerequisites: MA 511, MAE 521. 3(3-0) F, 
S. A detailed study of the latest theoretical and experimental findings of the com- 
pressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers with special attention to the areo- 
dynamic heating problem. Application of theory in the analysis and design of aero- 
space hardware. 

MAE 543 Heat Transfer — Theory and Applications. Prerequisite: MAE 402 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Development of basic equations for steady and transient heat 
and mass transfer processes. Emphasis is placed on the application of the basic 
equations to engineering problems in the areas of conduction, convection, mass 
transfer and thermal radiation. 



196 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



MAE 545, 546 Project Work in Mechanical Engineering I, II. 2(0-4) F,S. Indivi- 
dual or small group investigation of a problem stemming from a mutual student -fa- 
culty interest. Emphasis is placed on providing a situation for exploiting student 
curiosity. 

MAE 550 Cryogenics I. Prerequisite: MAE 402. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the thermo- 
dynamic processes required to produce cryogenic fluids. Properties of materials at 
cryogenic temperatures. Insulation of cryogenic vessels and lines. Design of cryo- 
genic systems. 

MAE 554 Advanced Aerodynamic Theory. Prerequisite: MAE 355. 3(3-0) S. Devel- 
opment of fundamental aerodynamic theory. Emphasis upon mathematical analysis 
and derivation of equations of motion, airfoil theory and comparison with experi- 
mental results. Introduction to supersonic flow theory. 

MAE 555 Advanced Flight Vehicle Stability and Control. Prerequisite: MAE 462. 
3(3-0) F. Preliminary analysis and design of flight control systems to include auto- 
pilots and stability augmentation systems. Study of effects of inertial cross-coupling 
and nonrigid bodies on vehicle dynamics. 

MAE 562 Advanced Aircraft Structures. Prerequisite: MAE 371. 3(3-0) S. Devel- 
opment of methods of stress analysis for aircraft structures, special problems in 
structural design, stiffened panels, rigid frames, indeterminate structures, general 
relaxation theory. 

MAE 571 Inertial Guidance, Design and Analysis. Prerequisites: MA 401, MAE 
435 or MAE 462. 3(3-0) S. Engineering design and performance analysis of inertial 
guidance components, subsystems and systems. Development of transfer functions 
and application of linear system techniques to determine stability, transient re- 
sponse and steady-state errors of gyros, accelerometers, stable platforms and initial 
alignment subsystems. Error analysis and its significance. Preliminary design and 
analysis of tjrpical inertial guidance systems for flight and marine vehicles. 

MAE 581, 582 Hypersonic Aerodynamics. Prerequisites: MA 512, MAE 521 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. A detailed study of the latest theoretical and experimental 
findings in hypersonic aerodynamics. 

MAE 593 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite: Advanced 
undergraduate or graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Faculty and student discussions of 
special topics in mechanical engineering. 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MAE 601 Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics. Prerequisites: MAE 302; MA 
401 or MA 511. 3(3-0) F. Thermodynamics of a general reactive system; conserva- 
tion of energy and the principles of increase of entropy; the fundamental relation of 
thermodynamics; Legendre transformations; equilibrium and stability criteria in 
different representations; general relations; chemical thermodynamics; multireac- 
tion system; ionization; irreversible thermodynamics; the Onsager relation; appli- 
cations to thermoelectric, thermomagnetic and dififusional processes. 

MAE 602 Statistical Thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MAE 601. 3(3-0) S. Funda- 
mental principles of kinetic theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics and 
irreversible phenomena with particular reference to thermodynamics systems and 
processes. The conclusions of the classical thermodynamics are analyzed and estab- 
lished from the microscopic viewpoint. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 197 



MAE 603 Advanced Power Plants. Prerequisite: MAE 401. 3(3-0) F. A critical 
analysis of the energy balance of thermal power plants, thermodynamics and econo- 
mic evaluation of alternate schemes of development; study of recent developments in 
the production of power. 

MAE 605 Aerothermochemistry. Prerequisites: MA 511, MAE 601 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) S. A generalized treatment of combustion thermodynamics including deriva- 
tion of thermodynamic quantities by the method of Jacobians, criteria for thermo- 
dynamic equilibrium, computation of equilibrium composition and adiabatic flame 
temperature. Introduction to classical chemical kinetics. Conservation equations for 
a reacting system, detonation and deflagration. Theories of flame propagation, flame 
stabilization and turbulent combustion. 

MAE 606 Advanced Gas Dynamics. Prerequisites: MA 511, MAE 521, MAE 601. 
3(3-0) S. The general conservation equations of gas dynamics from a dififerential 
and integral point of view. Hyperbolic compressible flow equations, unsteady one- 
dimensional flows, the nonlinear problem of shock wave formation, isentropic flow, 
flow in nozzles and jets, turbulent flow. 

MAE 608 Advanced Heat Transfer I. Prerequisites: MA 512, MAE 402. 3(3-0) F. 
A generalized treatment of th^ methods of solution of transient and steady heat 
conduction in finite and infinite regions involving internal heat generation. Ap- 
proximate methods and similarity transformation in the solution of heat con- 
duction problems involving change of phase, variable thermal properties and non- 
linear thermal radiation boundary conditions. Heat conduction in multilayer regions 
and in anisotropic solids. Solutions with numerical methods. 

MAE 609 Advanced Heat Transfer II. Prerequisite: MAE 608. 3(3-0) S. Advanced 
topics in steady and transient natural and forced convection heat transfer for 
laminar and turbulent flow of imcompressible fluid through conduits and over 
bodies. Problems involving variable properties and interaction with thermal 
radiation. Mass transfer in laminar and turbulent flow; simultaneous heat and 
mass transfer. 

MAE 610 Advanced Topics in Heat Transfer. Prerequisite: MAE 609. 3(3-0) S. 
This course constitutes a study of recent developments in heat transfer and related 
areas. It is anticipated that the course content will change from semester to 
semester. 

MAE 611, 612 Advanced Machine Design I, II. Prerequisite: MAE 416. 3(3-0) F,S. 
An advanced integrated treatment of stress analysis and materials engineering 
devoted to current rational methods of analysis and design applicable to mechanical 
components. Primary attention placed on the determination and prediction of 
strength, life and deformation characteristics of machine components as dictated 
by performance requirements. 

MAE 613 Mechanics of Machinery. Prerequisites: MAE 315, MA 512. 3(3-0) F. 
Advanced applications of dynamics to the design and response analysis of dynamic 
behavior of machines and mechanical devices. Emphasis on developing competence 
in transforming real problems in dynamics into appropriate mathematical models 
whose analysis permits performance predictions of engineering value. 

MAE 614 Mechanical Transients and Machine Vibrations. Prerequisites: MAE 
315 or EM 555; MA 512. 3(3-0) S. A study of the forces and motions produced in 
mechanical systems by periodic and transient inputs including shock and impact 
loading. Particular attention devoted to the application of the principles of vibration 
theory to problems encountered in mechanical design. 



198 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



MAE 615 Aeroelasticity I. Prerequisites: MA 511; MAE 411 or MAE 472, MAE 
521. 3(3-0) F. Deformations of aerostructures under static and dynamic loads, natur- 
al mode shapes and frequencies; two- and three-dimensional incompressible flow, 
wings and bodies in unsteady flow; static aeroelastic phenomena. 

MAE 617 Mechanical Systems Design Analysis. Prerequisites: MAE 611, MAE 
613. 3(3-0) F. Lecture and project activity devoted to development of the ability to 
apply knowledge and experience in performing comprehensive design analysis of 
complete mechanical systems. Areas of interest to include critical problem recog- 
nition, system modeling, performance determination, and optimization and 
reliability evaluation. 

MAE 618 Mechanical System Design Synthesis. Prerequisite: MAE 617. 3(3-0) S. 
Application of the basic philosophy and methodology of the complete design process 
to advanced mechanical system design. Individual and group experience in the 
conception, synthesis, analysis, optimization and implementation phases of feasi- 
bility, preliminary and final design studies provided by means of comprehensive 
system design projects. 

MAE 619 Random Vibration. Prerequisite: MAE 614. 3(3-0) For S. Mathematical 
description of stochastic processes. The stationary and ergodic assumptions and 
response analysis of mechanical systems to random excitation. Simulation of and 
failure due to random environments. 

MAE 622 Acoustic Radiation IL Prerequisite: MAE 518. 3(3-0) F or S. Intro- 
duction to the various numerical methods for determining near-and-far-field pres- 
sures for arbitrary shaped bodies. The methods of Chertock, Hess, Copley, Schenck 
and Pachner are considered. 

MAE 625, 626 Direct Energy Conversion. Prerequisite: MAE 601. 3(3-0) F,S. 
An engineering study of the modern developments in the field of conversion of heat 
to power in order to meet new technology demands. Thermoelectric, thermomagnetic, 
thermionic, photovoltaic and magneto-hydrodynamic effects and their utilization 
for energy conversion purposes, static and dynamic response, limitations imposed 
by the first and the second laws of thermodynamics. Energy and entropy balances, 
irreversible sources, inherent losses, cascading, design procedures, experimental 
studies to determine the response and efficiency of various systems. 

MAE 631 Applications of Ultrasonics to Engineering Research. Prerequisites: 
EE 332, MA 511. 3(3-0) F. The technique and theory of propagation of ultrasonics 
in liquids, gases and solids. Development of ultrasonic transducers, the elastic 
piezoelectric and dielectric relationships. Ultrasonic applications of asdic or sonar 
cavitation, emulsification, soldering, welding and acoustic properties of gases, 
liquids and solids. 

MAE 651 Principles of Fluid Motion. Prerequisite: MAE 554; Corequisite: MA 
511. 3(3-0) F. Fundamental principles of fluid dynamics. Mathematical methods of 
analysis are emphasized. Potential flow theory development with introduction to 
the effects of viscosity and compressibility. Two-dimensional and three-dimensional 
phenomena are considered. 

MAE 652 Dynamics of Compressible Flow. Prerequisites: MA 511, MAE 521. 3 
(3-0) F. Properties of compressible fluids, equation of motion in one-dimensional mo- 
tion, channel flows, shock wave theory, methods of observation and flows at transon- 
ic speeds. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 199 



MAE 653 Supersonic Aerodynamics. Prerequisite: MAE 521. 3(3-0) S. Equations 
of motion in supersonic flow, Prandtl-M eyer turns, method of characteristics, 
hodograph plane, supersonic wind tunnels, supersonic airfoil theory and boundary 
layer shock interaction. 

MAE 654 Dynamics of Viscous Fluids I. Prerequisite: MAE 521. 3(3-0) F. Exact 
solutions to the Navier-Stokes Equations. Approximate solutions for low Reynolds 
numbers. Approximate solutions for high Reynolds numbers — incompressible 
boundary layer theory. Laminar and turbulent boundary layers in theory and 
experiment. Flow separation. 

MAE 655 Dynamics of Viscous Fluids IL Prerequisite: MAE 654. 3(3-0) S. A 
continuation of MAE 654. Compressible laminar and turbulent boundary layers. 
Laminar and turbulent jets. The stability of laminar boundary layers with respect 
to small disturbances, transition from laminar to turbulent flow. 

MAE 657 Measurement in Rarefied Gas Streams. Prerequisite: MAE 602. 3(3-0) 
F. A study of the basis for measurement of flow properties in rarefied gas streams. 
Included will be ionization gauges, hot wire anemometers and temperature probes, 
pitot and static tubes, Langmuir probes, electron scattering and electron beam 
density gauges. 

MAE 658, 659 Molecular Gas Dynamics. Prerequisites: MAE 521, MAE 602. 
3(3-0) F,S. Statistical mechanics as applied to the derivation of the equations of 
gasdynamics from the microscopic viewpoint. Energy levels of atoms and molecules 
and their relation to equilibrium thermodynamic concepts, in particular, specific 
heats. Approximate solutions of the Boltzmann Equation. Treatments of viscosity, 
heat conduction and electrical conductivity. Collision processes. High -temperature 
behavior of multi-species gas mixtures. 

MAE 661, 662 Aerospace Energy Systems. Prerequisites: MA 512, MAE 521, 
PY 407 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of energy systems appropriate to the 
varied requirements of space operations. Includes analysis of chemical, nuclear 
and solar energy sources and the theory of their adaptation to operational require- 
ments for propulsion and auxiliary power, cooling requirements, coolants and 
materials. 

MAE 663 (TX 663) Mechanics of Twisted Structures. 3(3-0) F. (See textile 
technology, page 265.) 

MAE 664 (TX 664) Mechanics of Fabric Structures. 3(3-0) S. (See textile techno- 
logy, page 265.) 

MAE 671, 672 Advanced .\ir Conditioning Design I, II. Prerequisites: MAE 
403, MAE 404. 3(3-0) F,S. The design of heating and air-conditioning systems; the 
preparation of specifications and performance tests on heating and air-conditioning 
equipment. 

MAE 674, 675 Advanced Spacecraft Design. Prerequisites: MAE 542, MAE 582. 
3(3-0) F,S. Analysis and design of spacecraft including system design criteria, 
acceleration tolerance, entry environment, thermal requirements, criteria for con- 
figuration design, aerodynamic design, heating rates, thermostructural design, 
boost phase, de-orbit, entry corridor, lift modulation, rolling entry, glide phase, 
maneuvering and landing, stability and control, thermal protection system, mate- 
rials, instrumentation and life-support systems. 



200 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



MAE 681 Introduction to Rocket Propulsion. Prerequisite: MAE 601. 3(3-0) F. 
Review of the exterior ballistics and performance of rocket -propelled vehicles. 
Thermodynamics of real gases at high temperature. Nonequilibrium flow in rocket 
nozzles. 

MAE 682 Solid Propellant Rockets. Prerequisite: MAE 681. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
the design and performance of solid-propellant rockets; properties and burning 
characteristics of solid propellants. Internal ballistics of solid-propellant rockets. 
Design and design optimization. Combustion instabilities. 

MAE 683 Liquid Propellant Rockets. Prerequisite: MAE 681. 3(3-0) S. The study 
and design of liquid-propellant rockets. Combustion of liquid fuels. Thrust chamber, 
propellant supply and injection system. Cooling of rocket motors. Low- and high- 
frequency instability in liquid rocket motors. Scaling laws. 

MAE 684 Ion Propulsion. Prerequisite: MAE 531. 3(3-0) F or S. Study and design 
of ion motors, power sources and converters. Missions for ion-propelled vehicles. 

MAE 693 Advanced Topics in Mechanical Engineering. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 1-6 F or S. Faculty and graduate student discussions of advanced topics 
in contemporary mechanical engineering. 

MAE 695 Mechanical Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F or S. Faculty and graduate 
student discussions centered around current research problems and advanced engi- 
neering theories. 

MAE 699 Mechanical Engineering Research. Prerequisites: Graduate standing 
in mechanical engineering, consent of advisei*. Credits Arranged. Individual re- 
search in the field of mechanical engineering. 



Meteorology 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental infomnation, see geosciences, 
page 162.) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 



MY 411 Introductory Meteorology. Prerequisites: PY 208 or PY 212; MA 201 or 
MA 212. 3(3-0) F. 

MY 412 Atmospheric Physics. Prerequisite: MY 411 or consent of instructor. 
3(3-0) S. 

MY 421 Atmospheric Statics and Thermodynamics. Prerequisites: PY 208 or PY 
212; MA 202. 3(3-0) F. 

MY 422 Atmospheric Kinematics and Dynamics. Prerequisites: PY 207 or PY 
208; MA 202; Corequisite: MY 421 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. 

MY 435 Measurements and Data Systems. Prerequisite: MY 421. 3(2-3) S. 

MY 441 Meteorological Analysis I. Prerequisites: MY 422, MY 435. 3(3-0) F. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 201 



MY 443 Meteorological Laboratory I. Prerequisite: MY 435; Corequisite: MY 
441. 4(0-10) F. 

MY 444 Meteorological Laboratory IL Prerequisite: MY 443. 4(0-10) S. 

MY 486 Weather and Climate. Prerequisites: MA 102 or MA 112, PY 211-212 or 
PY 221. 2(2-0) F. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MY 512 Micrometeorology. Prerequisite: MY 422. 3(3-0) F. Meteorology of the 
lowest hundred meters of the atmosphere with emphasis on the transport of mo- 
mentum, heat, water vapor, and effluents and their transfer through the earth's 
surface. Weber 

MY 521 The Upper Atmosphere. Prerequisite: MY 411 or consent of instructor. 
3(3-0) S. Meteorological conditions in the upper atmosphere from the stratosphere 
to the ionosphere. Compositions, mean distributions and variabilities, and circulation 
and transport properties in the region. Physical theories. Watson 

MY 555 Meteorology of the Biosphere. Prerequisites: PY 205 or PY 211, CH 103 
or CH 107; MA 102 or MA 112. 3(3-0) F. A course designed for graduate students 
in the life sciences, presenting the physical principles governing the states and 
processes of the atmosphere in contact with earth's surface of land, water and life. 
Exchanges of heat, mass and momentum are analyzed for various conditions of the 
atmosphere and surface, and as a function of season, time and geographic location. 

Graduate Staff 

MY 556 Air Pollution Meteorology. Prerequisite: MY 555 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 
The meteorological aspects of air pollution, especially for nonmeteorologists engaged 
in graduate training for work involving air pollution. Peterson 

MY 593 Advanced Topics. Prerequisite: Consent of staff. 1-6 F,S. Special topics 
of advanced nature in the field of meteorology, provided to groups or assigned to 
individual students. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MY 612 Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Prerequisite: MY 412. 3(3-0) S. The 
study of solar and terrestrial radiation. Methods of actinometric measurements, 
radiation absorption in the atmosphere, scattering of radiation, the solar spectrum, 
infrared radiative transfer and methods of determining net radiation. Satellite 
measurement of radiation and determination of atmospheric properties from satellite 
measurements. Weber 

MY 627 Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion. Prerequisite: MY 422. 3(3-0) F. 
Mechanics of turbulence in the atmosphere, spectra and scales of atmospheric 
turbulence, and magnitudes of turbulent fluctuations. Theories of diffusion in the 
atmosphere. Diffusion and transport experiments. Processes other than natural 
turbulence affecting concentration of effluents. Weber 

MY 635 Dynamical Analysis of the Atmosphere. Prerequisites: MY 441, MY 443. 
3(2-3) F. Theory and analysis of circulation and weather systems based on dynamical 
concepts; structure, movement and development of systems; evaluation of theoretical 
concepts in prognosis and forecasting. Saucier 



202 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



MY 695 Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1(1-0) F,S- Presentation of 
scientific articles and special lectures. Each student is required to present or 
critically review one or more papers. Graduate Staff 

MY 699 Research. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of advisory 
committee. Credit Arranged F,S. Graduate research in fulfillment of requirements 
for a graduate degree. Graduate Staff 



Microbiology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor J. B. Evans, Head 

Professors: W. J. Dobrogosz, G. H. Elkan, P. B. Hamilton, J. J. Perry; Adjunct 
Associate Professor: J. J. Tuus; Assistant Professor: E. C. Hayes HI; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: P. H. Ray 

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Professors: F. B. Armstrong, J. G. Lecce, M. L. Speck; Professor USD A: J. L. 
Etchells; Associate Professors: W. E. Kloos, J. J. McNeill, A. G. Wollum 

The Department of Microbiology offers programs leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. These are research oriented programs 
that require a dissertation based on personal research. For students wishing a more 
general education without the thesis requirement, the Master of Life Science degiee 
is offered with an emphasis in microbiology. 

Applicants should have a bachelor's degree in one of the biological or physical 
sciences including at least one course in microbiology and courses in organic 
chemistry and calculus. Deficiencies may be made up while in graduate school but 
will not be counted as credit toward a graduate degree. 

There are no specific departmental requirements regarding courses of study. 
There is a core of basic courses in microbiology that will be in the programs of most 
graduate students who have not had equivalent courses previously. As many as 
half of the courses in most programs will be basic courses in related areas such as 
biochemistry, chemistry, genetics, or cell biology. 

At least one semester of half-time teaching experience is required of all Ph.D. 
candidates. All graduate students are expected to attend and participate in the 
seminar program every semester they are in residence. As a general rule the M.S. 
program requires two full years (including summers) beyond the B.S. level and 
the Ph.D. program requires two or three full years beyond the M.S. level. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MB 401 General Microbiology. Prerequisites: BS 100, CH 223 or CH 220. 4(3-3) S. 
Credit will not be granted for both MB 301 and MB 401. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 203 



MB 405 (FS 405) Food Microbiology. 3(2-3) F. (See food science, page 152.) 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

MB 501 Advanced Microbiology. Prerequisite: MB 401. 4(3-2) F. A study in some 
depth of microbial structure and function, microbial ecology and characterization of 
important groups of microorganisms. Perry 

MB 506 (FS 506) Advanced Food Microbiology. 3(1-6) S. (See food science, page 
152.) 

MB 507 (PP 507) Pathogenic Microbiology. Prerequisite: MB 401. 4(3-2) F. A 
study of pathogenic microorganisms and their interaction with susceptible hosts. 
Emphasis will be on the principles and processes of infection and immunity as they 
relate to common diseases of man, plants, and animals. Hayes 

MB 514 Microbial Metabolism. Prerequisites: MB 301 or MB 401, BCH 351 or 
BCH 551. 3(3-0) S. A study of the physiology and metabolism of microorganisms 
and their regulatory mechanisms. Dobrogosz 

MB 521 Microbial Ecology. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 1(1-0) S. 
A survey of the ecological role of microorganisms in our environment, their inter- 
action with other living organisms and their function in biodegradation and recycling 
of organic matter in the ecosystem. Perry 

MB 532 (SSC 532) Soil Microbiology. 3(3^0) S. (See soil science, page 250.) 

MB 551 Immunology and Serology. Prerequisite: MB 401. 2(1-2) S. Astudy of the 
basic concepts and principles of antibody production, antigen-antibody interaction, 
and the laboratory techniques for their demonstration and study. Lecce 

MB 555 (ZO 555) Protozoology. 4(2-6) S. (See zoology, page 278.) 

MB 561 (BCH 561, GN 561) Biochemical and Microbial Genetics. 3(3-0) S. (See 
biochemistry, page 74.) 

MB 570 (BAE 570, CE 570) Sanitary Microbiology. 3(2-3) S. (See biological 
and agricultural engineering, page 77.) 

MB 571 Virology. Prerequisites: BCH 551, MB 401. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to 
the fundamental aspects of virus-cell interactions. These include virus attachment 
and penetration, intracellular virus replication, metabolic changes occurring in 
cells as a result of virus infection and virus-induced cellular transformations. 

Hayes 

MB 574 (BO 574) Phycology. 3(1-4) S. (See botany, page 83.) 

MB 575 (BO 575, PP 575) The Fungi. 3(3-0) F. (See botany, page 83.) 

MB 576 (BO 576, PP 576) The Fungi— Lab. 1(0-3) F. (See botany, page 83.) 

MB 590 Topical Problems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent of instructor. 
Credits Arranged F,S. Graduate Staff 



204 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

MB 632 (SSC 632) Ecology and Functions of Soil Microorganisms. 3(3-0) S. (See 
soil science, page 251.) 

MB 690 Microbiology Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

MB 692 Special Problems in Microbiology. Credits Arranged F,S. 

Graduate Staff 

MB 699 Microbiology Research. Credits Arranged F,S. Graduate Staff 



Modern Languages 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor A. A. Gonzalez, Head 

Professors: G. W. Poland, E. M. Stack; Associate Professors: Mary Paschal — 
Assistant Head: E. W. Rollins, H. Tucker Jr. 

The Department of Modern Languages offers courses to assist graduate students 
in preparing themselves to use modern foreign languages in research and advanced 
study. Students are encouraged particularly to seek useful foreign research related 
to their thesis or other research in progress. 

Certification may be obtained in languages not noiTnally taught by the depart- 
ment with special pennission of the Graduate School. 



*MLF 401 French for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. Development of basic vocabu- 
lary, knowledge of structures and translation techniques necessary to a reading 
skill. This course is provided to assist graduate students to prepare for the foreign 
language reading certification. It does not provide instruction in original compo- 
sition or in speaking. Students will be certified in the language after successfully 
passing the final examination. (No prerequisite.) 

*MLG 401 German for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. This course seeks to teach 
the structures and patterns of the language as used in technical and scholarly 
writing, with emphasis on the acquisition of a basic vocabulary. Examples will be 
drawn fi-om a variety of sources to reflect the interest of all students. Completion 
of the course, including the final examination, will certify the student in the 
language. (No prerequisite.) 

*MLS 401 Spanish for Graduate Students. 3(3-0) F. A course designed to teach 
students to read Spanish as used in scholarly and technical writing. Material will 
be drawn from various sources reflecting student interest. Students completing the 
course, including the final examination, will be certified in the language. (No 
prerequisite.) 

* These courses do not carry graduate langua^ credit. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 205 

Nuclear Engineering 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. L. Murray, Head 

Professors: J. R. Beeler Jr., T. S. Elleman, R. P. Gardner, R. F. Saxe, L. R. 
Zumwalt; Associate Professors: J. R. Bohannon Jr., C. E. Si ewert— Graduate 
Administrator, E. Stam, K. Verghese 

The discipline of Nuclear Engineering is dedicated to the development of 
nuclear processes for energy needs and to the application of radiation for the 
benefit of society. The Department of Nuclear Engineering ofiFers graduate study 
oriented toward careers related to the problems of energy and of the environment, 
providing courses and research leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees. 

Topics of investigation include nuclear reactor safety, environmental aspects of 
nuclear energy, radiation detection and measurement, nuclear reac-tor theory, 
analysis, and design, properties of nuclear materials, economic power from nuclear 
reactors, and applications of radioisotopes and radiation in industry, medicine, and 
science. 

The new one-megawatt PULSTAR reactor, which became operational in 1973, 
is similar in design, type of fuel, and performance to modem power reactors. It is 
used for teaching, research, and service in behalf of the university. Also available 
for student use in research are a 30,000 curie cobalt-60 gamma irradiation source, 
an IBM System 370 Model 165 computer, and a number of well-equipped labora- 
tories. 

Bachelor's degree graduates in any of the fields of engineering or physical 
sciences are usually qualified for successful advanced study in nuclear engineering. 
Prior experience or course work in nuclear physics, differential equations and 
basic reactor analysis is helpful, but may be gained during the first semester of 
graduate study. 

Opportunities are available for graduate co-op work with utility companies and 
reactor manufacturers in the Raleigh area, providing a valuable combination of 
financial support and learning in the classroom, the research laboratorv' and on the 
job. Teaching and research assistantships are available for qualified applicants. 
Part-time work is available for graduate students with reactor operations and the 
activation analysis and radioisotope production laboratories. 

Thirty semester hours, including four for research on a thesis, are required for 
the M.S. degree. Students may also work directly toward a Ph.D. degree. Inter- 
disciplinary programs with other departments in the School of Engineering are 
available. 

The advent of competitive nuclear power and the ever-increasing need for 
reliable clean energy has created a strong demand for nuclear engineers to partici- 
pate in all phases of the nuclear power field— environmental studies, siting, design, 
construction, testing, operation, licensing, and evaluation. Graduates of the depart- 
ment find positions in industry, government and educational institutions, working 



206 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



with reactors in the several categories — light water, gas-cooled, fast breeder and 
fusion. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NE 401 Reactor Analysis and Design. Corequisite: NE 302 or NE 419. 4(3-2) F. 

NE 402 Reactor Engineering. Corequisite: NE 401. 4(3-2) S. 

NE 403 Nuclear Engineering Design Projects. Prerequisite: NE 402. 2(1-3) S. 

NE 419 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering. Prerequisite: PY 202 or PY 208. 
3(3-0) F,S. 

NE 491, 492 Nuclear Engineering Topics I and II. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 1-4 S. Typical offerings include: 

NE U91A Radiation Applications. Gardner 

NE A91B Nuclear Fuel Cycles and Isotope Production. Verghese 

NE U92A Reactor Systems. Saxe 

NE A92B Radiological and Reactor Safety. Elleman 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NE 501 Reactor Analysis. Prerequisite: NE 302 or NE 419. 3(3-0) F. Provides a 
background on the principles of neutron motion in matter with emphasis on the 
analysis of the nuclear chain reactor. A discussion of neutron mechanics, flux dis- 
tributions, critical mass calculations, time behavior, two group models, and re- 
activity calculation is presented for the fission reactor. Siewert 

NE 502 Reactor Design. Prerequisite: NE 501. 3(3-0) S. Elements of nuclear 
reactor design and operation, including reactor materials, thermal and hydraulic 
analysis, control and safety, and thermal and fast reactor system. Saxe 

NE 504 (MA 504) Mathematical Methods in Engineering. Prerequisite: MA 
301 or 312. 3(3-0) F. Survey of mathematical methods for engineers. Topics include 
ordinary differential equations, matrices, partial differential equations, difference 
equations, numerical methods, elements of statistics. Techniques and applications 
to engineering are stressed. 

NE 505 Experimental Methods in Nuclear Engineering. Prerequisites: NE 501 
and NE(PY) 511. Corequisites: NE 502 and NE 512. 3(1-4) S. Laboratory experi- 
ments are performed to illustrate the principles and concepts covered in NE 501, 
NE 502, NE 511 and NE 512. Gardner 

NE 511 (PY 511) Nuclear Physics for Engineers. Prerequisite: PY 410. 3(3-0) F. 
A study of the properties of atomic nuclei, of nuclear radiations and of the inter- 
action of nuclear radiation with matter. Emphasis is placed on the principles of 
modern equipment and techniques of nuclear measurement and their application 
to practical problems. Waltner 

NE 512 Radiation Applications. Prerequisite: NE 511 (PY 511). 3(3-0) S. Applica- 
tions of radiation interaction principles to practical nuclear problems. Topics 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 207 



include radiolo^cal safety, effects of radiation on biological and structural mate- 
rials, and industrial applications of radioisotopes and radiation. Elleman 

NE 562 (MAT 562) Materials Problems in Nuclear Engineering. Prerequisite: 
PY 410 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. Reactor component design considerations 
determined by materials properties as well as by nuclear function are covered. 
Emphasis is placed on radiation effects and other concepts pertinent to the selection 
of materials for nuclear reactors for either terrestrial or space applications. 

Fahmy 

NE 573 (MAT 573) Computer Experiments in Materials Engineering. 3(3-0) F. 
(See materials engineering, page 183.) 

NE 574 (CE 574) Environmental Consequences of Nuclear Power. Prerequisite: 
Consent of instructor(s). 3(3-0) S. Evaluation of environmental consequences result- 
ing from electrical power generation, with emphasis on siting, construction, and 
operation of nuclear power plants. Topics include: growth in electrical demand, 
alternative sources of power and their environmental aspects; fuel reprocessing; 
sources and treatment of solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes; sources and effects of 
waste heat; federal and state regulations, including Environmental Impact State- 
ments. Kohl, Zumwalt, Smallwood 

NE 591, 592 Special Topics in Nuclear Engineering I, II. Prerequisite: Per- 
mission of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S. Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NE 601 Reactor Theory and Analysis. Prerequisite: NE 501. 3(3-0) F. Theoretical 
aspects of neutron diffusion and transport related to the design computation and 
performance analysis of nuclear reactors. Principal topics are a unified view of 
the neutron cycle including slowing, resonance capture and thermalization; reactor 
dynamics and control; fuel cycle studies; and neutron transport methods. Back- 
ground is provided for research in power and test reactor analysis. Murray 

NE 602 Advanced Reactor Theory. Prerequisite: NE 601. 3(3-0) S. A complete 
presentation of the singular eigenfunction expansion technique as applied in 
neutron transport theory for the analysis of nuclear reactors and to radiative heat 
transfer problems for participating media. Siewert 

NE 611 Radiation Detection. Prerequisite: NE 512. 3(2-2) F. Covers the advanced 
aspects of radiation detection such as computer methods applied to gamma-ray 
spectroscopy, absolute detector efficiencies by experimental and Monte Carlo 
techniques, the use and theory of solid state detectors, time-of-flight detection 
experiments, and Mossbauer and other resonance phenomena. Gardner 

NE 620 Nuclear Radiation Attenuation. Prerequisite: NE 502. 3(3-0) F. The 
physical theory and mathematical analysis of the penetration of neutrons, gamma- 
rays and charged particles. Analytical techniques include point kernels, transport 
theory, Monte Carlo and numerical methods. Digital computers are employed in 
the solution of practical problems. Staff 

NE 621 Radiation Effects on Materials. Prerequisite: NE 512. 3(3-0) F. Inter- 
actions of radiation with matter, with emphasis on the physical effects. Current 
theories and experimental techniques are discussed. Annealing of defects, radiation 
induced changes in physical properties, and effects in reactor materials are dis- 
cussed. Elleman 



208 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



NE 622 Transport of Matter in Nuclear Reactors. Prerequisite: NE 512. 3(3-0) S. 
Mechanisms of fission product migration in reactor solids and fluids. Emphasis is on 
absorption phenomena, thermodynamics of reversible processes, diffusion mathema- 
tics and experimental methods. Zumwalt 

NE 631 Reactor Kinetics and Control. Prerequisite: NE 501. 3(3-0) S. A study of 
the control of nuclear reactor systems. Basic control theory is developed including 
the use of Bode, Nyquist, and S-plane diagrams, and state-variable methods. Reac- 
tor and reactor systems are analyzed by these methods and control methods and op- 
timum-control methods are developed. Models for reactors and reactor-associated 
units, such as heat exchangers, are discussed. The effects of non-linearities are pre- 
sented. Saxe 

NE 641 Radioisotope Applications. Prerequisite: NE 511 (PY 511). 3(3-0) S. Prin- 
ciples and techniques of radioisotope applications are presented. Topics include ra- 
diotracer principles, radiotracer applications to engineering processes, radioisotope 
gauging principles and charged particle, gamma ray and neutron radioisotope 
gauges. Gardner 

NE 653 Nuclear Reactor Design. Prerequisite: NE 601. 3(3-0) F. A comprehensive 
analysis and design of a nuclear system or facility suggested and advised on by de- 
partment faculty will be performed. The class is organized under the project engi- 
neering scheme, with work taking the form of feasibility study, and conceptual, pre- 
liminary or parametric analysis and design. Interdisciplinary topics such as siting, 
safety analysis, shielding, engineered safety features, protection systems, economics, 
material selection, quality assurance and project management are key parts of the 
course. Results are reviewed by an interdepartmental board. Bohannon 

NE 691, 692 Advanced Topics in Nuclear Engineering I, II. Prerequisite: Consent 

of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of recent developments in nuclear engineering the- 
ory and practice. Staff 

NE 695 Seminar in Nuclear Eng^ineering. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of selected topics 
in nuclear eng:ineering. Staff 

NE 699 Research in Nuclear Engfineering. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Cre- 
dits Arranged. Individual research in the field of nuclear engineering. Staff 



Nutrition 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: L. W. Aurand, E. R. Barrick, A. J. Clawson, Eloise S. Cofer, W. E. 
Donaldson, C. H. Hill, J. M. Leatherwood, J. G. Lecce, H. L. Lucas, G. 
Matrone, R. D. Mochrie, A. H. Rakes, H. A. Ramsey, H. A. Schneider, S. 
B. TovE, G. H. Wise; Professor Emeritus: F. H. Smith; Associate Professors: 
R. W. Harvey, E. E. Jones, J. J. McNeill; Assistant Professor: J. D. Garlich 

Graduate study leading to a Master of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degrees 
may be taken under the direction of any of the graduate faculty for the nutrition 
program. This program is interdepartmental, and the student may reside and con- 
duct research in any of the following departments which participate in the pro- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 209 

gram: animal science, poultry science, food science or biochemistry. The student 
will ordinarily reside in the department of his major adviser. The program involves 
various species of animals; therefore, the comparative approach to nutrition is em- 
phasized. 

Majors in the program may minor in biochemistry, microbiology, physiology, sta- 
tistics or other approved fields. 

Research facilities in each of the departments are extensive and the problems un- 
der investigation are many and varied. 

This program is administered by the Nutrition Advisory Committee through its 
executive committee comprising the committee chairman and one member from 
each participating department. Additional information about the program may be 
obtained by writing to any one of the above graduate faculty members or to the 
Chairman, Nutrition Program, P.O. Box 5306, School of Agriculture and Life Sci- 
ences, N. C. State University, Raleigh, North CaroHna 27607. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

NTR 415 (ANS 415, PO 415) Comparative Nutrition. Prerequisite: CH 220 or 
CH 221. 3(3-0) F. 

NTR 416 (ANS 416) Quantitative Nutrition. Prerequisite: BCH 351. 3(1-6) F. 

NTR 490 Nutrition Seminar. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 1(1-0) F,S. 

NTR 590 Topical Problems in Nutrition. Prerequisite: Graduate or senior stand- 
ing. Maximum 6 F,S. Analysis of problems of current interest in nutrition. Credit for 
this course will involve the scientific appraisal and solution of a selected problem. 
The problems will be designed to provide training and experience in research. 

Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

NTR 601 Amino Acids, Vitamins, and Minerals in Nutrition. Prerequisites: BCH 
551, ZO 421, and a 400-level nutrition course. 4(4-0) S. This course is designed to 
give the student knowledge in depth of the nutritional biochemistry of amino acids, 
vitamins and minerals. Nutritional principles are presented and interpreted from 
the viewpoint of metabolic pathways and biochemical reaction mechanisms. 

Garlich 

NTR 608 Energy Metabolism. Prerequisites: BCH 551 and an introductory nutri- 
tion course. 3(3-0) F. The course relates biochemical and physiological events within 
the cell, tissue, organ and system with the nutrient needs as sources of energy for 
productive animal life. Digestion, absorption and metabolism of carbohydrates un- 
der normal and pathological states will be discussed. Processes of energy transfor- 
mations within living structures will be presented in relation to free energy, biolo- 
gical oxidations, coupled reactions, anabolic and catabolic systems, hormonal ef- 
fects, metabolic control and efficiency. Leatherwood 

NTR 690 Advanced Special Problems in Nutrition. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. Maximum 6 F,S. Directed research in a specialized phase of nutrition designed 
to provide experience in research methodology and philosophy. Graduate Staff 



210 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

NTR 699 Research in Nutrition. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credits Ar- 
ranged, Maximum 6 F,S. Original research preparatory to the thesis for the Master 
of Science or Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

Associated courses related to nutrition are: 

FS 400 Foods and Nutrition. 

FS 402 Food Chemistry. 

BCH 653 (ANS 653) Mineral Metabolism. 



Operations Research 

PROGRAM COMMITTEE 

Professor: S. E. Elmaghraby, Chairman 

Professors: B. B. Bhattacharyya, J. W. Bishir, A. R. Eckels; Associate Profes- 
sors: R. H. Bernhard, W. D. Cooper, R. M. Felder, W. S. Caller, W. L. 
Hafley, C. Harrell, C. J. Maday, H. L. W. Nuttle; Assistant Professors: 
C. E. Bennington, R. E. Hartwig, T. L. Honeycutt, M. J. Magazine 

Operations Research is a graduate program of a multidisciplinary nature, govern- 
ed by an Administrative Board and the Program Committee, and administered 
through the office of the program director. 

The program offers the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy. 
Both are research degrees requiring thesis. A foreign language is not required at 
the Master's level and is optional with the student's advisory committee at the Doc- 
toral level. A brochure is available which describes in more detail the orientation 
requirements for both degrees. 

An advanced program of study in operations research implies intensive study in 
at least two of the following areas: mathematical optimization, control systems, sto- 
chastic systems, econometrics and economic decision theory, and information and 
cybernetics. 

CENTRAL COURSES 

OR 501 Introduction to Operations Research. Prerequisites: MA 405, MA 421. 3 
(3-0) F,Sum. OR Approach: modeling, constraints, objective and criterion. The prob- 
lem of Multiple criteria. Optimization, Model validation. The team approach. Sys- 
tems Design. Examples, OR Methodology: mathematical programming; optimum 
seeking; simulation, gaming; heuristic programming. Examples. OR Applications; 
theory of inventory; economic ordering under deterministic and stochastic demand. 
The production smoothing problem; linear and quadratic cost functions. Waiting 
line problems: single and multiple servers with Poisson input and output. The the- 
ory of games for two-person competitive situations. Project management through 
PERT-CPM. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 211 



OR 505 (IE 505, MA 505) Mathematical Programming I. Prerequisite: MA 405. 
3(3-0) F,Sum. A study of mathematical methods applied to problems of planning. 
Linear programming will be covered in detail. This course is intended for those who 
desire to study this subject in depth and detail. It provides a rigorous and complete 
development of the theoretical and computational aspects of this technique as well 
as a discussion of a nimiber of applications. Graduate Staff 

OR 509 (IE 509) Dynamic Programming. Prerequisites: MA 405, ST 421. 3(3-0) 
S.Sum. An introduction to the theory and computational aspects of dynamic pro- 
gramming and its application to sequential decision problems. Elmaghraby, Nuttle 

OR 520 Theory of Activity Networks. Prerequisites: OR 501, OR 505 (IE 505, MA 
505). 3(3-0) S. Introduction to graph theory and network theory. A discussion in 
depth of the theory underlying (i) deterministic activity networks (CPM): optimal 
time-cost trade offs; the problem of scarce resources; (ii) probabilistic activity net- 
works (PERT): critical evaluation of the underlying assumptions; (iii) generalized 
activity networks (GERT, GAN): applications of signal flow graphs and semi-Mar- 
kov process to probabilistic branching; relation to the theory of scheduling. (Offered 
in alternate years.) Elmaghraby 

OR 522 (IE 522) Dynamics of Industrial Systems. Prerequisite: IE 421. 3(3-0) F. 

A study of the dynamic properties of industrial systems; introduction to servo-me- 
chanism theory as applied to company operations. Simulation of large nonlinear, 
multiloop, stochastic systems on a digital computer; methods of determining modifi- 
cations in systems design and/or operating parameters for improved system behav- 
ior. Llewellyn 

OR 527 (CHE 527) Optimization of Engineering Processes. Prerequisites: MA 
511, CSC 111 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Mathematical methods for the optimization of 
engineering processes are developed, and illustrative applications of these methods 
are presented and discussed. Specific topics covered are drawn from a list which in- 
cludes mathematical programming, geometric progri'amming, sensitivity analysis, 
direct search and elimination techniques, variational techniques and the minimum 
principle, quasilinearization and dynamic programming. The emphasis throughout 
the course is on applications of the techniques discussed rather than fully rigorous 
development of the theory. Felder 

OR 561 (IE 561) Queues and Stochastic Service Systems. Prerequisite: MA 421. 
3(3-0) F. General concepts of stochastic processes are introduced. Poisson processes, 
Markov processes, and Renewal theory are presented. These are then used in the 
analysis of queues, starting with a completely memoryless queue to one with general 
parameters. Applications to many engineering problems will be considered. 

Magazine 

OR 585 (CSC 585) Graph Theory. Prerequisite: MA 231 or MA 405. 3(3-0) F, 
Sum. Basic concepts of graph theory. Trees and forests. Vector spaces associated 
with a graph. Representation of graphs by binary matrices and list structures. Tra- 
versability. Connectivity. Matchings and assignment problems. Planar graphs. 
Colorability. Directed graphs. Applications of graph theory with emphasis on organ- 
izing problems in a form suitable for computer solution. Staff 

OR 586 (IE 586) Network Flows. Prerequisites: OR 505 (IE 505, MA 505) or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. This course will study problems of flows in networks. These 
problems will include the determination of the shortest chain, maximal flow and mi- 
nimal cost flow in networks. The relationship between network flows and linear pro- 



212 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



gramming will be developed as well as problems with nonlinear cost functions, multi- 
commodity flows, and the problem of network synthesis. (Offered in alternate 
years.) Bennington 

OR 606 (MA 606, ST 606) Mathematical Programming II. Prerequisite: OR 505 
(IE 505, MA 505). 3(3-0) S. This course is intended for those who desire to study lin- 
ear and nonlinear programming from an advanced mathematical point of view. Spe- 
cial attention will be paid to the theoretical and computational aspects of current 
research problems in the field of linear and nonlinear programming, game theory, 
theor>' of graphs, discrete linear programming, linear programming, under uncer- 
tainty and dynamic programming. Bhattacharyya, Magazine 

OR 609 Advanced Dynamic Programming. Prerequisites: OR 509, MA 541. 3(3-0) 
F. Introduction to measure theoretic concepts, review of finite state Markov pro- 
cesses, theory of Markovian programming, discrete decision processes, continuous 
time dynamic programming, relation to Calculus of Variation and the Maximum 
Principle. Emphasis throughout is on recent theoretical development in the field. 
(Offered in alternate years.) Elmaghraby 

OR 631, 632 (EM 631, 632) Variational Methods in Optimization Techniques I, 

II. Prerequisites: (631) MA 511, MA 512; (632) OR 631. 3(3-0) F,S. Variational 
methods are applied to optimization problems in engfineering, where examples are 
drawn from flight mechanics, operations research, heat transfer, structures and 
aerodynamics. The necessary conditions which follow from the general variation of 
a functional are developed. Solutions with corners and discontinuities are consi- 
dered. Inequality constraints on control variables and constrained extreme are also 
considered. Gradient methods are described. Applications in operations research are 
made for problems with continuous function representation such as might be found 
in production scheduling, inventory control and process control. Maday 

OR 691 Special Topics in Operations Research. Prerequisites: OR 501, OR 505 
(IE 505, MA 505). 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. The purpose of this course is to allow individual 
students or small groups of students to take on studies of special areas in OR which 
fit into their particular program and which may not be covered by other OR courses. 
The work will be directed by a qualified faculty member and in some instances by 
visiting professors. The subject matter in any year is dependent on the students and 
the faculty members. Graduate Staff 

OR 692 (IE 692, MA 692) Special Topics in Mathematical Programming. Prere- 
quisite: OR 505 (IE 505, MA 505). 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. The study of special advanced 
topics in the area of mathematical programming. New techniques and current re- 
search in this area will be discussed. The faculty responsible for this course will 
select the areas to be covered during the semester according to their preference and 
interest. This course will not necessarily be taught by an individual faculty but can, 
on occasion, be a joint effort of several faculty members from this University as well 
as visiting faculty from other institutions. To date, a course on Theory of Networks 
and another in Integer Programming have been offered under the umbrella of this 
course. It is anticipated that these two topics will be repeated in the future, together 
with other topics. Graduate Staff 

OR 695 Seminar in Operations Research. Prerequisite: Enrollment in operations 
research as a major or minor. 1(1-0) F,S. Seminar discussion of operations research 
problems. Case analyses and reports. Graduate students with minors or majors in 
operations research are expected to attend throughout the period of their residence. 

Graduate Staff 



Economics 


EC 


550 


EC 


650 


EC 


651 ( 


EC 


652 ( 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 213 



OR 699 Project in Operations Research. Prerequisites: Variable. 1-3 F,S,Sum. 
Individual research by graduate students minoring and majoring in operations re- 
search. Research may be done under the operations research faculty member meet- 
ing the interest need of the student. Graduate Staff 



SUGGESTED COGNATE COURSES 

Civil Engineering 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems. 



Mathematical Models in Economics. 

Economic Decision Theory. 
(ST 651) Econometrics. 
(ST 652) Topics in Econometrics. 

Electrical Engineering 

EE 516 Feedback Control Systems. 

EE 520 Fundamentals of Logic Systems. 

EE 521 Digital Computer Technology and Design. 

EE 613, 614 Advanced Feedback Control. 

EE 642 Automata and Adaptive Systems. 

EE 651 Statistical Communication Theory. 

Industrial Engineering 

IE 523 Inventory Control Methods L 

IE 547 Engineering Reliability. 

IE 608 Linear Prog^ramming Applications. 

IE 611 The Design of Production Systems. 

IE 622 Inventory Control Method II. 

Mathenmtics 

MA 521 Fundamentals of Modern Algebra. 

MA 536 Logic for Digital Computers. 

MA 537 Mathematical Theory of Digital Computers. 

MA 541, 542 (ST 541, 542) Theory of Probability I & II. 

MA 617, 618 (ST 617, 618) Measure Theory and Advanced ProbaWlity. 

MA 619 (ST 619) Topics in Advanced Probability. 

MA 622 Linear Transformations and Matrix Theory. 

MA 641, 642 Calculus of Variations and Theory of Optimal Control I & II. 

Statistics 

ST 613, 614 Time Series Analysis I & II. 

ST 691 Advanced Special Problems. (A one-year course) 



214 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Physical Oceanography 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and departmental information, see geosciences, 
page 162.) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

OY 487 (CE 487, MAS 487) Physical Oceanography. Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 
212. 3(3-0) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

OY 541 (MAS 541, CE 541) Gravity Wave Theory I. Prerequisite: EM 303 or PY 
411. 3(3-0) S. Classical gravity wave theory with emphasis on the basic mechanics 
of wave motions, mass transport induced by waves and various conservation laws 
with their applications in wave study. Huang 

OY 551 (MAS 551) Ocean Circulation. Prerequisite: EM 303 or PY 411. 3(3-0) S. 
Basic study of the mechanics of ocean circulation with emphasis on various simple 
models of circulation systems. Pietrafesa 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

OY 601, 602 (MAS 601, 602) Advanced Physical Oceanography I, XL Prerequi- 
site: OY 487 (MAS 487, CE 487). 3(3-0) F,S. An in-depth discussion of phy- 
sical oceanography — both geographic and hydrodynamical aspects. Topics discussed 
include relief of ocean floor; physical properties of sea water; distribution of tem- 
perature, salinity and currents; and kinematical and dynamical studies of motion of 
sea water turbulence. Knowles 

OY 605, 606 (MAS 605, 606; EM 605, 606) Advanced Geophysical Fluid Me- 
chanics I, IL Prerequisite: EM 504, 505 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. An application of 
basic fluid mechanics principles in geophysical fluid mechanics studies with empha- 
sis on the most important physical parameters encountered in the field of geophysi- 
cal fluid mechanics, such as: mechanics of stratified fluids, rotating fluids, stratified 
and rotating fluid, stability and turbulence in ocean and atmosphere. (Offered 1975- 
76 and alternate years.) Huang 

OY 613, 614 (MAS 613, 614; EM 613, 614) Perturbation Method in Fluid Me- 
chanics I, II. Prerequisites: MA 401, EM 303. 3(3-0) F,S. Basic theory and applica- 
tion of perturbation methods in fluid mechanics including: regular and singular per- 
turbations, matching principles, method of strained coordinate, two variable expan- 
sion and applications to partial differential equations. (Offered 1974-75 and alter- 
nate years.) Huang 

OY 699 (MAS 699) Research in Physical Oceanography. Prerequisites: Gradu- 
ate standing and consent of advisory committee. Credits Arranged F,S. Graduate 
research in fulfillment of requirements for a graduate degree. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 215 



Physics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor L. W. Seagondollar, Head 

Professors: J. M. A. Danby, W. R. Davis, W. O. Doggett, G. L. Hall, A. W. 
Jenkins Jr., H. C. Kelly, J. T. Lynn— Graduate Administrator, E. R. 
Manring, J. D. Memory, A. C. Menius Jr., R. L. Murray, R. R. Patty, D.L. 
RiDGEWAY, D. R. Tilley, A. W. Waltner; Visiting University Professor: L. 
H. Thomas; Professors Emeriti: W. H. Bennett, F. W. Lancaster, J. S. 
Meares; Associate Professors: G. C. Cobb Jr., G. H. Katzin, D. H. Martin, 
G. E. Mitchell, M. K. Moss, J. Y. Park; Assistant Professors: K. T. Chung, 
R. E. Fornes, C. R. Gould, C. E. Johnson Jr., F. Lado Jr., G. W. Parker 
III, J. F. Schetzina 

Study in physics is available leading to the degrees Master of Science and Doctor 
of Philosophy. In addition to the areas of research listed below, thesis work may 
also be done in closely related departments in the fields of biophysics, environmen- 
tal sciences, nuclear reactor theory and computer science. Available to the depart- 
ment are the computer facilities (including the IBM System 370/165 computer) of 
the nearby Triangle Universities Computation Center which is jointly operated by 
Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Caro- 
lina State University. These three universities jointly staff the Triangle Universi- 
ties Nuclear Laboratory located on the Duke campus. The major facilities are a 15 
MeV Model FN Tandem Van de GraaflF accelerator with a 15 MeV cyclotron injec- 
tor and on-line computer facilities. 

Experimental along with theoretical work is being done in atmospheric physics, 
atomic and molecular physics, magnetic resonance, nuclear physics, plasma physics 
and semiconductor physics. Theoretical work is in relativity and general field the- 
ory and in statistical and solid state theory. 

Programs of study leading to the Master of Science degree require a minimum of 
30 semester hours, including four credits of research and two of seminar. In addi- 
tion, a thesis is required. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is granted on successful completion of exami- 
nations, independent research and the submission of an acceptable dissertation. A 
minor area of study is required, mathematics usually being elected. 

A large number of teaching and research assistantships are available. Depending 
upon the student's experience, these pay fi-om $3,000 to $4,200 for half-time duties 
during the nine-month school year and allow the student to carry 60 percent of a 
full course load. A student holding such a half-time assistantship may be eligible for 
special tuition charges. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

FY 401, 402 Modern and Quantum Physics I, IL Prerequisite: PY 411. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 



216 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



PY 407 Introduction to Modern Physics. Prerequisites: MA 202, PY 208. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 

PY 409 Ion and Electron Physics. Prerequisite: PY 414. 3(2-3) S. 

PY 410 Nuclear Physics I. Prerequisite: PY 203 or PY 407. 4(3-2) F,S. 

PY 411, 412 Mechanics I, II. Prerequisites: MA 301, PY 203 or PY 208. 3(3-0) F, 

S. 

PY 413 Thermal Physics. Prerequisite: PY 202 or PY 208; Corequisite: MA 301. 
3(3-0) S. 

PY 414, 415 Electricity and Magnetism I, II. Prerequisite: PY 203 or PY 208; 
Corequisite: MA 512. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PY 416 Physical Optics. Prerequisite: PY 415. 3(2-2) F. 

PY 443 Astrophysics. Prerequisites: PY 203 or PY 407; PY 411. 3(3-0) S. 

PY 451, 452 Intermediate Experiments in Physics I, II. Corequisites: PY 411, PY 

414. 2(1-3) F,S. 

PY 499 Special Problems in Physics. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 1-3 F, 

S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PY 501, 502 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics I, II. Prerequisites: MA 512; 
PY 411 or PY 414. 3(3-0) F,S. An introduction to the fundamental concepts and for- 
mulations of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, including its interpretation and 
techniques, and the application of the Schrodinger equation to bounded systems and 
to scattering systems. Other topics include approximation methods, angular momen- 
tum theory, identical particles and spin, transformation theory, symmetry and in- 
variance, radiation theory, S-matrix and T-matrix theory. Chung 

PY 503, 504 Introduction to Theoretical Physics I, II. Prerequisites: MA 512, PY 
412, PY 414. 3(3-0) F,S. An introductory course in theoretical physics which offers 
preparation for advanced graduate study. Emphasis is on classical mechanics and 
special relativity. Topics covered include variational principles, Lagrangian and 
Hamiltonian mechanics, canonical transformation theory, invariances and conserva- 
tion laws, structure of the Lorentz group, and elementary dynamics of unquantized 
fields. Katzin 

PY 507 Advanced Atomic Physics. Prerequisites: MA 512, PY 412, PY 415. 3(3-0) 
F. An introduction to the quantum mechanical treatment of atomic structure and 
spectra. Topics covered include the relativistic hydrogen atom, the heliimi atom, 
multielectron atoms, selection rules, etc. Memory 

PY 509 Plasma Physics. Prerequisite: PY 414. 3(3-0) F. A study of the individual 
and collective motion of charged particles in electric and magnetic fields and 
through ionized gases, including the pinch effect and induced processes in relativis- 
tic streams; transport equations; and properties of plasmas, including wave produc- 
tion and propagation, instabilities, shocks, and radiation losses, with applications. 

Doggett 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 217 



PY 510 Nuclear Physics II. Prerequisite: PY 410. 4(3-2) F. A study of the proper- 
ties of the atomic nucleus as revealed by radioactivity, nuclear reactions and scat- 
tering experiments, with emphasis on the experimental approach. The laboratory is 
designed to stimulate independent research and offers project work in nuclear spec- 
troscopy and in neutron physics. Waltner 

PY 511 (NE 511) Nuclear Physics for Engineers. Prerequisite: PY 410. 3(3-0) F. 
A study of the properties of atomic nuclei, of nuclear radiations and of the interac- 
tion of nuclear radiation with matter. Emphasis is placed on the principles under- 
lying the use of modern equipment and on techniques of nuclear measurement and 
their application to practical problems. Waltner 

PY 514, 515 Advanced Electricity and Magnetism I, II. Prerequisite: PY 415. 3 
(3-0) F,S. An advanced treatment of electromagnetic theory. Topics include: techni- 
ques for the solution of electrostatic and magnetostatic problems, special functions, 
the Fourier theorem for separable Hilbert spaces. Maxwell's equations, gauge trans- 
formations, four-dimensional Fourier transforms, dispersion relations. Green's func- 
tions, relativity, and radiation from accelerated charges. Hall 

PY 517 Molecular Spectra. Prerequisites: PY 407, PY 412; PY 507 recommended. 
3(3-0) S. Topics include the interpretation of infrared and Raman spectra for diato- 
mic and simple polyatomic molecules; the effects due to vibration-rotation interac- 
tion, electronic motion and nuclear spin; nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy; 
infrared absorption in the earth's atmosphere. Memory 

PY 520 Measurements in Nuclear Physics. Prerequisite: PY 410. 3(2-2) S. A 
study of the fundamental measurements in nuclear physics with emphasis on the 
statistical treatment of data. Waltner 

PY 521 Kinetic Theory of Gases. Prerequisite: PY 413. 3(3-0) F. A study of kine- 
tic equations, with emphasis on the transport properties of a dilute gas, including 
mean free path techniques and the Boltzmann equation and its consequences. Wide- 
ranging further applications include topics such as Brownian motion, population 
dynamics, etc. Lado 

PY 552 Introduction to the Structure of Solids. Prerequisite: PY 401. 3(3-0) S. 
Basic considerations of crystalline solids, metals, conductors and semiconductors. 

Schetzina 

PY 555 (MA 555) Mathematical Introduction to Celestial Mechanics. 3(3-0) F. 
(See mathematics, page 188.) 

PY 556 (MA 556) Orbital Mechanics. 3(3-0) S. (See mathematics, page 188.) 

PY 599 Senior Research. Prerequisite: Senior honors program standing, except 
with special permission. 3 F,S. Investigations in physics under the guidance of staff 
members that may consist of literature reviews, experimental measurements or the- 
oretical studies. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PY 600 Planetary Atmospheres. Prerequisite: PY 507. 3(3-0) S. Gas dynamics of 
atmospheres with emphasis on recent results of rocket, satellite and interplanetary 
probes. Theories of the airglow, aurora and ionosphere are developed. Manring 



218 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



PY 601, 602 Theoretical Physics I, II. Prerequisites: PY 503, PY 514; Corequi- 
site: MA 661. 3(3-0) F,S. The mathematical and theoretical approach to the relation- 
ships between various branches of physics is treated. The restricted theory of rela- 
tivity, electrodynamics, classical field theory and the general theory of relativity 
and geometrodynamics are considered. Davis 

PY 609 High Energy Physics. Prerequisite: PY 510. 3(3-0) S. The experimental 
and theoretical aspects of nuclear processes at high energy are treated. 

Graduate Staff 

PY 610 Advanced Nuclear Physics. Prerequisite: PY 410; Corequisite: PY 501. 3 
(3-0) F. A theoretical study of nuclear structure and reactions. Topics include the 
deuteron, low energry nucleon scattering, nuclear forces, nuclear moments, nuclear 
shell theory, collective model, compound nucleus, optical model and direct reaction 
theories. Park 

PY 611 Quantum Mechanics. Prerequisites: MA 512, PY 502. 3(3-0) F. A treat- 
ment of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics at the advanced level, including an in- 
troduction to the relativistic quantum theory of Dirac particles and the methods of 
Feynman that are employed in his formulation of positron theory. Applications are 
made to scattering problems and to general problems of atomic and molecular struc- 
ture. Park 

PY 612 Advanced Quantum Mechanics. Prerequisites: PY 601, PY 611. 3(3-0) S. A 
general propagator treatment of Dirac particles, photons, and scalar and vector 
mesons, with an introduction to quantum electrodynamics and S-matrix theory. Ap- 
plications of Feynman graphs and rules will be given illustrating basic techniques 
employed in the treatment of electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions. Renor- 
malization theory, the effects of radiative corrections and aspects of the general 
Lorentz covariant theory of quantized fields will also be considered. Park 

PY 622 Statistical Mechanics. Prerequisites: PY 413, PY 501, PY 503. 3(3-0) S. 
An introduction to the structure and techniques of equilibrium statistical mechanics 
(both classical and quantum) as a basis for the study of the equilibrium properties 
of bulk matter, including the derivation of the laws of thermodynamics and applica- 
tions to simple physical systems. Lado 

PY 630, 631 Nuclear Structure Physics I, II. Prerequisites: PY 502, PY 510. 3 
(3-0) F,S. Advanced description of nuclear models and nuclear reactions. Topics in- 
clude: internucleon forces, compound nucleus processes, shell model, optical model, 
R-matrix theory, direct reactions, collective model, electromagnetic transitions, iso- 
baric analog states. Mitchell 

PY 641 Non-Inertial Space Mechanics. Prerequisites: MA 661, PY 601; Corequi- 
site: PY 602. 3(3-0) S. This course treats the theoretical description of the pheno- 
mena of mechanics relating to noninertial frames of reference, with applications to 
space travel and the instrumentation problems of rocketry. Applications to inertial 
guidance and electromagrnetic-inertial coupling effects are also considered. Davis 

PY 651 Mathematics of Solid-State and Many-Body Theory. Prerequisites: MA 
513, PY 502, PY 552. 3(3-0) F. Fourier techniques from solid-state theory are gener- 
alized and adapted to many areas of physics. Topics include: Fourier series on n-di- 
mensional Bravais lattices, Fourier integrals, Schwartz distributions, Brillouin 
zones. Green's functions, Patterson functions, convolutions, and correlation coeffi- 
cients. The Poisson sum formula and the theta function summation method are ex- 
tensively developed for Bravais and non-Bravais lattices in n-dimensions. Hall 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 219 



PY 652 Cooperative Phenomena in Solids. Prerequisite: PY 651. 3(3-0) S. Classi- 
cal and quantum theories of equilibrium and transport properties of ferromagnetism, 
antiferromagnetism, and order-disorder in alloys. Statistical mechanics of, and 
phase transitions in, these and other systems are treated. Hall 

PY 655 (MA 655) Qualitative Methods in Celestial Mechanics. 3(3-0) F. (See 
mathematics, page 191.) 

PY 656 (MA 656) Perturbation Theory in Celestial Mechanics. 3(3-0) S. (See 
mathematics, page 191.) 

The following five courses offer opportunities for advanced study in special areas of 
physics under staff members working in these areas. 

PY 690 Special Topics in Molecular Physics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
1-6 F,S. 

PY 691 Special Topics in Nuclear Physics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
1-6 F,S. 

PY 692 Special Topics in Plasma Physics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1-6 
F,S. 

PY 693 Special Topics in Solid State Physics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 

1-6 F,S. 

PY 694 Special Topics in Theoretical Physics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
1-6 F,S. 

PY 695 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Reports on topics of current interest in physics. Se- 
veral sections are offered so that students with common research interests may be 
grouped together. Graduate Staff 

PY 699 Research. Credits Arranged. Graduate students sufficiently prepared may 
undertake research in some selected field of physics. Graduate Staff 



Physiology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: L. Goode, C. H. Hill, E. Hodgson, L S. Longmuir, H. L. Lucas Jr., 
D. E. Smith, L. C. Ulberg; Adjunct Professor: D. H. K. Lee; Awociatc Pro- 
fessors: E. V. Caruolo, T. E. LeX'ere, j. F. Roberts J. P. Thaxto.n, R. T. 
Yaaiamoto; Assistant Professors: B. H. Johnson, W. P. Marley 

Graduate study under the direction of the physiology faculty may lead to the 
Miister of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The physiology faculty is 
an interdepartmentcil group diavvn fiom the departments participating in the pro- 
gram. They are: animiil science, biochemistry, entomology, physical education, 
poultry science, psychology, statistics and zoology. The progriun emphiisizes the 
comparative approach implicit in this type of organization. 



220 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Experimental facilities of the above depaitments are available for physiological 
research, as are such special facilities as the Reproductive Physiology Laboratory 
and the Wrightsville Marine Biomedical Laboratory. Experimental animals avail- 
able cover a wide range, from insects and other invertebrates to large mammals. 

In addition to courses in physiology, majors in the program are expected to take 
selected courses in biochemistry and cell biology. Minors are usually chosen from 
such fields as biochemistry, cell biology, entomology, genetics, statistics iind zool- 
ogy. \ strong basic knowledge in one of these areas is essential. 

Financial assistance for qualified students in the form of research assistantships, 
fellowships and traineeships is aviulable through participating departments. Pro- 
spective students may obtain further infomiation by writing to any one of the grad- 
uate faculty listed above or to the Chaiirnan, Physiology Program P. O. Box 5306, 
N. C. State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 

Graduate students enrolled as physiology majors are located in the depiirtment of 
their major professor and may participate in the activities of that department. 

PHY 502 (ANS 502) Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. 3(3-0) S. (See ani- 
mal science, page 69.) 

PHY 503 General Physiology I. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 3(3-0) 
F. The general principles of homeostatis will be discussed, emphasizing the impor- 
tance of integrative action. The following systems will be studied: respiratory, car- 
diovascular, renal, reproductive, and myological. Longmuir, Staff 

PHY 504 General Physiology II. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 3(3-0) 
S. The general principles of homeostatis will be discussed, emphasizing the impor- 
tance of integrative action. The following will be studied: alimentary, reticuloendo- 
thelial, central nervous, autonomic nervous, and endocrine systems; detoxication 
mechanisms; special senses; and the response of man to the environment. 

Longmuir, Staff 

PHY 513 (ZO 513) Comparative Physiology. 4(3-3) S. (See zoology, page 277.) 

PHY 553 (BCH 553) Physiological Biochemistry. 3(3-0) S. (See biochemistry, 
page 74.) 

PHY 575 (ZO 575, ENT 575) Physiology of Invertebrates. Prerequisite: Consent 

of instructor. 3(3-0) F. The course deals with the physiology of the invertebrates, in- 
cluding the Insecta but excluding the Protozoa. The unity of the physiology of the 
various groups is stressed, and the relationship of physiology to contemporary biol- 
ogy and to other related biological fields will be illustrated. Graduate Staff 

PHY 580 (ANS 580) Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. 3(3-0) F. (See animal 
science, page 69.) 

PHY 590 Special Problems in Physiology. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, con- 
sent of instructor. Credits Arranged. Graduate Staff 

PHY 604 (ANS 604) Experimental Animal Physiology. 4(2-4) F. (See animal sci- 
ence, page 70.) 

PHY 690 Physiology Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1(1-0) S. 

Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 221 



PHY 695 Selected Topics in Physiology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1-4. 

Graduate Staff 

PHY 699 Physiological Research. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, consent of 
instructor. Credits Arranged F,S. 

Graduate Staff 

COURSES FROM ASSOCIATED DEPARTMENTS 

PO 524 (ZO 524) Comparative Endocrinology. 
BCH 551 General Biochemistry. 
ZO 614 Advanced Cell Biology. 

OTHER SUPPORTING COURSES AVAILABLE 

ENT 611 Biochemistry of Insects. 

GN 532 (ZO 532) Biological Effects of Radiations. 

PSY 502 Physiological Psychology. 

ZO 510 Adaptive Behavior of Animals. 

Certain courses on the interface between physiology and engineering may be 
taken after consultation with adviser and the instructors concerned. 



Plant Pathology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. Aycock, Head 

Professors: J. L. Apple, K. R. Barker, C. N. Clayton, E. B. Cowling, E. Echandi, 
G. V. Gooding Jr., T. T. Hebert, G. B. Lucas, L. W. Nielsen, N. T. 
Powell, J. N. Sasser, D. L. Strider, Hedwig H. Triantaphyllou, N. N. 
Winstead; Professors USDA: C. S. Hodges Jr., J. P. Ross; Adjunct Professor: 
G. H. Hepting; Extension Professor: J. C. Wells; Professor Emeriti: D. E. 
Elus, C. J. NusBAUM, F. L. Wellman; Associate Professors: M. K. Beute, 
L. F. Grand, D. Huisingh, S. F. Jenkins Jr., M. P. Levi, L. T. Lucas, C. El 
Main, R. D. Milholland; Associate Professors USDA: K. J. Leonard, R. A 
Reinert, H. W. Spurr Jr., R. E. Welty; Adjunct Associate Professors: J. W. 
KoENiGS, E. G. Kuhlman; Extension Associate Professors: H. E. Duncan — In 
Charge, C. W. Averre; Assistant Professor: C. G. Van Dyke; Adjunct 
Assistant Professor: R. W. Pero; Assistant Professor USDA: A. S. Heagle 

The Plant Pathology faculty exhibits strength in forest pathology, nematology, 
virology and generiil plant pathology. Programs leading to both the .\liister of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are ofifered. 

Strong foundation courses in biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics and soil 
science are usually prerequisite for admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. 
For students who wish more general training without the thesis retjuirement, the 
Master of .Agriculture and Miister of Life Sciences degrees are offered, \\ith major 
emphasis in plant pathology. 



222 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Opportunities for employment include research, extension iuid teaching appoint- 
ments at huid grant colleges and with the United States Department of Agriculture. 
The agricultural chemicals industry also utilizes plant pathologists in research, 
promotion and service. Plant pathologists often participate in foreign seivice 
through international and federal organizixtions, as well as in commercial enter- 
prises. 

Separate laboratories fully efjuipped and stiiffed for research in nematology, 
virology, physiology of pathogenesis and special biochemical problems are aviiil- 
able; excellent facilities also exist for triuning in general phytopathology. In-depth 
training in all of these areas is possible. 

The Department has greenhouse fiicilities and controlled environmental studies 
in a new Phytotron. Student participation in the Plant Disease Clinic provides 
experience in the diagnosis of iill types of plant diseases. 

North Carolina exhibits a wide range of soil types and climatic areas. Large 
acreages are planted to a variety of field, vegetable and orniimental crops, iis well 
as forest trees. Special facilities for experimental work on diseases of these crops 
are found at some 16 permanent research stations located throughout the state. 

The Department has a number of graduate fellowships and assistantships fimded 
bv the Agricultural Experiment Station, the Agricultiual Foundation iuid other 
agencies. Stipends are adjusted to the previous training and experience of the 
recipients. The E. G. Moss and W. E. Cooper Memorial Fellowship funds supple- 
ment stipends of exceptional students. Students applying directly for aid from the 
National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health iuid other griuiting 
agencies are invited to specify the department as host institution. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PP 500 Plant Disease Control. Prerequisite: PP 315. 3(2-3) S. Disease control 
strategies and tactics are developed in a practical manner. Control economics and 
practices are considered in relation to principles and current research on biological, 
cultural, physical and chemical methods. Disease resistance and regulatory methods 
are also discussed. Jenkins, Spurr 

PP 501 Phytopathology L Prerequisites: PP 315 or equivalent. 5(3-6) F. A study 
of the classification, terminology, etiology and basic concepts of plant diseases 
caused by fungi and bacteria. In-depth studies of carefully selected examples will 
be used to illustrate and integrate general principles. Laboratory sessions will 
consider research and diagnostic techniques including preparation of media, isolation 
and study of pathogens in pure culture, inoculation, symptom development and 
disease measurement. Echandi, Strider 

PP 502 Phytopathology H. Prerequisites: PP 315 or equivalent. 5(3-6) S. A study 
of virus, nematode, and abiotic diseases of plants with an overall consideration of 
such major topics as epidemiology, and control. Laboratory sessions will consider 
useful research and diagnostic techniques. Powell, Barker, Main, Gooding 

PP 503 Identification of Plant Pathogenic Fungi. Prerequisites: Mycology or one 
advanced course in plant pathology. 3(4-12) Sum. A study of the recognition and 
identification of fungi which cause plant diseases and the differentiation of fungal 
diseases from those caused by other agents. Special consideration will be given to 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 223 



use of keys in the identification of fun^ and the major sources of descriptive infor- 
mation on plant pathogens. (Offered first summer session 1974 and alternate years.) 

Grand 

PP 507 (MB 507) Pathogenic Microbiology. 4(3-2) F. (See microbiology, page 
203.) 

PP 575 (MB 575, BO 575) The Fungi. 3(3-0) F. (See botany, page 83.) 

PP 576 (BO 576, MB 576) The Fungi— Lab. 1(0-3) F. (See botany, page 83.) 

PP 595 Special Problems in Plant Pathology. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. 
Credits Arranged, Maximum 6. Investigation of special problems in plant pathology 
not related to a thesis problem. The investigations may consist of original research 
and/or literature survey. Staff 

FOR GRADUATE ONLY 

PP 604 Morphology and Taxonomy of Nematodes. Prerequisites: PP 550, consent 
of instructor. 3(1-6) S. A study of the morphology, anatomy and taxonomy of nema- 
todes w^ith emphasis on the identification of important plant-parasitic genera. 
Exercises include preparation of semipermanent and permanent nematode mounts. 

H. H. Triantaphyllou 

PP 605 Plant Virology. Prerequisites: PP 315, ON 411, and a course in organic 
chemistry. 3(1-6) F. A study of plant viruses including effects on host plants, trans- 
mission, classification, methods of purification, determination of properties, 
chemical nature, structure and multiplication. (Offered in 1975 and alternate years.) 

Hebert 

PP 608 History of Phytopathology. Prerequisites: PP 315, consent of instructor. 
1(1-0) F. Development of the science of phytopathology from its early beginnings to 
the early part of the 20th century. (Offered 1975 and alternate years.) Staff 

PP 609 Current Phytopathological Research Under Field Conditions. Prerequi- 
sites: Graduate standing. 2(1-3) S. Study of concepts involved, procedures used, 
and evaluation made in current phytopathological research by plant pathology 
staff. Visits to various research stations will be made by the class. Clayton 

PP 611 Advanced Plant Nematology. Prerequisite: PP 604. 3(2-3) S. A study of 
the biology, physiology and ecology of plant parasitic nematodes with emphasis on 
mechanisms of pathogenesis, host responses to infection and population dynamics. 
Laboratory exercises will include methods of cultivating nematodes and means of 
determining nutritional requirements, special physiological techniques and ap- 
proaches used in ecological investigation. (Offered in 1974 and alternate years.) 

Barker 

PP 612 Plant Pathogenesis. Prerequisite: PP 500, consent of instructor. 3(2-3) F. 
The following major topics will be considered: Infection processes, alterations in 
photosynthesis, respiration, nitrogen metabolism, vascular function and growth 
regulator function. The biochemical nature of the weapons utilized by pathogens in 
pathogenic attack and the defensive mechanisms employed by the hosts in resisting 
attack and the resultant dynamic interactions will be the central theme of the 
course. (Offered in 1974 and alternate years.) Huisingh 

PP 614 Nematode Development, Cytology and Genetics. Prerequisites: PP 604 or 
consent of instructor. 2(1-3) F. A study of embryogenesis, post-embryonic develop- 



224 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ment, gametogenesis, cytology, reproduction, sexuality, genetics and evolution of 
nematodes with emphasis on plant-parasitic forms. Laboratory exercises include 
small research projects in each area of study and demonstrations of techniques and 
materials. (Offered in 1974 and alternate years.) A. C. Triantaphyllou 

PP 625 (BO 625) Advanced Mycology. Prerequisites: PP 575 or consent of in- 
structor. 4(2-6) F. An in-depth treatment of major groups of fungi. Aspects of taxo- 
nomy, nomenclature, developmental morphology, genetics, host-parasite relations, 
physiology, and ecology will be presented. Laboratories will provide opportunities 
to study cardinal characteristics of selected fungi representing the major groups; 
field observations and collecting will be included. (Offered in 1974 and alternate 
years.) Grand 

PP 650 Colloquium in Plant Pathology. Prerequisites: PP 502 or consent of in- 
structor. 3(3-0) F. Group discussion of prepared topics assigned by the instructor 
with the view of developing a thorough understanding of basic concepts and their 
significance in the etiology, pathogenesis, epidemiology and control of plant diseases. 
Attention will be given to the genesis and evolution of fundamental ideas and values 
and how the development of new techniques and the acquisition of new knowledge 
influences the advancement of plant pathology and its various specialized fields. 
(Offered 1975 and alternate years.) Cowling 

PP 690 Seminar in Plant Pathology. Prerequisite: Consent of seminar chairman. 
1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of phjlopathological topics selected and assigned by seminar 
chairman. Graduate Staff 

PP 699 Research in Plant Pathology. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, consent 
of instructor. Credits Arranged. Original research in plant pathology. 

Graduate Staff 



Politics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor W. J. Block, Head 

Professors: F. \'. Cahill Jr., j. T. Caldwell — Chancellor, A. Holtznian, R. O. 
TiLMAN — Dean, School of Liberal Arts; Associate Professors: H. G. Keb- 
schull, |. M. McClain, K. S. Petersen, J. O. Williams; Assistant Professor: 
W. G. Ellis 

The Department of Politics offers a program of graduate studies leading to a 
Master of Arts degree and a Nhister of Public Affairs degree. 

A ciuididate for admission to either progriun must have demonstrated iin aptitude 
for graduate study in politics; the student may also be required to take certain 
further undergraduate courses to make up ;uiy deficiencies that may exist in his 
record. 

The Ma.ster of Public Affairs degree recjuires completion of a 36-.semester hour 
professional program for persons who are now or hope to be employed by govern- 
ment or by a government related private enterpri.se or iissociation. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 225 



The program requires 27 hours to be selected from courses offered bv the De- 
partment of Pohtics. Students may concentrate either in administration, com- 
parative pohtical development, or American political institutions and processes. 
The remiiining hours may be taken in another discipline, such as economics, 
English, history, operations research, psychology, s(xiology or statistics. \s an 
alternative the student may take the remaining hours in some area of technology, 
such as adult education and water resources, civil engineering, forestry. 

Students who enroll in the program should have completed nine hours in the 
social sciences (including three in government) as undergraduates and have 
achieved a B average in the imdergraduate major. 

The Master of Arts degree requires each candidiite to complete 30 hours of 
graduate work. The candidate must concentrate (18-21 hours, including thesis) in 
two major fields in the Department of Politics. Major fields are to be selected fi-om 
the following: political theory, .American politics, comparative politics, inter- 
national relations and public administration. A disciplinary minor of 9 to 12 hours 
outside the Department of Politics is required. In either case a student's work in a 
minor field must constitute a unified pattern and must contribute to one or both of 
the student's major fields. 

In either progrixm each student will be assigned to a graduate committee chair- 
man for the preparation of a study which shall be subject to the approval of two 
other committee members, including one from outside the Department of Politics. 

Scope and Method of Politics (PS 509) is required of every candidate for both 
degrees as are comprehensive written and oral examinations. In addition, a Ciindi- 
date for the Master of Arts degree must demonstrate reading proficiency in one 
modern language (nonnally Geirnan, French, Spanish or Russian) and write a 
thesis in one of his major areas. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 



PS 401 .American Parties and Pressure Groups. 3(3-0) F. 

PS 403 Black Americans in American Politics. Prerequisite: Six hours of social 
science. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PS 404 Black Political Ideology. Prerequisite: Six hours of social science. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 

PS 405 National Security Policy. Prerequisite: PS 321. 3(3-0) S.Sum. 

PS 406 Politics and Policies of .\merican State Governments. 3(3-0) F.S.Sum. 

PS 421 Soviet and Soviet Bloc Foreign Policy. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 
3(3-0) F,S. 

PS 431 International Organization. 3(3-0) S. 

PS 461 Public Opinion in Democracies. Prerequisite: Three hours of politics. 
3(3-0) F,S. 



226 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PS 472 Soviet Politics. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PS 473 Political Systems of New States. 3(3-0) F. 

PS 475 Governments and Politics in the Middle East. Prerequisite: Junior stand- 
ing in any curriculum. 3(3-0) F. 

PS 493 Seminar on Theories of Political Violence and Nonviolence. Prerequisite: 
Junior standing. 3(3-0) S,Sum. 

PS 494, 495 (SOC 494, 495) Urban Seminar. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3 
(3-0) F,S. 

PS 496 Governmental Internship and Seminar. Prerequisite: Junior standing; ap- 
proval of the committee of election. Credits Arranged. 3-6 S. 

PS 498 Special Topics in Politics. Prerequisite: Six hours of politics. 3-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PS 500 Political Thought: Plato to the Reformation. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 3(3-0) F. The emergence and development of the theories underlying or ex- 
plaining the political aspects of behavior, approached through the study of the writ- 
ings of the principal political philosophers from the days of the Greek city-state to 
the Reformation. Marshall 

PS 501 Modern Political Theory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of the state and its relationship to individuals and groups, approached 
through reading of selected passages from the works of outstanding philosophers 
from the 16th century to the present. Marshall 

PS 502 (ED 502) Public Administration. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3 
(3-0) F,S,Sum. A study of the factors which contribute to goal displacement in pub- 
lic agencies and the institutions, concepts and techniques which may be used in such 
agencies to reduce the effects of these factors. Block, McClain, Ellis 

PS 503 Comparative Administration. Prerequisite: PS 502 or F'S 473 or consent of 
instructor. 3(3-0) F,S. Concentration will be on administrative systems of develop- 
ing nations with limited attention to developed systems. The major emphasis will be 
on administrative aspects of governmental change and modernization in developing 
nations; colonial influence on administration; problems of establishing new nations 
and adapting to change in established states; bureaucratic development and behav- 
ior; theories of development administration. Ellis 

PS 505 Contemporary Political Theory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3(3-0) 
S. The course will focus upon major topics in contemporary political theory, includ- 
ing the relationship between political science theory and political philosophy; the 
foundations, conditions, and prospects of democratic forms of government; bureau- 
cratization and democratic values; theories of mass society; violence and revolution 
as possible instruments of democratic change; human nature and politics; and di- 
lemmas of modern citizenship. Attention will be given to the actual and potential 
contributions of empirical studies to the analysis of the various topics. The range of 
writers studied will extend from social scientists, such as Robert Dahl and Seymour 
Lipset, to political philosophers, such as Leo Strauss, Herbert Marcuse, and Albert 
Camus. Marshall 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 227 



PS 506 Public Personnel Administration. Prerequisite: PS 502 or consent of in- 
structor. 3(3-0) Sum. A study in depth of the institutions and the sequence of pro- 
cesses in public personnel administration. It examines existing practices but is 
primarily concerned with emerging theories and trends. Kllis 

PS 507 Collective Negotiations in the Public Ser\ice. Prerequisite: PS 201 or con- 
sent of instructor. 3(3-0) Sum. This course includes intensive consideration of the 
background of collective negotiations movement; analysis of key policy issues, such 
as bargaining rights and use of strike weapons; framework for collective negotia- 
tions; scope and conduct of negotiations; impasse resolution; grievance procedure. 

Ellis 

PS 509 Scope and Method of I'olitics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. This course reviews contemporary theories, concepts and methods funda- 
mental to the study of politics. It emphasizes current empirical research and the 
collateral involvement in research activities aimed at the development of basic 
skills in this area. Williams, Rassel 

PS 510 Public Finance. Prerequisite: EC 205. 3(3-0) F. A survey of the theories 
and practices of governmental taxing, spending, and borrowing, including inter- 
governmental relationships and administrative practices and problems. McClain 

PS 511 The Budgetary Process. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and at least 
nine hours in the social sciences including a course in American government. 3(3-0) 
S,Sum. A study of the generalized budgetary process used at all levels of govern- 
ment in the United States. Understanding of the process is based upon comprehen- 
sion of the institutions involved, the roles of politicians and professionals, and the 
objectives of budgetary systems. The course will also focus upon budgetary reforms 
and the expanding Planning-Programming-Budgeting System as a management 
tool. McClain 

PS 512 .American Constitutional Theory. Prerequisite: PS 200 or an acceptable sub- 
stitute. 3(3-0) F. Basic constitutional doctrines, including fundamental law, judicial 
review, individual rights and political privileges, and national and state power. 
Special attention is given to the application of these doctrines to the regulation of 
business, agi-iculture and labor and to the rights safeguarded by the First, Fifth and 
Fourteenth Amendments to the Constitution. Cahill 

PS 513 Constitutional Theory II. Prerequisite: .Advanced undergraduate or grad- 
uate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. A continuation of PS 512 but may be elected separately. 
An examination of leading constitutional cases, especially in the fields of civil liber- 
ties and individual rights, and the writings of leading commentators. Cahill 

PS 515 American Political Thought. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 3 
(3-0) F,S,Sum. The course will examine and evaluate major .American writings on 
the nature and purpose of politics. Readings will be grouped under the following 
topics: (1) various interpretations of the .American Constitution and the principles 
embodied therein; (2) writings on civil and natural rights; (3) the character of 
American liberalism; (4) Black .American political thought and (5) the contempo- 
rary crisis in liberal thought. The purpose is to develop the independent capacity to 
read and reflect with care on the grounds of different views about .American politics. 

.Marshall 

PS 516 Public Policy .Analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; advanced under- 
graduate standing and consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Course will focus on 
the theories and methodology of analyzing and explaining public policy and the sub- 



228 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



stance of recent domestic policies in the human and physical resources area, includ- 
ing welfare, poverty, education, housing, urban renewal, transportation, recreation- 
conservation, and agfi'iculture. Williams 

l*S 517 (SOC 517) The Police Bureaucracy in Democratic Society. Prerequisite: 
Senior or graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. This is a political science seminar which 
focuses on the proposition that police departments are bureaucratic organizations 
which can be studied as such. Emphasis is placed on understanding the process by 
which police policy is made. Internal and external, psychological and structural 
variables are identified in tracing decisions on specific issues. Thus, attitudes of 
policemen, the nature of their work, and the resources and power of various 
constituencies are factors seen as determining police behavior. Wentworth 

I'S 520 Urban I'olitics. Prerequisite: PS 206. 3(3-0) F,S. A comparative study of 
political conditions in cities and localities. Topics will include the formal structures 
and rules of city and metropolitan governments, and the relationships to the infor- 
mal norms and distribution of power; patterns of local decision-making: elite re- 
cruitment and citizen participation; variations of local autonomy and the scope of 
local politics; and approaches to urban policy issues. Clary 

PS 521 Problems in Urban and Metropolitan Area Government. Prerequisite: PS 
206 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. This course examines theory and research on 
problems affecting governments in metropolitan areas. Principal attention is given 
to those problems which affect (or result from) governmental structure, institutions, 
and politics and to the alternative approaches to their solution. Clary 

l*S 522 Seminar on War and Peace in the International System. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing. 3(3-0) F. This seminar will focus upon war and peace in the intei-- 
national system; in particular, the circumstances under which violent international 
conflict is likely and the factors that enhance the probability that the conflicts will 
be resolved by peaceful means. Consideration will not only be given to the wars and 
problems of the past but also to alternative future worlds in which war or peace 
might be prevalent. The course will focus on empirical theory and research includ- 
ing the work of peace theorists and futures researchers. Soroos 

PS 531 The Legislative I'rocess. Prerequisite: PS 206 or consent of instructor. 3 
(3-0) S. A study of the formulation of public policy from the institutional and behav- 
ioral viewpoints. Important current legislative problems at the congi-essional and 
state legislative levels will be selected and will serve as a basis for analyzing the 
legislative process. Holtzman 

PS 532 The Chief Executive. Prerequisite: PS 200 or 201. 3(3-0) F.Sum. This 
course will focus upon three major concepts of the office of the chief executive, as 
developed under several incumbents. First are the institutions which surround that 
oftlce and which facilitate the expansion of its power and operations. Next are the 
various roles, which are played by different chief executives. Last are the processes 
of leadership by which the chief executive can attempt to direct the machinery of 
government to achieve predetermined objectives. Holtzman 

PS 542 Governmental Planning. Prerequisite: PS 502. 3(3-0) F.Sum. A study of 
the planning function at all levels of government in the United States, with particu- 
lar attention to the problems posed for planning by the rapid growth of metropolitan 
areas. McClain 

PS 552 Seminar in Management Systems. Prerequisite: Six hours of graduate 
public administration including either PS 509 or PS 516. 3(3-0) S. A special gradu- 
ate-level seminar that is to be an integral part of the Master of Public Affairs Pro- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 229 



gram in the Department of Politics. The students in this seminar will study in detail 
the various management systems in use in the public administration field. Through 
case studies and applied methodology, students in the course apply management 
systems theory to practical problems in the public sector. Graduate Staff 

I*S 572 Seminar in Comparative Politics. Prerequisite: One course in comparative 
politics. 3(3-0) F,S. This seminar will open with a survey of the problems and meth- 
ods of comparative political analysis, after which students will be assigned a speci- 
fic, limited subject to be examined within the framework of a systematic, analytical 
scheme appropriate to the topic. Specific topics will be drawn from the subjects of 
political ideologies, political groups, political elites, and decision-making institu- 
tions and processes. Kebschull 

PS 573 Problems of National Integration and Institution Building in Black 
.Africa. Prerequisite: Comparative government course or consent of instructor. 3 
(3-0) S. A central problem in the political development of Afi-ican nations is the 
building of institutions capable of creating and managing change in the face of cul- 
tural pluralism. This course will look at theories of cultural pluralism, the back- 
ground and consequences of cultural pluralism in Africa, and the attempts by var- 
ious political actors and institutions (e.g., "charismatic" leaders, political parties, 
armies, governments) to cope with the fact of cultural pluralism. Hurwitz 

PS 574 Political Systems and Constraints on Development in Latin .America. Pre- 
requisite: Senior or graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. The course focuses on the adequacy 
of Latin America's contemporary political systems for meeting the challenges of 
economic development. Several different approaches to developmental problems will 
be studied, as well as political factors Vv-hich have retarded their implementation. 
The political systems of Latin America will be examined, along with the value sys- 
tems and power capabilities of important groups. The leftist critique of the estab- 
lished political systems and its relationship to contemporary guerrilla movements 
concludes the course. Graduate Staff 

PS 575 Political Development. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science. 3 
(3-0) F. This course examines the concept, theories, characteristics and problems of 
political development. Within a broad historical ft-amework, particular subjects are 
analyzed in relationship to political development. These subjects include, among 
others, political culture, political integration, political institutions, military forces, 
and economic development. Data derived from comparative cultural and political 
studies are employed in an attempt to discover patterns of change related to politi- 
cal development. Kebschull, Hurwitz 

PS 578 Comparative Communist Systems. Prerequisite: Comparative government 
course or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S. A study of the international Communist 
movement and the evolution of the international sub-system of Communist states. 
Focuses on the Soviet and Chinese systems as alternative models for development 
in Communist and non-Communist states. .Additional emphasis is placed on the in- 
stitutional, political and ideological similarities and differences within the Commu- 
nist world and major Communist parties outside the Communist state system. 

M astro 

PS 590 Topics in Political Theory. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing. 3 
(3-0) F,S. A close examination of particular topics or theorists that are not included 
in the basic courses in political theory. Course content changes in different years, 
and, with permission of instructor, the course may be repeated for credit. Examples 
of course topics are: "Foundations of Modem Radicalism," "Twentieth Century Po- 
litical Philosophy and Political Science," "Political Philosophy and the Problem of 
Law," and "Origins of F'olitical Science." Marshall 



230 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PS 601 Seminar in Party and Group Politics. Prerequisite: PS 401 and consent of 
instructor. 3(3-0) S. This course examines in depth such problems as mobilization of 
consent, recruitment of leaders, financing and conduct of campaigns, nomination 
processes, interparty and intraparty politics, party-interest group relations and ide- 
ology, and party-interest group relations with government and public policy. Short 
research papers will be required, some of which will be presented and evaluated in 
class. Holtzman 

PS 602 Seminar in Legislative Problems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 
consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. This seminar considers basic problems characteris- 
tic of .•American legislative systems: development and maintenance for formal and 
informal rules of the game; relationships between outside inputs (by parties, inter- 
est groups, constituents, executives, courts) and legislators; strategies and tactics 
of leadership; committee decision-making, roles and role behavior of legislators; bi- 
cameral and apportionment problems. Each student is required to do extensive read- 
ing, to interview legislators and those who seek to influence them and to prepare re- 
ports. Holtzman 

PS 603 Seminar in Administrative Problems. Prerequisite: PS 502 or equivalent. 
2-4. S,Sum. An advanced course in administrative principles and methods. Students 
will perform individual or group research, under supervision in specific administra- 
tive topics within the context of those public agencies which function in their re- 
spective fields of technology. Block 

PS 604 Seminar in Judicial Problems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing; PS 533 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Building on previously acquired familiarity with the judicial 
process, this course requires the students to work in depth on one or more contem- 
porary judicial problems and to use various research techniques in his study. 

Cahill 

PS 605 Seminar in Organizational Theory. Prerequisite: PS 502. 3(3-0) F,S. A 
seminar in which the students read, analyze and discuss the original writings of 
some of the major theories of organizational structures and behavior. It will focus 
upon classical management theory, the human relations theories, and recent empiri- 
cal and integrative organizational theories. Among the writers upon whose works 
the seminar will focus are Max Weber, Mary Parker Follett, Luther Gulick, Fi'eder- 
ick Taylor, Elton Mayo, F. J. Roethlisberger, Chester Barnard, Herbert Simon, 
Amiti Etzioni, Robert Presthus, Victor Thompson, and Robert Golembiewski. Or- 
ganization theories are based upon studies of both private and public organizations, 
so the literature of both areas is relevant. However, most of the emphasis upon cur- 
rent theories will focus on the public or governmental sector. Ellis, Block 

PS 606 Seminar in Policy and Administration. Prerequisite: PS 505 and three 
additional hours in administration. 3(3-0) F. A seminar in theories and techniques 
of administration in applied situations, using case study techniques. McClain 

PS 621 Seminar in International Politics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 
consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. Examination in depth of selected theories, practices 
and problems of international politics. Petersen 

PS 696 Seminar in Politics. Prerequisite: Advanced graduate standing. 2-4 F. An 
independent advanced research course in selected problems of government and poli- 
tics. The problems will be chosen in accordance with the needs and desires of the 
students registered for the course. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 231 



PS 699 Research in Politics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and approval of ad- 
viser. Credits Arranged F,S. Research for writing of master's thesis. 

Graduate Staff 



Poultry Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor R. E. Cook, Head 

Professors: H. L. Bumgardner, W. E. Donaldson, E. W. Glazener, P. B. Hamil- 
ton, C. H. Hill Jr.; Extension Professor: J. R. Harris; Associate Professors: 
W. M. Col WELL, J. P. Thaxton Jr.; Assistant Professors: D. \L Bricgs, |. D. 
Garlich, W. R. Prince, D. G. Simmons; Extension Assistant Professor: XL H. 
Gehle 

The Department of Poultry Science offers the Master of Science degree in poul- 
try science. Doctoral progriims are offered in the disciplines of microbiology, physi- 
ology, genetics and nutrition. 

The Department of Poultry Science occupies Scott Hiill, a building contiiining 
well-equipped laboratories, animal rooms and offices. Additional research facilities 
are located on the L^niversity farms and the Piedmont Research Station. 

The Dearstyne Avian Health Center, a three-building complex, is used in con- 
nection with special research projects related to disease resistance and treatment of 
various pathological conditions. The complex is made up of animal isolation rooms, 
biochemical laboratories and related facilities. 

The research program is comprehensive and includes fundamental studies in nu- 
trition, physiology, genetics, pathology and microbiology. In addition, investigation 
of problems of more practical urgency is undertaken when appropriate. 

The demand for men and women with advanced training in poultry science is far 
greater than the supply. Opportunities exist for graduates in research in universi- 
ties, in government and in private industry. The extension service is anxious to hire 
properly trained persons in this field. The industry is seeking properly trained 
people to fill management positions. 



FOR .\DVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PO 401 Poultry Diseases. 4(3-3) S. 

PO 402 Commercial Poultry Enterprises. 4(3-3) S. Required of technology and 
business majors in poultry science; elective for others with consent of instructor. 

PO 404 (FS 404) Poultry Products. 3(2-3) F. (See food science, page 152.) 

PO 405 Avian Physiology. Prerequisite: CH 220. 4(3-3) S. 



232 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



PO 415 (ANS 415, NTR 415) Comparative Nutrition. Prerequisite: CH 220 or 
CH 221. 3(3-0) F. 

PO 490 Poultry Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Required of seniors in poultry science. 

PO 495 Special F*roblems in Poultry Science. Prerequisite: Junior standing and 
consent of instructor. 1-6 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PO 520 (ON 520) Poultry Breeding. Prerequisite: GN 411. 3(2-2) F. Application 
of genetic principles to poultry breeding, considering physical traits and physiologi- 
cal characteristics — feather patterns, egg production, hatchability, growth, body 
conformation and utility. Briggs 

PO 524 (ZO 524) Comparative Endocrinology. Prerequisite: ZO 414 (BO 414) or 
ZO 421. 4(3-3) S. Study of the endocrine system with respect to its physiological im- 
portance to metabolism, growth and reproduction. Prince 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PO 698 Special Problems in Poultry Science. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
Maximum 6 F,S. Specific problems of study are assigned in various phases of poul- 
try science. Graduate Staff 

PO 699 Poultry Research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Credits Arranged 
F,S. A maximum of six credits is allowed towards a master's degree. Appraisal of 
present research; critical study of some particular problem involving original 
investigation. Problems in poultry breeding, nutrition, disease, endocrinology, 
hematology or microbiology. Graduate Staff 



Product Design 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Associate Professor V. M. Foote, Acting Head 

Professors: J. H. Cox, C. E. McKinney, D. R. Stuart; Associate Professors: G. L. 
BiREUNE, D. A. Masterton; Assistant Professor: A. V. Cooke 

The Department of Product Design offers programs of study in product and vis- 
ual design leading to the Master of Product Design. 

All students with a four-year undergraduate degree shall be required to complete 
a minimum of 48 hours of course work of which approximately 70 percent will be 
in the major field and the remainder elected from various specialized areas. .-Vll stu- 
dents with a five-year undergraduate degree shall be required to complete a mini- 
mum of 30 hours of course work of which approximately 70 percent will be in the 
major field and the remainder elected fi-om various specialized areas. 

The progriun of course work to be followed by the student and the terminal pro- 
ject is under the direction of the student's graduate committee. The terminiU pro- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 233 



ject shall continue the final test of the candidate's mastery of his design studies. The 
project shall be developed in the design studio or special projects framework in the 
sixth year and shall consist of an in-depth investigation of an approved problem 
which relates product or visual design studies to the student's minor field. Group 
projects, with a maximum of three students collaborating, may be pennitted by spe- 
cial airangement, if the problem to be explored is sufFiciently broad or its nature re- 
quires a wide range of investigation. 

Admission — Applicants for this program may come from the following sources: 

1) Graduates of approved schools of product design. 

2) Graduates of approved progriims of industrial design. 

3) Graduates of accredited schools of engineering. 

4) Graduates of accredited schools of architecture. 

5) Graduates of approved schools of visual design. 

6) Under special circumstances, students with degrees in fields other than de- 
sign. In these latter instances an advisory committee will evaluate the appli- 
cant's preparation with regard to design capabilities and professional com- 
petence. 

In addition, course offerings are available to any graduate student who can de- 
monstrate reasonable competence or equivalent qualifications for prerequisites in 
the requested courses. 

All applicants, in addition to meeting the requirements of the Graduate School, 
must meet the special requirements of the Department of Product Design with re- 
gard to design capabilities and professional competence. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PD 400 Intermediate Product Design (Series). Prerequisite: DN 202 or equivalent 
or consent of department. 4(6-3) F,S. 

PD 411, 412 Applied Physical Principles. Prerequisite: Intermediate design 

standing. 3(2-2) F,S. 

PD 421, 422 Colloquium III, IV. 1(1-0) F,S. 

PD 431, 432 Office and Industrial Practice I, II. 1(1-0) F,S. 

PD 440 Intermediate Visual Design (Series). Prerequisite: DN 202 or equivalent 

or departmental approval. 4(6-3) F,S. 

PD 490 Intermediate Special Projects (Series). 2-4 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PD 501, 502 Product Design V, VI. Prerequisite; PD 400 or graduate standing. 6 
(3-12) F,S. PD 501 — Unlimited production systems designed with object(s) possibili- 
ties produced additively of new synthetic materials utilizing new molecular joining 
for national class and age groups. PD 502 — Unlimited production systems design 
with object(s) possibilities produced additively of new synthetic materials utilizing 
new molecular joining for international class and age groups. (Individually selected 
problems within interdisciplinary team organizations.) NOTE: It shall be assumed 
that the program is cumulative and that these statements are problem parameters, 
exclusive of communication requirements. 



234 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

PD 511, 512 Materials and Processes V, VI. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 2 
(1-3) F,S. Advanced studies in mass production processes and their influence on 
design. Emphasis is placed on material search and process selection in relation to 
cost, function, human factors, form, finishes and joining methods, as indicated by the 
current design projects in which the students are involved. 

PD 532 Office and Industrial Practice. Prerequisite: PD 432 or graduate standing. 
1(1-0) F,S. Advanced studies and procedures of professional product design practice, 
product and industrial planning and patent law. 

PD 541, 542 Advanced Visual Design I, II. Prerequisites: ARC 400, LAR 400, PD 
400 and PD 440; waiver of prerequisite is at the discretion of the instructor. 6(3-9) 
F,S. Application of previous studies in design and visual communications to a wide 
variety of visual problems presented by our physical environment. 

PD 590, 591 Special Projects. 2-4 F,S. Special projects of an interdisciplinary na- 
ture, guided by various faculty specialists involved in areas supplementary to pro- 
duct design. Emphasis placed on latest technological development of new materials. 
Also emphasis on concept of new useful designs for the mass market. The production 
aspects of products such as materials, processes, functions, human factors, form, 
sales appeal, finishing and assembly methods and packaging will be stressed in spe- 
cial project designs. 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PD 601, 602 Advanced Product Design VII, VIII. Prerequisites: PD 501, 502 or 
graduate standing. 6(0-18) F,S. Continuation of PD 501, 502 at an advanced level. 
Unlimited production systems designed with object(s) possibilities produced addi- 
tively of new synthetic materials utilizing new molecular joining for international 
class and age groups. 

PD 631, 632 Advanced Concepts in Product Engineering. Prerequisites: PD 502, 
graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Group investigation of advanced concepts in product 
design with emphasis on engineering. Engineering principles play an important role 
in the design of useful products. The scope of this course will include mass move- 
ment of persons as well as the designs of consumer products. The field of transpor- 
tation and consumer products are fast changing to satisfy the needs of the present 
and future generations. The product designer is to be made aware of these needs by 
special investigations into future technologies and future material developments. 



Psychology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor H. G. Miller, Head 

Professors: H. M. Corter, D. W. Drewes, J. C. Johnson, S. E. Newman, R. G. 
Pearson; Professor Emeritus: K. L. Rarkley; Visiting Professor: R. G. 
Hayden; Associate Professors: J. L. Cole, J. W. Cunningham, T. E. 
LeVere, J. Magill, R. a. Norton, J. L. Wasik, R. W. Westbrook; 
Adjunct Associate Professors: Margaret N. Wiebe, R. W. Oppenheim; 
Assistant Professors: J. E. R. Luginbuhl, D. H. Mershon, Rachel F. Rawls, 
F. J. Smith; Adjunct Assistant Professor: RrendaC. Rall 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 235 

The Department of Psychology offers courses of study leading to the Master of 
Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Specialization in community clinical 
psychology, experimental psychology, human factors engineering, social psychol- 
ogy, school psychology and human resource development is available. 

A minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate credit is required for the master's 
degree. Though no minimum number of additional hours is required for the doc- 
toral degree, the student may expect to take 30 or more additional semester hours 
of graduate credit. In any case, both for master's and doctoriil candidates, the 
actual graduate program for each student is determined on the basis of individual 
needs, interests and accomplishments. Admission requirements for the beginning 
graduate student in the Department of Psychology are: satisfactory grades in all 
undergraduate work and at least a "B" average in undergraduate psychology 
courses and in the undergraduate major; satisfactory scores on the Graduate Re- 
cord Examination (including the advanced test in psychology for undergraduate 
psychology majors, or, for non-psychology majors, the advanced test in the under- 
graduate major) and the Miller Analogies Test; and three satisfactory letters of re- 
commendation in regard to quality of work and character. It is possible to enter 
the program without undergraduate coursework in psychology but, as a general 
rule, some preparation in experimental psychology, statistics and mathematics is 
desirable. 

Admission requirements for students already possessing the master's degree who 
wish to obtain the doctorate in psychology are: a minimum of a "B" average in 
their graduate work and a substantial background in psychology or related fields; 
satisfactory grades in undergraduate studies; satisfactory scores on the Graduate 
Record Examination including the advanced test in psychology (if the applicant's 
master's degree is in a field other than psychology, he should also submit the 
advanced score in that field and the Miller Analogies Test; and three satisfactory 
letters of recommendation in regiird to quality of work and character. 

Research and teaching assistantships and fellowships are available to qualified 
graduate students. The assistantships are usuiilly based on one-third time assign- 
ments but are occasioniUly for one-half time. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PSY 411 Social Psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 200. 3(3-0) S. 

PSY 475 Child Psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304. 3(3-0) S. 

PSY 476 Adolescent Psychology. Prerequisite: PSY 200 or PSY 304. 2(2-0) F.S. 

PSY 491, 492 Seminar in Psychology. Prerequisites: Senior standing, consent of 
department. 3(3-0) F,S. 

PSY 493 Special Topics in Psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1-6 
F.S. 

PSY 495 Human Resource Development Practicum. Prerequisites: Junior stand- 
ing, PSY HRD option; PSY 350, PSY 351, PSY 352, SP 231. 8(0-8) F,S. 



236 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

PSY 500 Perception. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(2-2) S. The first half of 
the course will be a summary and analysis of the major classes of variables affect- 
ing perception. The data will be examined in the context of the development of the- 
ories of perception with emphasis on the general problem of scientific method and 
theory construction as well as the specific content of perceptual theory. The second 
half of the course will summarize and analyze the major modes of thinking and the 
variables affecting the thinking process. Special emphasis will be placed on the re- 
lationship between perception and thinking, and number of the theories of thinking 
will be evaluated. Mershon, Newman 

PSY 502 Physiological Psychology. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of psychology, 
including PSY 200, PSY 300, PSY 310. 3(3-0) F. A survey of the physiological bases 
of behavior including the study of coordination, sensory processes, brain function, 
emotions and motivation. LeVere 

PSY 503 (ZO 503) Comparative Psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 310 and BS 100 

or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. Covers the history of the study of the comparative 
behavior of organisms; methodological and theoretical problems peculiar to com- 
parative psychology, with emphasis on the ontogeny and evolution of behavior in 
vertebrate animals. 

PSY 504 Advanced Educational Psychology. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychol- 
ogy. 3(3-0) F,S. A critical appraisal of current psychological findings that are rele- 
vant to educational practice and theory. Johnson 

PSY 510 Learning and Motivation. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,. 
A systematic analysis of some of the major classes of variables determining behav- 
ioral change. Learning variables are analyzed within their primary experimental 
setting, and emphasis is upon the diversity of the functions governing behavior 
change rather than upon the development of some comprehensive theory. Both 
learning and motivational variables are examined as they contribute to changes in 
performance within the experimental setting. Cole, Newman, Pearson 

PSY 511 .Advanced Social Psychology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent 
of instructor. 3(3-0) S. A survey of theory and research in social psychology through 
reading and discussion of primary source materials. In addition, the course will 
deal with issues of methodology, ethical questions in social psycholog:ical research 
and application of research findings to the world at large. Luginbuhl 

PSY 514 Logical Foundations of Behavioral .Analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing in psychology. 3(3-0) F. An analysis of fundamental considerations involv- 
ed in the formulation and verification of theories of behavior. Such topics as opera- 
tionalism, formalism, reductionism, logical analysis and the nature of truth in em- 
pirical sciences will be introduced and related to research in various areas of psy- 
chological interest. The objectives are to provide insight into the nature of scientific 
research, to foster the ability to derive empirical, hypotheses, to develop facility in 
designing experimental tests of hypotheses, and to promote effective writing and 
speaking about psychological theory and experimentation. Drewes 

PSY 520 Cognitive Processes. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(2-2) F. This 
course will emphasize the results from research on a number of complex processes 
(e.g., remembering, concept learning, acquisition and use of language) and the the- 
ories that have been proposed to explain these results. Newman 

PSY 530 Abnormal Psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 200, PSY 302. 3(3-0) S. A 
study of the causes, symptomatic behavior and treatment of the major personality 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 237 



disturbances. Emphasis will be placed on theory, experimental psychopathology and 
preventive measures. Corter, Wiebe 

PSY 531 (ED 531) Mental Deficiency. 3(3-0) S.Sum. (See education, page 126.) 

PSY 532 Psychological Aspects of Exceptionality. F'rerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 3(3-0) S,Sum. The course is designed to give consideration to effects of 
severe deficiency (sensory, physical, mental, etc.) arising from any causes at any 
stage of life; the personal and social ramifications of these; and possible courses of 
intervention; as well as utilization of psychological theory and clinical information 
in interpreting probable implications. Research findings related to sensory depri- 
vation, research needs and possible research projects will be discussed. Rawls 

PSY 535 Tests and Measurements. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology. 3(3-0) 
F,S. A study of the principles of psychological testing including norms and units of 
measurement, elementary statistical concepts, reliability and validity. In addition, 
some attention is devoted to the major types of available tests such as general intel- 
lectual development, tests of separate abilities, achievement tests, measures of per- 
sonality and interest inventories. Westbrook 

PSY 540 (IE 540) Human Factors in Systems Design. 3(3-0) S. (See industrial 
engineering, page 172.) 

PSY 545 Fundamentals of Skill. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) Alter- 
nate F. Fundamentals of human perceptual, cognitive, and sensory-motor abilities 
that are basic to skilled performance. Treatment of such topics as channel capacity, 
short-term memory, stress, fatigue, arousal theory, task taxonomy, skill acquisition, 
proficiency decrement, information feedback, and performance analysis. Problems of 
attention, search, monitoring, tracking, complex tasks, and skill maintenance. 

PSY 565 Organizational Psychology. Prerequisite: Nine hours of psychology. 3 
(3-0) S. A study of the application of behavioral science, particularly psychology and 
social psychology, to organizational and management problems. Miller 

PSY 570 Theories of Personality. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) F. A 
review of theories of personality, with emphasis on research, application in psycho- 
therapy and measurement, and principles involved in similarities and differences 
among them. Corter 

PSY 571 Individual Intelligence Measurement. Prerequisite: PSY 570. 3(3-0) S. A 
practicum in individual intelligence testing with emphasis on the Wechsler Belle- 
vue, Stanford-Binet, report writing and case studies. 

PSY 576 Developmental Psychology. Prerequisite: Nine hours of psychology, in- 
cluding PSY 475 or PSY 476. 3(3-0) F. A survey of the role of growth and develop- 
ment in human behavior, particularly during the child and adolescent periods. This 
course will pay particular attention to basic principles and theories in the area of 
developmental psychology. Johnson 

PSY 578 Individual Differences. Prerequisite: Six hours of psychology. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Nature, extent and practical implications of individual differences and individual 
variation. Graduate Staff 

PSY 591 Area Seminar in Clinical-Community I'sychology. Prerequisite: Consent 
of instructor. 1-3, Maximum 6. F,S. The following topics will be dealt with: (1) the 
development of clinical-community psychology as an area of study, (2) methods of 
inquiry, (3) contemporary issues, (4) ethical questions, (5) relationship to other 
areas within psychology. Graduate Staff 



238 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



PSY 592 Area Seminar in Experimental Psychology. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing in psychology. 1-3, Maximum 6. F,S. The following topics will be dealt with: 
(1) the development of experimental psychology as an area of inquiry, (2) methods of 
inquiry, (3) contemporary issues, (4) ethical questions, (5) relationship to other 
areas within psychology. Graduate Staff 

PSY 593 Area Seminar in Human Factors Engineering. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing. 1-2, Maximum 3. F,S. Introduction to human factors engineering as an 
area of study; historical aspects; contemporary issues; ethical questions; overview 
of campus research, facilities and courses in the area; consideration of information 
sources, financial support for research proposals and employment opportunities. 

Pearson 

PSY 594 Area Seminar in Human Resources Development. Prerequisite: Consent 
of instructor. 1-3, Maximum 6. F,S. The following topics will be dealt with: (1) hu- 
man resources development as an area of inquiry, (2) methods of inquiry, (3) con- 
temporary issues, (4) ethical questions, (5) relationship to other areas within psy- 
chology. Graduate Staff 

PSY 595 Area Seminar in School Psychology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
1-3, Maximum 6. F,S. The following topics will be dealt with: (1) the development of 
school psychology as a professional area, (2) methods of inquiry, (3) scientific and 
theoretical bases, (4) contemporary issues, (5) ethical questions, (6) relationship to 
other areas within psychology. Graduate Staff 

PSY 596 Area Seminar in Social Psychology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
1-3, Maximum 6. F,S. This course will deal with the following topics: (1) a survey of 
areas within social psychology, (2) methods of inquiry, (3) contemporary issues, (4) 
ethical questions, (5) the relation of social psychology to other branches of psychol- 
ogy, to other disciplines, and to society and its problems. Graduate Staff 

PSY 599 Research Problems in Psychology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 
Credits Arranged. F,S. Research project for graduate students supervised by mem- 
bers of the graduate faculty. Research to be elected on basis of interest of student, 
and is not to be part of thesis or dissertation research. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

PSY 602 F^hysiological Psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 502 and/or consent of in- 
structor. 3(3-0) S. Psychology 602 is the sequel to Psychology 502 and will concen- 
trate on relating the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology studied in PSY 502 to 
overt observable behaviors such as sleep-waking, motivation-emotion, and reflexive 
and learned behaviors. LeVere 

PSY 603 Verbal Learning and Verbal Behavior. Prerequisites: PSY 510, PSY 514. 
3(3-0) S. This course will provide opportunity for exploration in depth of verbal- 
learning research studying acquisition, transfer and retention and the theories that 
have been proposed to explain the results of this research. Implications of findings 
from verbal-learning research for understanding concept learning, problem-solving 
and the acquisition and use of language will also be explored. Newman 

PSY 604 Classical Conditioning. Prerequisites: PSY 510, PSY 514. 3(3-0) F. The 
origins of classical conditioning theory and methodology will be traced from Seche- 
nov, Bechterev and Pavlov through the recent Russian and American work. The in- 
fluence of the classical conditioning paradigm on American psychology as expressed 
in learning theory and the conditioning therapies will be examined. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 239 



PSY 605 Instrumental Learning. Prerequisites: PSY 510, PSY 514. 3(3-0) S. A 
systematic analysis of various experimental techniques and alternative data lan- 
guages for the study of instrumental learning. Primary orientation will be upon 
what is happening in the experimental situation rather than upon theoretical expla- 
nations of the data. Special problems, for example, discrimination, avoidance chain- 
ing and reinforcement schedules, will be studied in depth. Various models for de- 
scription of the data will be compared with special emphasis upon mathematical 
learning models. Cole 

PSY 607 .\dvanced Industrial Psychology I. Prerequisite: Nine hours of psychol- 
ogy and statistics or concurrent with statistics. 3(3-0) S. Application of scientific 
methods to the measurement and understanding of industrial behavior. 

Drewes, Miller 

PSY 608 Advanced Industrial Psychology II. Prerequisite: PSY 607. 3(3-0) F. Ap- 
plication of scientific methods to the measurement and understanding of industrial 
behavior. Drewes, Miller 

PSY 610 Theories of Learning. Prerequisites: PSY 510, PSY 514. 3(3-0) F or S. 
The objectives of this course are to promote learning of the theories currently used 
to explain how learning and forgetting occur so that testable consequences of these 
theories can be derived and so that the theories and their testable consequences are 
capably written and spoken about. Cole, Newman 

PSY 611 Social Psychology: Small Groups Research. Prerequisite: PSY 511. 3 
(3-0) S. Factors that determine the pattern of interaction within small groups will 
be examined. Some factors to be consideied are social norms, roles, communication 
networks, power and status hierarchies and types of leadership. Conformity behav- 
ior, affiliative behavior and techniques of interpersonal influence will also be ana- 
lyzed. The role of interpersonal perception and individual differences in social be- 
havior will be examined. Luginbuhl 

PSY 635 Psychological Measurement. Prerequisites: ST 507, 511 or equivalent, 12 
hours of psychology. 3(3-0) F. Theory of psychological measurement. Statistical 
problems and techniques in test construction. Cunningham, Drewes 

PSY 640 (IE 640) Skilled Operator Performance. 3(3-0) S. (See industrial engi- 
neering, page 173.) 

PSY 672 Personality Measurement. Prerequisite: PSY 570, PSY 571. 3(2-3) S. 
Theory and practicum in individual personality testing of children and adults with 
emphasis on projective techniques, other personality measures, report writing and 
case studies. Corter 

PSY 674 Psychological Intervention I. Prerequisite: PSY 672, PSY 530 and ap- 
proval of instructor. 3(2-2) F. This course is designed to examine theories, research, 
techniques, ethics and professional responsibilities related to approaches to psycho- 
logical intervention. Types of psychological intervention to be studied will include 
behavior modification, milieu approaches, crisis intervention techniques and group 
process methods, in addition to more intensi\>e relationship approaches. A close inte- 
gration of experiences, content and supervision will be emphasized in a variety of 
professional settings with a wide range of personal problems and age groups. 

Norton 

PSY 675 Psychological Intervention II. Prerequisite: PSY 674. 3(2-2) S. The pri- 
mary purpose of this course is to provide students opportunities to acquire informa- 
tion, conceptual frameworks, interpersonal skilFs and a sense of ethical responsibi- 



240 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



lity, all of which are basic to their further development as practicing psychologists. 
A major effort in the course is made to help the student increase his interpersonal 
skills as a means of promoting the psychological growth and effectiveness of others. 

Norton 

I'SY 690 Seminar in Industrial Psychology. 3(3-0) F,S. Scientific articles, analysis 
of experimental designs in industrial psychology and study of special problems of 
interest to graduate students in industrial psychology. Drewes, Miller 

I'SY 691 Special Topics in Psychology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, consent 
of instructor. 1-3 F,S. Course will provide opportunity for exploration in depth of 
advanced topical areas which, because of their degree of specialization, are not gen- 
erally involved in other courses, for example, multivariate methodology in psychol- 
ogy, computer simulation, mathematical model building. Some new 600-level courses 
will first be offered under this title during the developmental phase and as such may 
involve lectures and/or laboratories. Graduate Staff 

PSY 693 Psychological Clinic Practicum. Prerequisite: Nine hours in psychology. 
Maximum 12 F,S. Clinical participation in interviewing, counseling, psychotherapy 
and administration of psychological tests. Practicum to be concerned with adults 
and children. Corter 

F»SY 696 Advanced Problems in Perception. Prerequisites: PSY 500, PSY 514. 3 
(2-2) F. Advanced topics in perception will be the subject matter of this course. Top- 
ics will include a survey and analysis of contemporary trends in perceptual research 
and theory. Mershon 

PSY 697 (ED 697) Advanced Seminar in Research Design. 3(3-0) S. (See educa- 
tion, page 133.) 

PSY 699 Thesis and Dissertation Research. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, 
consent of instructor. Credits Arranged F,S. Individual or group research problems; 
a maximum of six credits is allowed toward the master's degree, but any number 
toward the Ph.D. degree. Graduate Staff 



Recreation Resources Administration 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor T. 1. Hi.nes, I lead 

Professor: W. E. Smith; Associate Professors: G. A. Hammon, L. L. Miller, R. E. 
Sternloff; M. R. Warren |r. 

The Department of Recreation Resources Administration offers programs of stndy 
leading to the Master of Science and Master of Recreation Resources degrees. The 
programs are based on an interdisciplinary approach and are designed to meet the 
problems and opportunities posed bv changing social forces which affect the recre- 
ation profession. Students pursuing these degrees will have an opportunity to de- 
velop an understanding of the relationship Ix'tween recreation and disciplines such 
as forestry, wildlife management, horticulture, landscape design, conseivation, eco- 
nomics, politics, sociology and anthropology. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 241 



The Master of Science degree is designed to enhance in advanced students schol- 
arly development and a more adecjuate comprehension of the re(piirements and re- 
sponsibilities essential for independent research. A student will he required to com- 
plete a minimum of 30 hours of graduate work. The program will consist of a major 
and minor field of study- The minor may be concentrated wholly in a different dis- 
cipline or may consist of courses selected from the offering of two departments. In 
either case, the minor field must constitute a unified pattern and must contribute 
to the student's education in the major field. A high degiee of flexibilitv is main- 
tained to peimit each .student's program to be structured to meet individual needs. 

Each candidate for the Master of Science degree will be required to complete a 
thesis representing an original investigation as a part of the minimum requirements 
for the degree. 

The Master of Recreation Resources degree is designed for students who are 
interested in the more advanced applications of administrative principles in special- 
ized areas of the recreation field. Students for this degree will usually teiminate 
their graduate progriun upon completion of the master's degree. Requirements for 
the Master of Recreation Resources degree include a minimum of 36 hours of 
course work, and in lieu of a thesis, the student will be required to complete a de- 
partmental course in research and a problem report. 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

RRA 440 Recreation Resource Inventory and Planning. Prerequisite: RRA 241. 3 
(2-2) F,S. 

RRA 441 Recreation Resource Development. Prerequisite: RRA 241. 3(3-0) F,S. 

RRA 442 Wildland Recreation Environments. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3 
(2-3) F,S. 

RRA 451 Facility and Site Planning. Prerequisites: RRA 215 and RRA 216. 3(0-6) 
F,S. 

RRA 453 Administrative Policies and Procedures. Prerequisite: RRA 359. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 

RRA 454 Recreation and Park Finance. Prerequisites: Six hours recreation re- 
sources administration courses, senior standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 

RRA 491 Special Problems in Recreation. Prerequisite: Consent of department. 3 
(2-2) F.S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

RRA 500 Theories of Leisure and Recreation. Prerequisite: Nine hours of RR.\ 
courses. 3(3-0). Analysis of leisure and recreation and a study of their origin and de- 
velopment as revealed by man's behavioral patterns. Interpretation of the influence 
and social significance of leisure and recreation concepts on contemporary .American 
culture and their implications on future recreation thought and action. Warren 



242 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



^nr fii ^T??^'■^T. •*"?*". in Recreation Research. Prerequisites: ST 311 and 

SOC 416 4(3-2). Review of the historical emphasis of recreation research with 
analyses of various approaches to research design and model building. Examination 
of the philosophy of social scientific investigation, and possible application of exist- 
ing behavioral theory to recreation research with a special emphasis on efforts to 
develop theory useful in explaining use of leisure time. Graduate Staff 

RRA 538 Recreation for Special Populations. 3(3-0). Emphasis on the leisure con- 
cerns of deprived groups with exposure to the status, problems, and community ser- 
vice needs of special populations found in most American communities. Special pop- 
ulations include the physically disabled, the mentally retarded, the aging and the 
economically deprived. ^ St I ff 

RRA 591 Recreation Resources Problems. Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate 
or graduate status. 1-4. Assigned or selected problems in the field of recreation 
administration, planning, supervision, maintenance, operations, financing or 
program. Special research problems selected on basis of interest of students' and 
supervised by members of the graduate faculty. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

RRA 691 Seminar in Recreation Administrative Policies. Prerequisite- RRA 501 
L^^n'J H^" ^^^'^^^ ^^^^f ^^ ^«"^«^ i" administrative principles; students do in- 
dividual and group research, under supervision, in specific administrative categor- 
ies of study in the field of recreation. Independent study and research required of 
students who must develop written and oral presentations for critical analyses by 
graduate students and faculty. <»'>»«:;» uy 



Hines 



RRA 692 Advanced Problems in Recreation. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of RR^V 
XTt'h !i" Arranged. Directed research in a specialized phase of recreation 

othei than a thesis problem. Graduate Staff 

CrjLl^l Research in Recreation. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of RRA courses 
credits Arranged. Original research preliminary to writing a master's thesis. 



Graduate Staff 



Sociology and Anthropology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 
Professor S. C. Mayo, Head 

Professors: L. W. Drabick, G. C. UcCANN-T.raduatc Administrator, C. P. Marsh 
J. N. Young; Extcmion Professor: ]. D. George; Professor Emeritus C. H 
Hamilton; Ass(Kiate Professors: W. B. Clifford II, A. C. Davis C V 
Mercer, R. D. Mustian. H. D. Rawls, M. M. Sawhney, Euzabeth M. 
SuvAL, O. Uzzell; Extension Associate Professor: M. E. Voland- Visitinn 
Associate Professor: H. D. Holder; Assistant Professors: R. C. Brisson, C. G. 
Dawson, G. L. Faulkner, H. L. Moxley, G. S. Nickerson, D. J. Steffens- 
MEiER, R. C. Wimberley; AdjuHct Assistant Professor: J. L. Franklin- Ex- 
tension Assistant Professor: C. E. Lewis 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 243 

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology offers a program of study lead- 
ing to the Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major in sociology. The department 
also hiis programs leading to the Master of Sociology degree (nonthesis) with a ma- 
jor in sociology and the Master of Science degree with a major in rural sociology. 
The cuniculum includes several major areas of interest: commimity and area devel- 
opment; demography; planned change; social change and development; iind devi- 
ancy and rehabilitation. The core progriim includes sociologies theory, research 
methods and quantitative analysis. Special attention is given in the curriculum to 
the development of sociological skills involved in an understanding of social factors 
and public policies as they affect regioniil, national and international development. 

Graduate students on assistantships and fellowships are usually provided with 
office space and equipment. ComputatiouiU facilities are available for students 
whose research problems involve extensive analyses of data as well as for those 
students who want to learn to do their own programming. Computing facilities 
available to students and faculty in the department are described on page 22. 

The department has the responsibilitv for a state-wide progriim in community 
and area development. This provides an excellent laboratory for both personal ob- 
servation and research, and graduate students are encouraged to use the facilities 
and other resources of this program in extended education. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ANT 511 Anthropological Theory. Prerequisites: Six hours sociology, ANT 252 
and ANT 305 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. This course approaches anthropological theory 
from both an historical and contemporary point of view. The central concern is with 
the key anthropological concept of culture and its significance for understanding 
man and his works. Graduate Staff 

.ANT 512 Applied Anthropology. Prerequisite: ANT 252 or consent of instructor. 3 
(3-0) F,S. The course includes a review of the historical development of applied an- 
thropology and a study of anthropology as applied in government, industry, com- 
munity development, education and medicine. The processes of culture change are 
analyzed in terms of the application of anthropological techniques to programs of 
developmental change. Graduate Staff 

SOC 501 (ED 501) Leadership. Prerequisite: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F.S.A 
study of leadership in various fields of American life; analysis of the various factors 
associated with leadership; techniques of leadership. Particular attention is given 
to recreational, scientific and executive leadership procedures. Young 

SOC 502 Society, Culture and Personality. Prerequisite: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3 
(3-0) F,S. Human personality is studied from its origins in primary groups through 
its development in secondary contacts and its ultimate integration with social 
norms. While comparative anthropological materials will be drawn upon, emphasis 
is placed upon the normal personality and the adjustment of the individual to our 
society and to our culture. Dynamics of personality and character structure are ana- 
lyzed in terms of the general culture patterns and social institutions of society. 

Uzzell 

SOC 503 Contemporary Sociology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 
The basic purpose of this course is to provide the student with an overview of the 



244 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

current status of sociological theory and research. It will introduce the student to 
contemporary sociological thinking and research and provide a base for further 
graduate training in the discipline. "^^s^ lor rurtner 

Marsh 

v^tnt^^^'^i^^^'rf 'a" '" ^^'l.^'-" Sofi ety. Prerequisites: SOC 202, SOC 301, or equi- 
valent. 3(3-0) F,S An analysis ot education using basic sociological concepts Varv- 
Unit^'stT'." ' '' P fed upon the historical development^f education in the 
Lnited States cross-cultural comparisons of educational structure and function 
cItLn X iro'r ^^"^^^«^^' investigation of the ecological factors affecting edu 
^nJI' gi-oup processes upon learning, and the effects of social professes 

and changes upon the educational institution. Diabick 

SOC .505 The Sociology of Rehabilitation I. Prerequisite: Graduate standing- and/ 
or consent ot instructor. 3(3-0) F. The area of disSility of handicap s rntroduced 
from a conceptual and theoretical standpoint. Sociological and socialpsychScal 
aspects ot handicaps, the rehabilitation processes, and rehabilitative orSzSns 
are stressed throughout. Particular attention is given to rehabilitation of the sodol- 
EfLtr'; V^" rehabilitation processes. Socio-cultural factors in disabiHty and 
handicap (residence, social class, family relationships, etc.) are analyzed in depth 

Rawls 

SOC 506 The Sociology of Rehabilitation II. Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
and or consent ot instructor. 3(3-0) S. Students will be expected to engage in indivi 
tattlrr^' P^^J^l^^ «" ^ ^P^^'«^ handicap, a rehabilitation process ofarekabi^ - 
tative agency or subagency. An attempt will be made through lectures and discus- 
procLr whUe t ?''"' P.^^P.^^'- concerning the actual work of reh'bllitat ^nfn 
process while he is pursuing his specialized interest. Emphasis will be placed on 

s'TalThtror '"' '"'"^"^^ ^^^''^^•'•^ '"^ ^^^ ''^'y «f the above aspects o" 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 509 Population Problems. Prerequisite: SOC 202 or equivalent 3(3^) F A 
study of population growth, rates of change and distribution. Considerable attention 
s given to the functional roles of population, i.e., age, sex, race, residence occupa- 
tion marital status and education. The dynamic aspects of popu ation are kressed- 
fertility, mortality and migration. Population policy is analyzed in relation to n a 
tional and international goals. A world view is stressed throughout Clifford 

SOC 510 Industrial Sociology. Prerequisite: SOC 202 or equivalent 3(3-0) F S 
ndustnal relations are analyzed as group behavior with a complex and dynamfc 
network of rights, obligations, sentiments and rules. This social system is view^ as 
indrtrtaur l:f sfu'j" ?■ '^'^^ 'T'^r? ''''• ^'^ background andTunction'S of 
l^'ndu't'y Tre ana^^^^^^^^^^ " ''"'' '"' ^"^'"'•^' Phenomena. Specific social problLs 

M ercer 

SOC 511 Sociological Theory. Prerequisites: Six hours in sociology and graduate 

selected cases of research ,n which theory and method are classically combined. 

Sawhney 

SOC 512 Family Analysis. Prerequisite: SOC 202 or equivalent V^-Ci) F Thi« 

within 'l^T'\'''' '"^'^ theoretical and methodologicaTfrL eworkTn ocio^ogy 
within which contemporary family research is conduct^!. Merc!r 

^^ 3(3^5^F\-n!^L ^r""""**^ Organization. Prerequisite: SOC 202 or equiva- 
sirlble chin.;i« ^ ^ organization is viewed as a process of bringing about de- 

sirable changes in community life. Community needs and resource? available to 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 245 



meet these needs are studied. Democratic processes in community action and prin- 
ciples of community organization are stressed, along with techniques and proce- 
dures. The roles of leaders, both lay and professional, in community ^evelopmen^t^are 
analyzed. 

SOC 514 Developing Societies. Prerequisites: Six hours of sociology or anthro- 
pology or graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. The pui-pose of this course is to dehne the ma- 
jor problems posed for development sociology and to explore the sociologica bar- 
riers and theoretical solutions for development set forth with special regard to the 
newly-developing countries. Significant past strategies will be reviewed as well as 
main themes in ?un-ent development schemes. Finally, some untested strategies for 
the future will be proposed for discussion. These problems will be examined in thar 
national and international contexts. 

SOC 515 Deviant Behavior. Prerequisites: Six hours of sociology or anthropology 
or graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. Many topics include: the inevitability of deviance 
and its social utility; cross-cultural variations in appearance and behavioral cues 
for labeline the deviate; descriptive and explanatory approaches to kinds and 
founts of^devi^nce in contemporary American society; social change, anomie and 
^cial d sc^-gamzation theories; the process of stigmatization; ormal and intorma 
societal responses to deviance and the deviate; social action implications. Suval 

SOC 517 (PS 517) The Police Bureaucracy in Democratic Society. 3(3-0) S. (See 
political science, page 228.) 

SOC 523 Sociological Analysis of Agricultural Land Tenure Systems Prerequi- 
site Three hours of sociology. 3(3-0) F. A systematic sociological analysis of he 
malor a^icultural and land-tenure systems of the world with major emphasis on the 
problems of family farm ownership and tenance in the United States. ^^^^^^^^ g^^.^ 

SOC 533 Theory of Human Communication Behavior Prer^uiskes: Six hours 
..nrioloev or social psychology and graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. This course is or 
^^nS to Introduce studenfs to thJ behavioral science approach to an understand- 
fngot human Communication. Communication is treated as a basic soc. a ps,^^^^^^^^ 
ical process in which communication events are analyzed '" te.ms o the'r ettects oj^ 

catLnrommun,cat,o„ 'behavior i. treated as a mediatm. "-"an.sm ,n^sc..al m^ 

teraction. 

SOC 534 Agricultural Organizations and Movements. Prerequisites: Three hours 

ernment programs and present problems. 

SOC 54, social Systems and .Manned ^ V"^:;;n;rriSl!"h?;?nXr\°?ft°'h 

o/Q n\ T? Q An pvam nation ot social systems wnnin mt- u <uii«r 
?u'n'ctS'th;orA"nd ™nmctt°he„ry with particular e.phasi. upon system change 
and the planning of social change. 
SOC 555 social S.ra.inca,ion.l;rerequisit^. Six hours s.^^^^^^ 



246 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



tion. Emphasis would be on the static and dynamic qualities of stratification sys- 
tems in rural and urban-industrial societies as well as the effects of these systems 
on relations within and between societies. Particular attention will be paid to the 
integrative and divisive quality of stratification as it is expressed in life styles, 
world views, etc. Davis 

SOC 560 Racial and Cultural Contacts. Prerequisite: Six hours of sociology or 
consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. The course is organized in three sequential sections, 
the first of which deals with inter^oup relation as a legitimate concern of the social 
sciences. The second consists of an appraisal of cross-cultural data that have been 
drawn from a variety of situations within race and ethnicity figure in a significant 
manner. Finally, an effort is made to interpret data by delineating observable pat- 
terns, trends, and relationships. Graduate Staff 

SOC 565 Sociology and General Systems Theory. Prerequisites: Six hours of 
sociology, one course in statistics. 3(3-0) F. In this course the student will study the 
basis of general systems theory and review its application in the field of sociology. 
Emphasis is placed on the philosophical nature of systems theory and its potential 
as an alternative conceptualization to mechanistic and organisimic models. Attention 
is given to the underlying basis of systems theory; to cybernetics as models of 
change and control; learning and equilibrium; to information theory as models of 
choice and selection; to decision theory; and to game theory. Holder 

SOC 570 Commitment. Prerequisite: Six hours of sociology. 3(3-0) F. The process 
of commitment and its strength are covered fi-om several theoretical views as 
applicable to collective behavior, social movements, the sociology of religion, politi- 
cal sociology, deviance, attitudes, decision making, dissonance, structural effects 
and other topics. An aim is to construct propositions and testable models of the 
commitment process. Wimberley 

SOC 574 (EC 574) The Economics of Population. 3(3-0) S. (See economics, 
page 111.) 

SOC 590 Applied Research. Prerequisite: SOC 202 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. A 
study of the research process with particular emphasis upon its application of action 
problems. The development of research design to meet action research needs receives 
special attention. Graduate Staff 

SOC 591 Special Topics in Sociology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 6(6-0) 
F,S. An examination of current problems in sociology organized on a lecture-dis- 
cussion basis. The content of the course will vary as changing conditions require 
the use of new approaches to deal with the emerging problems. Graduate Staff 

SOC 592 Demographic Structure and Processes. Prerequisite: SOC 509 or equi- 
valent. 3(3-0) S. The basic purpose of this course is to provide the student an op- 
portunity to explore, in depth, the major demographic variables (size, composition 
and distribution) and basic demographic processes (fertility, mortality and migra- 
tion). Attention will be given both to theoretical and methodological considerations 
as well as to current substantive knowledge. The specific content of the course will 
vary from semester to semester depending on the needs and interests of the stu- 
dents. Clifford, Mustian 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

SOC 601 Urban Ecology. Prerequisite: SOC 509. 3(3-0) S. The course involves an 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 247 



historical approach to the development of the field as well as an analysis of the 
present state of the field. Because of the range of subject matter subsumed under 
the topic of ecology, the linkages between sociology and other disciplines concerning 
themselves with the subject will be delineated and examined. Davis 

SOC 611 Research Methods in Sociology. Prerequisites: SOC 416, ST 311 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Designed to give the student a mature insight into the nature 
of scientific research in sociology. Assesses the nature and purpose of research 
designs, the interrelationship of theory and research, the use of selected techniques 
and their relation to research designs, and the use of modern tabulation equipment 
in research. McCann 

SOC 613 Theory of Mass Communication. Prerequisite: SOC 533 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) S. This course provides the advanced student in the social sciences with an 
opportunity to examine the emerging body of theory and research in the field of 
mass communications. Course content will treat: (1) the systems character of mass 
communication, (2) social communication at the individual and group level, (3) 
persuasive communication and social control, (4) communication and opinion change, 
and (5) communication and societal development. In addition to the theoretical 
and methodological underpinnings drawn from the behavioral sciences, the course 
will examine contributions from the communication arts and applied communica- 
tions. Graduate Staff 

SOC 621 Social Psychology. Prerequisite: Six hours of sociology. 3(3-0) S. The 
objective of this course is to present the major ideas of social psychology in the 
context of the theoretical orientations from which they have emerged. The nature 
and role of theory in social psychology are examined. The social psychologies of 
various theorists are then examined in terms of their particular approaches including 
the Gestalt, Field, Role, Psychoanalytic, and Reinforcement orientations and 
combinations of these. McCann 

SOC 631 Population Analysis. Prerequisite: Six hours of sociology. 3(3-0) S. 
Methods of describing, analyzing and presenting data on human populations: dis- 
tribution, characteristics, natural increase, migration and trends in relation to 
resources. Graduate Staff 

SOC 632 Sociology of the Family. Prerequisite: Six hours of sociology. 3(3-0) S. 
Emphasis is placed on the development of an adequate sociological frame of reference 
for family analysis; on discovering both the uniquely cultural and common-human 
aspects of the family by means of cross-cultural comparisons; on historical explana- 
tions for variability in American families with special concern for the family; and 
on analyzing patterns of family stability and effectiveness. Graduate Staff 

SOC 633 The Community. Prerequisite: Six hours of sociology. 3(3-0) S. The com- 
munity is viewed in sociological perspective as a functioning entity. A method of 
analysis is presented and applied to eight "dimensions," with emphasis on the unique 
types of understanding to be derived from measuring each dimension. Finally, the 
effect of change on community integration and development is analyzed. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 641 Statistics in Sociology. Prerequisite: ST 513 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 
The application of statistical methods of sociological research. Emphasis on selecting 
appropriate models, instruments and techniques for the more frequently encountered 
problems and forms of data. Mustian 



248 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



SOC 645 Advanced Sociological Measurement. Prerequisites: SOC 611, ST 511 or 
ST 513. 3(3-0) S. Various issues concerning the measurement of social variables 
are examined and techniques are described. These issues and techniques include 
operationalism and epistemic correlation, levels of measurement, transformations, 
social indicators, scaling, dimensionality, validity, and reliability. Existing 
examples and potential applications in sociological research are considered. 

Wimberley 

SOC 646 Advanced Sociological Analysis. Prerequisites: SOC 611, ST 511 or ST 
513. 3(3-0) S. Advanced analysis techniques adaptable to the needs of sociological 
research are examined. Special attention is given to causal analysis, the analysis of 
change, and aggregate versus individual level data analyses. Sociological examples 
are considered. Emerging issues and techniques are given attention. Wimberley 

SOC 652 Comparative Societies. Prerequisite: Six hours of sociology. 3(3-0) S. 
Sociological analysis of societies around the world with particular reference to 
North and South America. Special emphasis is given to cultural and physical 
setting, population composition, levels of living, relationship of the people to the 
land, structure and function of the major institutions and forces making for change. 

Graduate Staff 

SOC 653 Theory and Development of Sociology. Prerequisites: SOC 511, consent 
of instructor. 3(3-0) S. Detailed analysis of methodological and substantive problems 
in utilizing sociological theories in varied areas, and an examination of events and 
trends in the development of sociology. Graduate Staff 

SOC 670 Theories of Population. Prerequisites: SOC 509 and/or SOC 511 or 
permission of instructor. 3(3-0) F. This course provides an overview of population 
theory utilizing a combined chronological and topical approach. Major topics 
include: sociological analysis of ancient and medieval views of population; mercan- 
tilism and population; economic, Utopian, philosophical and biological theories of 
population in the 18th century; Malthusian theory; and post-Malthusian theory, 
including biological, anthropological, mathematic, economic, political, historical, 
and especially social and social-psychological approaches. Suval 

SOC 671 Social Demography. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, SOC 509 or SOC 

631 or equivalents. 3(3-0) S. The basic purpose of this course is to develop on the 
part of the student an appreciation of the sociological variables capable of being 
used in demographic research and to provide an overview of the current substantive 
knowledge concerning social and demographic relationships. Attention will be given 
to the interrelationships between demographic systems, social action systems, and 
social aggregate systems. Graduate Staff 

SOC 690 Seminar. Credits Arranged F,S. Appraisal of current literature; presenta- 
tion of research papers by students; progress reports on departmental research; 
review of developing research methods and plans; reports from scientific meetings 
and conferences; other professional matters. Graduate Staff 

SOC 699 Research in Sociology. Prerequisite: Consent of chairman of graduate 
study committee. Credits Arranged F,S. Planning and execution of research, and 
preparation of manuscript under supervision of graduate committee. 

Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 249 

Soil Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor C. B. McCants, Head 

Professors: W. \^ Bartholomew, S. W. Buol, M. G. Cook, C. B. Davey, J. W. 
FiTTS, W. A. Jackson, G. L. Jones, E. J. Kamprath, R. J. Volk, J. B. Weber, 
S. B. Weed, W. G. Woltz, W. W. Woodhouse Jr.; Extension Professors: 
J. V. Baird, J. A. Phillips; Professor USDA: R. B. Daniels; Adjunct Profes- 
sors: L. J. Metz, C. G. Wells; Professor Emeritus: J. F. Lutz; Associate 
Professors: F. R. Cox, G. A. Cummings, J. W. Gilliam, R. E. McCollum, 
P. A. Sanchez, A. G. Wollum; Visiting Associate Professors: A. H. Hunter, 
J. L. Walker, D. L. Waugh; Assistant Professors: C. K. Martin, C. D. 
Raper Jr., E. D. Seneca, R. W. Skaggs, C. D. Sopher; Extension Assistant 
Professor: D. L. Terry 

The Department of Soil Science offers graduate programs leading to the Master 
of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. These are research-oriented degrees 
and require a dissertation based on individual research on some aspect of the 
science. 

Laboratories in the department are well equipped for research in all phases of 
the science. Service laboratories for soil and plant analyses are available, as well as 
special preparation rooms for soil and plant samples. Greenhouses, growth 
chambers, and a phytotron are easily accessible for controlled plant studies. Sites 
for field experiments are available on the 16 research farms and four experimental 
forests owned or operated in conjunction with the University. One of the largest 
soil testing laboratories in the United States is operated by the North Carolina 
Department of Agriculture in Raleigh. Special studies on various problems of soil 
testing can be made in conjunction with this laboratory. 

This department is highly regarded for its expertise in tropical soil science. A 
graduate student may orient his program so that emphasis is given to the properties 
and management of tropical soils. With this approach, a significant portion of the 
thesis research is conducted in tropical regions under senior faculty supervision. 

Strong supporting departments increase the graduate student's opportunities for 
high quality training. Opportunity for undergraduate teaching experience is avail- 
able. Graduates of the department find positions in industry, government and aca- 
demic institutions. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 



SSC 501 Tropical Soils: Characteristics and Management. Prerequisites: Six 
credits in soil science. 3(3-0) F. Characteristics of the tropical environment. Dis- 
tribution and classification of tropical soils. Soil plant relationships in the tropics. 



250 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Soil management systems emphasizing shifting cultivation, flooded rice production, 
subsistence farming and tropical pasture management. Sanchez 

SSC 511 Soil Physics. Prerequisites: PY 212, SSC 200. 4(3-3) F. Physical consti- 
tution and analyses; soil structure, soil water, soil air and soil temperature in 
relation to plant growth. Graduate Staff 

SSC 520 Soil and Plant Analysis. Prerequisites: PY 212; CH 315; at least three 
soils courses including SSC 341, or consent of instructor. 3(1-6) S. Theory and 
advanced principles of the utilization of chemical instruments to aid research on 
the heterogeneous systems of soils and plants. Gilliam 

SSC 522 Soil Chemistry. Prerequisites: SSC 200, one year of general inorganic 
chemistry. 3(3-0) S. A consideration of the chemical and colloidal properties of clay 
and soil systems, including ion exchange and retention, soil solution reactions, 
solvation of clays and electro kinetic properties of clay-water systems. Weed 

SSC 532 (MB 532) Soil Microbiology. Prerequisites: MB 401, CH 220. 3(3-0) S. 
Soil as a medium for microbial growth, the relation of microbes to important mineral 
transformations in soil, the importance of biological equilibrium, and significance of 
soil microbes to environmental quality. Wollum 

SSC 541 Soil Fertility. Prerequisite: SSC 341. 3(3-0) F. Soil conditions affecting 
plant growth and the chemistry of soil and fertilizer interrelationships. Factors 
affecting the availability of nutrients. Methods of measuring nutrient availability. 

Kamprath 

SSC 551 Soil Morphology, Genesis and Classification. Prerequisites: GY 120, 
SSC 200, SSC 341. 3(3-0) F. Morphology: Study of concepts of soil horizons and soil 
profiles and chemical, physical and mineralogical parameters useful in character- 
izing them. Genesis: Critical study of soil-forming factors and processes. Classifica- 
tion: Critical evaluation of historical development and present concepts of soil 
taxonomy with particular reference to great soil groups as well as discussion of 
logical basis of soil classification. Buol 

SSC 553 Soil Mineralogy. Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 341, and GY 330. 3(2-3) F. 
Composition, structure, classification, identification, origin, occurrence and signi- 
ficance of soil minerals with emphasis on primary weatherable silicates, layer 
silicate clays and sesquioxides. Cook 

SSC 560 Advanced Soil Management. Prerequisites: SSC 200, SSC 341. 3(3-0) 
Sum. Studies of soil characteristics in the coastal plain, Piedmont and mountain 
areas of North Carolina including several field trips. Discussion of management 
practices that should be associated with various soils for different types of enter- 
prises. (Offered summer 1975 and alternate years.) Cook, Kamprath, Phillips 

SSC 590 Special Problems. Prerequisite: SSC 200. Credits Arranged F,S. Special 
problems in various phases of soils. Emphasis will be placed on review of recent 
and current research. Graduate Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

SSC 614 (CS 614, HS 614) Herbicide Behavior in Plants and Soils. 3(3-0) F. (See 
crop science, page 105.) 

SSC 622 Soil Physical Chemistry. Prerequisites: SSC 511, SSC 553, CH 433. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 251 



3(3-0) S. An examination in depth of current ideas in the field. Topics will include 
double-layer theory, molecular adsorption, ion exchange, diffusion of ions in soil- 
water systems, and relations between clay-mineral structures and their chemical 
properties. Weed 

SSC 632 (MB 632) Ecology and Functions of Soil Micro-organisms. Prerequisites: 

MB 401, SSC 532 (MB 532) or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. A comprehensive examination of 
theories and concepts relative to ecology and functions of soil microorganisms. 
Topics include relationships of microbes to their environments, adaptive mechan- 
isms, microbial processes in soil organic matter formation and degradation, and 
function of organic matter in soil systems. Subject emphasis will be determined by 
class interests and by current literature. (Offered 1975 and alternate years.) 

Bartholomew, Davey 
SSC 651 Pedology. Prerequisites: SSC 522, SSC 511; SSC 551 or equivalent. 
3(3-0) F. A critical study of current theories and concepts in soil genesis, morphology 
and classification. (Offered 1975 and alternate years.) Graduate Staff 

SSC 671 (BAE 671) Theory of Drainage: Saturated Flow. 3(3-0) Alternate F. 
(See biological and agricultural engineering, page 78.) 

SSC 672 Soil Properties and Plant Development. Prerequisites: BCH 551, SSC 
522 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. An examination of the interrelationships of soil proper- 
ties and plant characteristics which regulate inorganic ion accumulation and dry 
matter production in higher plants. (Offered 1974 and alternate years.) Jackson 

SSC 674 (BAE 674) Theory of Drainage: Unsaturated Flow. 3(3-0) Alternate F. 
(See biological and agricultural engineering, page 78.) 

SSC 690 Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in soil science. 1(1-0) F,S. A 
maximum of two semester hours is allowed toward the master's degree, but any 
number toward the doctorate. Scientific articles, progress reports in research and 
special problems of interest to soil scientists reviewed and discussed. 

Graduate Staff 

SSC 693 Colloquium in Soil Science. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in soil sci- 
ence. Credits Arranged F,S. Seminar-type discussions and lectures on specialized 
and advanced topics in soil science. Graduate Staff 

SSC 699 Research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in soil science. Credits 
Arranged F,S. A maximum of six semester hours is allowed toward the master's 
degree, but any number toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff 



Statistics 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. D. Mason, Head 

Professors: B. B. Bhattacharyya, C. C. Cockerham, A. H. E. Grandage, R. J. 
Hader, D. W. Hayne, H. L. Lucas Jr., F. E. McVay, R. J. Monroe, L. A. 
Nelson, C. H. Proctor, C. P. Quesenberry, J. O. Rawungs, D. L. Ridge- 
way, J. A. Rigney, R. G. D. Steei.— Graduate Administrator, H. R. van der 
Vaart, T. D. Wallace, O. Wesler; Adjunct Professors: A. L. Finkner, J. T. 



252 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

Wakeley; Professor Emeritus: Gertrude M. Cox; Associate Professors: F. G. 
GlESBRECHT, H. J. GoLD, M. M. GoODMAN, W. L. Hafley, A. R. Manson, 
J. L. Wasik; Associate Professor USPS: B. F. Swindel; Adjunct Associate 
Professor: D. L. Bayless; Assistant Professors: A. R. Gallant, T. M. Gerig, 
A. G. Linnerud; Visiting Assistant Professor: P. M. Burrows; Research 
Associate: J. H. Goodnight 

The Department of Statistics offers the Master of Science, Master of Statistics 
(nonthesis). Master of Biomathematics (nonthesis) and Doctor of Philosophy 
degrees. It has a working arrangement with the Department of Biostatistics in the 
School of Public Health at Chapel Hill, whereby graduate students can minor in 
the Division of Health Affairs, and maintains a close liaison with the Department 
of (Mathematical) Statistics at Chapel Hill in order to supplement the offerings in 
statistical theory. The three departments are affiliated with the Institute of Statistics 
(see page 18). 

Members of the department conduct research in biomathematics, operations 
research, probability theory and the development and application of statistical 
theory. Many staff^ members consult with researchers in the biological, physical 
and social sciences and conduct their research on statistical problems encountered 
there. 

A graduate student may minor in one of many applied departments, or in mathe- 
matics or mathematical statistics. The department has cooperated with eight other 
departments at Raleigh and Chapel Hill to develop a strong minor program in 
operations research. Details regarding the operations research program are pre- 
sented on page 210. For the graduate student who wishes to minor in statistics, the 
department has a flexible curriculum. Many employers offer added inducements 
for research personnel with such a minor. 

A program of training in biomathematics at the doctoral and postdoctoral levels 
is available in the department. This program requires that students become well 
grounded in four areas — ^mathematics, statistics, physical science and some phase 
of biology. Fellowships and assistantships are available. Mathematical biology and 
related areas are now developing rapidly and there is much opportunity for prop- 
erly trained people. (For biomathematics courses, see page 79.) 

The department provides computer programming and other assistance to the 
Agricultural Experiment Station staff" in close cooperation with the campus Com- 
puting Center. It also provides a desk calculator computing service. It furnishes 
research and consulting services on a contract basis and this supplies live problems 
on which graduate students may acquire experience and maturity. 

The department is located in a new building and ample space for graduate stu- 
dents is provided. A well-equipped desk computing laboratory is located in the 
graduate student area. 

The computing fecilities described on page 22 are fully available to students and 
faculty in the Department of Statistics. The department has access to this facility 
through a medium-speed terminal conveniently near for batch processing, with 
several low-speed terminals of different types, including Teletype, IBM 2741 (with 
plotter), and Tektronics 4010-1 graphics with a hard copy unit. Interactive com- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 253 



puting is done largely through TSO (Time Sharing Option). In addition, the Uni- 
versity Data Acquisition, Systems and Simulation Center has various computers 
including the IBM System 7, PDF 11/40, the hybrid Ambilog 200, a hybrid 1130 
analog unit, and additional graphics devices. This Center is available for use by 
graduate students in statistics. 

The department has approximately 15 assistantships at stipends adjusted to the 
previous training and experience of the recipients. Students with a major in an 
applied field and at least one year of calculus, or with a major in statistics or mathe- 
matics are encouraged to apply for assistantships. Students with no advanced 
calculus or matrix algebra are advised that their program may be somewhat 
lengthened as a consequence. An adequately prepared graduate assistant can 
complete the master's degree in two years (in less time if he takes courses during 
the summer); with a master's degree in statistics, he can complete the requirements 
for the doctorate in two years. 

Most fields of research, development, production and distribution are seeking 
persons trained in statistical theory and methods. The demand is equally strong 
fi-om universities, agricultural and engineering experimental stations, national 
defense agencies, other federal agencies and a wide variety of industrial concerns. 
There is a need for experimental statisticians with the master's degree as well as 
for those with the doctorate. 

North Carolina State University is represented on the Committee on Statistics 
of the Southern Regional Education Board. This committee sponsors a continuing 
series of graduate summer sessions. Each of the sponsoring institutions will accept 
the credits earned by students in the summer session as residence credit. Infor- 
mation regarding these courses may be obtained fi-om the Department of Statistics 
or the Dean of the Graduate School. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ST 421, 422 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics. Prerequisite: MA 202 or 
MA 212 or MA 232. 3(3-0) F,S. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ST 501, 502 Basic Statistical Analysis. Prerequisite: ST 311 or equivalent or 
graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Basic concepts of statistics; random variables, dis- 
tributions, statistical measures, estimation, tests of significance, analysis of vari- 
ance, elementary design and sampling, factorial experiments, multiple regression, 
analysis of discrete data and other topics. Intended primarily for statistics majors 
and Ph.D. minors and not intended as a service course for other departments. 

Steel 

ST 507 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences I. 3(3-0) F. The purpose of this 
course is to provide a general introduction to descriptive and inferential statistics. 
Attention will be paid to investigating the role of statistics in behavioral science 
research as well as presenting the techniques and principles for summarizing data. 
A basic introduction to inferential statistics will be made with an emphasis on the 



254 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

concepts of hypothesis testing and decision making. The principles and methods 
will be illustrated by examples and problems from the behavioral science fields. 

Wasik, Monroe 

ST 508 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences II. Prerequisite: ST 507 or consent 
of instructor. 3(3-0) S. The purpose of this course is to provide further consideration 
of the use of advanced statistical techniques used in decision making in behavioral 
science research. Attention will be paid to hypothesis testing and analysis of vari- 
ance procedures used in the design of experiments. A part of the course will be 
devoted to topics relating to least squares and multiple regression analysis. 

Wasik 

ST 511 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences I. Prerequisite: ST 311 
or graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. Basic concepts of statistical models and use of 
samples; variation, statistical measures, distributions, tests of significance, analysis 
of variance and elementary experimental design, regression and correlation, chi- 
square. Staff 

ST 512 Experimental Statistics for Biological Sciences II. Prerequisite: ST 511 
or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Covariance, multiple regression, concepts of experimental 
design, factorial experiments, individual degrees of freedom, confounded factorial 
and split-plot designs. Staff 

ST 513 Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences I. Prerequisite: ST 311 or 
graduate standing. 3(3-0) F. Basic concepts in collection and analysis of data. 
Variability of sample data, distributions, confidence limits, chi-square, t-test, 
analysis of variance, regression, correlation, analytic and descriptive surveys, 
experimental designs. McVay 

ST 514 Experimental Statistics for Social Sciences II. Prerequisite: ST 513 or 
equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Extension of basic statistical concepts to social experiments 
and surveys; sampling from finite populations and estimating using unrestricted, 
stratified, systematic and multistage selections; analysis of variance continued; 
multiple regression; covariance; experimental designs. Proctor 

ST 515, 516 Experimental Statistics for Engineers. Prerequisite: ST 361 or grad- 
uate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. General statistical concepts and techniques useful to 
research workers in engineering, textiles, wood technology, etc. Probability, dis- 
tributions, measurement of precision, simple and multiple regression, tests of 
significance, analysis of variance, enumeration data, sensitivity data, life-testing 
experiments and experimental desig^is. Hader 

ST 517 Applied Least Squares. Prerequisite: ST 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Use 
of least squares estimation in developing numerical descriptions with linear models. 
Regression, analysis of variance and covariance are considered in a unified manner 
that does not require an extensive statistical background. Emphasis is placed on 
the application of these techniques to experimental situations and in broadening 
the range of problems to which they can be applied (particularly in terms of unequal 
numbers). A computer will be used for some assigned problems such as matrix 
inversion. Staff 

ST 521 Statistical Theory I. Corequisite: MA 425 or MA 511 and MA 405 or per- 
mission of instructor. 3(2-2) F. Discussion of the use of statistics as illustrated by 
an example, pointing out the need for a probabilistic framework. The probability 
tools for statistics: description of discrete and absolutely continuous distributions. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 255 



expected values, moments, moment generating functions, transformation of random 
variables, marginal and conditional distributions, independence, order statistics, 
multivariate distributions, concept of random sample, derivation of many sampling 
distributions. van der Vaart 

ST 522 Statistical Theory II. Prerequisite: ST 521; Corequisite: MA 426 or MA 
512. 3(2-2) S. General framework for statistical inference. Point estimators: biased 
and unbiased, minimum variance unbiased, least mean square error, maximum 
likelihood and least squares, asymptotic properties. Interval estimators and tests 
of hypotheses: confidence intervals, power functions, Neyman-Pearson lemma, 
likelihood ratio tests, unbiasedness, efficiency and sufficiency. van der Vaart 

ST 531 Design of Experiments. Prerequisite: ST 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Re- 
view of completely randomized, randomized complete block and Latin square de- 
signs, and the basic concepts in the techniques of experimental design. Designs and 
analysis methods in factorial experiments, confounded factorials, response surface 
methodology, change-over design, split-plot experiments and incomplete block de- 
signs. Examples will be used to illustrate application and analysis of these designs. 

Monroe 

ST 541 (MA 541) Theory of Probability I. 3(3-0) F. (See mathematics, page 188.) 

ST 542 (MA 542) Theory of Probability II. 3(3-0) S. (See mathematics, page 188.) 

ST 552 Basic Theory of Least Squares and Variance Components. Prerequisites: 
MA 405, ST 521; Corequisite: ST 522. 3(2-2) S. Theory of least squares; multiple 
regression; analysis of variance and covariance; experimental design models; fac- 
torial experiments; variance component models. Staff 

ST 561 (EC 561) Intermediate Econometrics. 3(3-0) S. (See economics, page 

in.) 

ST 571 (BMA 571, MA 571) Biomathematics I. 3(3-0) F. (See biomathematics, 

page 80.) 

ST 572 (BMA 572, MA 572) Biomathematics II. 3(3-0) S. (See biomathematics, 
page 80.) 

ST 581 Introduction to Nonparametric Statistics. Prerequisite: ST 522. 3(3-0) F. 
This course will treat both theoretical and methodological material relevant to in- 
ference problems arising when sampling is from a parent family that is not assumed 
to have a particular functional form. Most of the course will be devoted to inference 
problems for the absolutely continuous family of distributions. (Offered fall, 1974 
and alternate years.) Quesenberry 

ST 583 Introduction to Statistical Decision Theory. Prerequisite: ST 522. 3(3-0) 
F. The theory of statistical inference will be discussed from a unified decision theo- 
retic point of view and its relationship with the zero-sum two person game will be 
studied. Detailed attention will be paid to the development of techniques of statisti- 
cal analysis using Bayesian approach. The major emphasis in the course will be 
directed towards the solution of problems using decision theoretic concepts. (Offered 
fall 1975 and alternate years.) Bhattacharyya 

ST 591 Special Problems. 1-3 F,S. Development of techniques for specialized cases, 
particularly in connection with thesis and practical consulting problems. Staff 



256 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ST 606 (MA 606, OR 606) Mathematical Programming IL Prerequisite: IE 505 
"(MA 505, OR 505). 3(3-0) S. This course is intended for those who desire to study 
linear and non-linear programming from an advanced mathematical point of view. 
Special attention will be paid to the theoretical and computational aspects of cur- 
rent research problems in the field of mathematical programming, including linear 
programming and game theory, theory of graphs, discrete linear programming, 
linear programming under uncertainty and nonlinear programming. 

Bhattacharyya 

ST 613 Time Series Analysis L Prerequisites: ST 522 or ST 422 and ST 502 or 

equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Statistical analysis of realizations of covariance stationary 
stochastic processes with emphasis throughout on the spectrum. Applications of the 
theory and methods developed are discussed and illustrated with examples. Topics 
include autoregressive processes, moving average processes, spectral analysis; 
estimation of the parameters appearing in a time series generated by a linear re- 
sponse function and covariance stationary errors; estimation of the spectrum and its 
use in the analysis of the residuals from fitted models. Gallant 

ST 614 Time Series Analysis H. Prerequisite: ST 613. 3(3-0) F. Extensions of the 
theory and methods developed in ST 613 to multiple time series and nonlinear re- 
sponse functions. Topics include cross-spectral density, co-spectral density, quadra- 
ture-spectral density, coherence and phase; estimation of the parameters appearing 
in a time series generated by a nonlinear response function and covariance station- 
ary errors; estimation of the cross-spectral density. Gallant 

ST 617, 618 (MA 617, 618) Measure Theory and Advanced Probability. Prerequi- 
sites: MA 426; ST 521 or MA 541 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. Modern measure and in- 
tegration theory in abstract spaces, probability measures, random variables and ex- 
pectations, conditional probability and conditional expectations, distribution func- 
tions, characteristic functions, modes of convergence, weak and strong laws of large 
numbers, central limit theorems and other limit laws, introduction to stochastic 
processes. Wesler, Bhattacharyya 

ST 619 (MA 619) Topics in Advanced Probability. Prerequisites: ST 617, 618 
(MA 617, 618). 3(3-0) Sum. Characteristic functions, infinitely divisible and stable 
laws, factorizations of probability distributions, laws of iterated logarithm, random 
walks, fluctuation theory, martingales, ergodic theory, Markov processes, the Pois- 
son process, further topics in stochastic processes, applications. Wesler 

ST 621 Statistics in Animal Science. Prerequisite: ST 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 
Sources and magnitudes of errors in experiments with animals, experimental de- 
signs and methods of analysis adapted to specific types of animal research; relative 
efficiency of alternate designs, amount of data required for specified accuracy, stu- 
dent reports on selected topics. (Ofifered fall 1975 and alternate years.) 

Lucas, Linnerud 

ST 622 (ANS 622) Principles of Biological Assays. 3(3-0) S. (See animal science, 
page 70.) 

ST 623 Statistics in Plant Science. Prerequisite: ST 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 
Principles and techniques of planning, establishing and executing field and gfreen- 
house experiments. Size, shape and orientation of plots; border effects; selection of 
experimental material; estimation of size of experiments for specified accuracy; 
scoring and subjective tests; subsampling plots and yields for laboratory analysis. 

Nelson 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 257 



ST 626 (ON 626) Statistical Concepts in Genetics. Prerequisite: GN 506; Core- 
quisite: ST 502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. Factors bearing on rates of change in popu- 
lation means and variances, with special reference to cultivated plants and domestic 
animals; selection, inbreeding, magnitude and nature of genotypic and nongeno- 
typic variability; experimental and statistical approaches in the analysis of quanti- 
tative inheritance. (Offered spring 1974 and alternate years.) Cockerham 

ST 631 Theory of Sampling Applied to Survey Design. Prerequisites: ST 422; ST 
502 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. Principles for interpretation and design of sample sur- 
veys. Biases, variances and costs of estimators. Comparisons among simple random 
sample, ratio estimation, stratification, varying probabilities of selection, multi- 
stage, systematic and cluster sampling, double sampling. Response errors. 

Proctor 

ST 637 Advanced Statistical Inference. Prerequisites: ST 522, ST 617. 3(3-0) S. 
This course will treat the classical areas of statistical inference, estimation and hy- 
pothesis testing, at the measure-theoretic level. Emphasis will be upon treatment of 
these areas in depth. Quesenberry 

ST 651 (EC 651) Econometrics. 3(3-0) F. (See economics, page 113.) 

ST 652 (EC 652) Topics in Econometrics. 3(3-0) S. (See economics, page 113.) 

ST 671 Advanced Analysis of Variance and Variance Components. Prerequisite: 
ST 502 or equivalent, ST 552. 3(3-0) S. Expected mean squares, estimation of means, 
confidence limits, exact and approximate tests of hypotheses for balanced and unbal- 
anced nested, crossed, and mixed classifications with random, finite, and fixed ef- 
fects. Estimation of variance components and designs for estimating variance com- 
ponents. Heterogeneity, non-normality, correlated errors, and transformations. 

Giesbrecht 

ST 674 Advanced Topics in Construction and Analysis of Experimental Designs. 

Prerequisites: ST 502 or equivalent, ST 552. 3(3-0) S. Interblock analysis of incom- 
plete block designs, partially balanced designs, confounding, data collected at sev- 
eral places and times, multiple factor designs, change-over trials, analysis of 
groups of means. Manson 

ST 682 Statistical Analysis for Linear Models. Prerequisites: ST 502 or equiva- 
lent, ST 552. 3(3-0) F. Review of basic least squares, partitioning sums of squares, 
weighted least squares; regression coefficients as random variables; models with 
redundancies, use of generalized inverses; models with restrictions; applications to 
disproportionate data, incomplete blocks designs and covariance analysis; arithme- 
tic items; application to nonlinear models. Gerig 

ST 691 Advanced Special ProWems. Prerequisites: ST 502 or equivalent, ST 552. 
1-3 F,S. Any new advance in the field of statistics which can be presented in lecture 
series as unique opportunities arise. Graduate Staff, Visiting Professors 

ST 694 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. A maximum of two semester hours is allowed toward 
the master's degree, but any number toward the doctorate. Graduate Staff 

ST 699 Research. Credits Arranged F,S. A maximum of nine semester hours is 
allowed toward the Master of Science degree; no limitation on semester hours in 
doctorate programs. Graduate Staff 



258 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL 
STATISTICS COURSES 

U.N.C. ST 133 Introduction to Time Series Analysis. Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 102 
or U.N.C. ST 127. 3(3-0) F,S. Topics chosen from: Time series data analysis. Fitting 
parametric models, such as regression-autoregression models to time series. Spec- 
trum analysis. Filtering. Wegman 

UJiJ.C. ST 150 Analysis of Variance with Application to Experimental Designs. 

Corequisite: U.N.C. ST 135. 3(3-0) S. Linear estimation. Gauss-Markoflf theorem. 
Sums of squares. Analysis of variance and generalized t and F tests. Intrablock 
analysis of incomplete block designs. Balanced, lattice and Latin square designs. 

Chakravarti, Johnson 

UJV.C. ST 170 Order Statistics. Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 127. 3(3-0) S. Distribu- 
tion and moments of order statistics. Estimation of location and scale parameters, 
censoring. Robust estimation. Short-cut procedures. Treatment of outliers. Extreme- 
value theory. (Offered 1973-1974 and alternate years.) Graduate Staff 

UJV.C. ST 210 Design and Analysis of Experiments. Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 102 
and U.N.C. ST 150. 3(3-0) F, The principles of the design and analysis of experi- 
ments. Randomization, replication, local control. Randomized blocks. Latin and 
Graeco-Latin squares, factorial experiments. Confounding, fractional factorials, 
split plots, recent developments. Chakravarti, Johnson 

UJV.C. ST 220 Theory of Estimation and Hypothesis Testing. Prerequisites: 
U.N.C. ST 132 and U.N.C. ST 135. 4(4-0) F. Bayes procedures for estimation and 
testing. Minimax procedures. Unbiased estimators. Unbiased tests and similar tests. 
Invariant procedures. Sufficient statistics. Confidence sets. Large sample theory. 

Hoeffding 

UJ>J.C. ST 221 Sequential Analysis. Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132 and U.N.C. ST 
135. 3(3-0) F. Hypothesis testing and estimation when the sample size depends on 
the observations. Sequential probability ratio tests. Sequential design of experi- 
ments. Optimal stopping. Stochastic approximation. Simons 

UJV.C. ST 222 Nonparametric Inference. Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 132, U.N.C. 
ST 135 and U.N.C. ST 112. 3(3-0) S. Estimation and testing when the functional 
form of the population distribution is unknown. Rank, sign, and permutation tests. 
Optimum n on -parametric tests and estimators. Hoeffding 

U.N.C. ST 232 General Theory of Statistical Decision. Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 
135 and U.N.C. ST 112. 3(3-0) S. Selected topics in the general theory of statistical 
decisions, based on the work of Abraham Wald. (Offered 1973-1974 and alternate 
years.) Hoeffding 

UJ^.C. ST 235 Stochastic Processes. Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 112 and U.N.C. ST 
132. 3(3-0) S. Advanced theoretic course including topics selected from: Foundations 
of stochastic processes. Renewal processes. Stationary processes, Markov processes. 
Martingales, Point processes. (Offered 1973-1974 and alternate years.) 

Leadbetter, Smith 

UJM.C. ST 237 Time Series Analysis. Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 112 and U.N.C. 
ST 132. 3(3-0) S. Analysis of time series data by means of particular models such as 
autogressive and moving average schemes. Spectral theory for stationary processes 
and associated methods for inference. Stationarity testing. (Offered 1974-1975 and 
alternate years.) Leadbetter, Weg:man 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 259 



U.N.C. ST 251 Combinatorial Problems of the Design of Experiments. Prerequi- 
site: U.N.C. ST 150. 3(3-0) F. Finite fields and finite geometries. Construction of 
orthogonal Latin squares and balanced incomplete block designs. Confounding, con- 
struction and analysis of symmetrical and functional factorial designs. 

Chakravarti, Smith 

UJ^.C. ST 252 Information Theory. Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 134. 3(3-0) S. Trans- 
mission of information, entropy, message ensembles, discrete sources, transmission 
channels, channel encoding and decoding for discrete channels. Chakravarti 

U.N.C. ST 253 Error Correcting Codes. Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 251 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 3(3-0) S. Linear codes and their error-correcting capabilities. 
Hamming codes. Reed-Muller codes. Cyclic codes. Bose-Chaudhuri codes. Burst 
error correction. Majority logic decoding. Chakravarti, Smith 

UJV.C. ST 254 Special Topics in Design of Experiments L Prerequisite: U.N.C. 
ST 150. 3(3-0) F. Response surface designs. Conditions for rotatability. Construction 
and analysis of rotatable designs of the second and third order. Interblock analysis. 
General analysis of covariance. Missing plot techniques. Chakravarti 

U.N.C. ST 255 Special Topics in the Design of Experiments IL Prerequisite: 
U.N.C. ST 251. 3(3-0) S. Combinatorial properties and construction of balanced, 
group divisible and partially balanced designs. Impossibility proofs. Orthogonal 
Latin squares of non-prime power orders. Orthogonal arrays. Asymmetrical frac- 
tionally replicated designs. Chakravarti 

UJV.C. ST 260 Multivariate Analysis. Prerequisites: U.N.C. ST 135 and matrices. 
3(3-0) F. Characterization and properties of a multivariate normal distribution. 
Related distributions. Tests and confidence intervals. Multivariate analysis of var- 
iance, covariance and regression. Association between subsets of a multivariate 
normal set. Factor analysis. Johnson 

UJiJ.C. ST 261 Advanced Parametric Multivariate Analysis. Prerequisite: U.N.C. 
ST 260. 3(3-0) S. Distribution problems involved in the normal theory analysis of 
general multivariate linear models including the growth curves. An introduction to 
zonal polynomials and orthogonal groups. Union-intersection principle and its role 
in multivariate analysis. (Offered 1974-1975 and alternate years.) Graduate Staff 

UJ>J.C. ST 262 Introductory Nonparametric Multivariate Analysis. Prerequisite: 
U.N.C. ST 222 and U.N.C. ST 260. 3(3-0) F. The problem of symmetry in the multi- 
variate case. Nonparametric tests for ANOVA and MANOVA in one-way layouts. 
Robust estimation of location and of contrasts in one-way MANOVA. Large sample 
properties of the tests and estimates. Graduate Staff 

UJ*J.C. ST 263 Advanced Nonparametric Multivariate Analysis. Prerequisite: 
U.N.C. ST 262. 3(3-0) S. Robust nonparametric inference in various multifactor 
multiresponse experiments. The problem of multidimensional independence. Non- 
parametric inference in general linear models. (Offered 1973-1974 and alternate 
years.) Graduate Staff 

U.N.C. ST 300, 301 Seminar in Statistical Literature. Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 
135. 1(1-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

UJV.C. ST 310, 311 Seminar in Theoretical Statistics. Prerequisite: U.N.C. ST 
135. 3(3-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 

UJM.C. ST 321, 322 Special Problems. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 
3(3-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 



260 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



UJJ.C. ST 331, 332 Advanced Research. Prerequisite: Permission of the instruc- 
tor. 3(3-0) F,S. Graduate Staff 



TEXTILES 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. W. Chaney, Dean 

Professors: J. F. Bogdan— Head cf the Department of Textile Technology, K. S. 
Campbell, D. M. Cates, R. D. Gilbert — Chairman of the Graduate Studies 
Committee for the Fiber and Polymer Science Program, G. Goldfinger, D. 
S. Hamby — Director, Textiles Extension and Continuing Education, S. P. 
Hersh— Graduate Administrator in Textile Technology, P. R. Lord, J. A. 
Porter Jr., H. A. Rutherford — Head of the Department of Textile Chemis- 
try, M. R. Shaw — Assistant Dean for Textile Research; Professor Emeritus: R. 
W. Work; Adjunct Professors: H. R. Mark, A. M. Sookne; Associate Profes- 
sors: W. D. Cooper, J. A. Cuculo, A. H. M. El-Shiekh, P. D. Emerson — 
Head, Textile Machine Design and Development, T. W. George, T. H. Guion, 
B. S. Gupta, W. K. Lynch, M. H. M. Mohamed, R. McGregor — Graduate 
Administrator in Textile Chemistry, T. G. Rochow, W. C. Stuckey Jr., M. 
H. Theil, W. K. Walsh; Research Associate: C. E. Bryan; Assistant Profes- 
sors: P. Brown, R. E. Fornes, P. L. Grady, C. D. Livengood, D. M. Powell, 
M. L. Robinson, P. A. Tucker Jr.; Adjunct Assistant Professors: D. H. 
Black, L. A. Graham 

The School of Textiles offers programs leading to the Master of Science degree 
in textile chemistry and in textile technology, the professional degree of Master of 
Textile Technology, and the Doctor of Philosophy in fiber and polymer science. 
(For a description of the Fiber and Polymer Science program, see page 149.) 

Students otherwise meeting the requirements of the Graduate School and with 
Bachelor of Science degrees with majors in textiles, the physical sciences or engi- 
neering will normally qualify for the graduate degree prograins. 

The minimum requirement for a Master of Textile Technology degree is the 
satisfactory completion of 33 semester hours of advanced courses. There is no thesis 
or foreign language requirement. This program offers the student advanced profes- 
sional training with emphasis on management. Students pursuing this degree are 
encouraged to minor in economics or industrial engineering. 

The programs of study for the Master of Science degree include a minimum of 30 
semester hours of advanced courses, including six semester hours devoted to a the- 
sis based on research conducted by the student. There is no foreign language re- 
quirement. The plan of course work and the research activities for the Master of 
Science degree are designed to prepare the student for a career in research, devel- 
opment or other technical phases of the textile and allied industries. Students may 
minor in any one of a number of associated fields. 

Programs of study may be arranged to develop a broad background in three gen- 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 261 



eral areas: advanced textile technology; production and marketing management of 
textiles; and textile chemistry. Those students interested in the first of these may 
emphasize areas such as fiber and yarn technology, fabric technology, knitting 
technology, and testing or quality control. Programs leading to the Master of Sci- 
ence degree in textile chemistry emphasize fiber and polymer chemistry. In the 
area of marketing and production management, the program emphasizes the appli- 
cations of quantitative decision methods including operations research and compu- 
ter techniques to the textile industry. Programs in this area normally terminate 
within the School of Textiles with either the Master of Textile Technology or Mas- 
ter of Science degree in textile technology, but may be structured to provide suit- 
able backgrounds for students wishing to do fiorther graduate work in the areas of 
economics, industrial management, industrial engineering or business administra- 
tion. 



Textiles (General Courses) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

T 492 Problems in Science and Technology. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 1(0-2) 
S. 

T 493 Industrial Internship in Textiles. Prerequisite: Junior or senior in good 
standing. 3-6 Sum. 

T 500 Advanced Microscopy. Prerequisite: T 300 or consent of instructor. 3(1-4) 
F,S. The art and science of light and electron microscopy and introduction to micro- 
radiography; theoretical and practical aspects of visibility resolution and contrast. 
Laboratory practice in assembly, testing and using various microscopes and acces- 
sories in describing, identifying and micrographing crystalline, oriented or amor- 
phous materials, especially those which are of interest to the student. Laboratory 
work may include special projects for independent investigations. Rochow 

T 501 Resinography. Prerequisite: T 300 or T 500 and TX 460 or TX 560 or TC 

461. 3(1-4) F,S. Lectures, laboratory and discussion regarding structure and mor- 
phology of resins, fibers, elastomers and composites. Such materials will be studied 
by reflected light or electrons and by transmitted light or electrons. Other methods 
of diffraction and spectrometry will be discussed. Crystallographic and optical prop- 
erties will be emphasized. Rochow 

T 506 Color Science. Prerequisite: Senior in textile chemistry or graduate stu- 
dent. 3(2-2) F. A thorough discussion of color theory with particular emphasis on 
color measurement. Color and color difference calculations. From the data of the 
basic color matching experiments the description of a colorspace and its transfor- 
mation into the CIE color space will be followed in detail. The basis of color differ- 
ence calculations will be discussed. Color matches and color differences will be cal- 
culated based on experimental data obtained in the course. Goldfinger 

Textile Chemistry 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and other information see textiles, page 260 .) 



262 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

TC 401 Textile Industry and the Environment, Prerequisite: Consent of instruc- 
tor. 3(3-0) S. 

TC 403, 404 Textile Chemical Technology. Prerequisites: (403) CH 223, TC 303. 

3(3-0) F.S. 

TC 405, 406 Textile Chemical Technology Laboratory. Prerequisites: TC 403, TC 
404. 2(0-6) F,S. 

TC 411 Textile Chemical Analysis I. Prerequisite: TC 301. 3(2-2) S. 

TC 412 Textile Chemical Analysis II. Prerequisite: CH 315. 3(2-3) S. 

TC 461 (CH 461) Chemistry of Fibers. Prerequisite: CH 223. 3(3-0) F. 

TC 490 Special Topics in Textile Chemistry. 1-6 F,S. 

TC 491 Seminar in Textile Chemistry. Prerequisite: TC 403. 1(0-2) S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

TC 504 Fiber Formation-Theory and Practice. Prerequisites: MA 301, PY 208 or 
consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F. A practical and theoretical analysis of the chemical 
and physical principles underlying the conventional methods of converting bulk 
polymer to useful fiber; rheology; melt, dry and wet polymer extrusion; fiber draw- 
ing; heat setting; application of general theory to unit processes. Cuculo 

TC 505 Theory of Dyeing. Prerequisite: CH 433 or consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. 
Mechanisms of dyeing. Application of thermodynamics to dyeing systems. Kinetics 
of diffusion in dyeing processes. McGregor 

TC 561 Organic Chemistry of High Polymers. Prerequisites: TC 461 (CH 461), 
CH 331 or CH 431. 3(3-0) S. Principles of step- and chain-growdh polymerizations; 
copolymerization theory; homogeneous free radical polymerization; emulsion poly- 
merization; Ziegler-Natta polymerization; ionic polymerization. Gilbert, Theil 

TC 562 (CH 562) Physical Chemistry of High Polymers — Bulk Properties. Prere- 
quisites: CH 220 or CH 223; CH 331 or CH 431. 3(3-0) F. Molecular weight descrip- 
tion; states of aggregation and their interconversion; rubbery, glassy and crystal- 
line states; rubber elasticity; molecular friction; diffusion and viscosity; dynamics 
of network response; retardation- and relaxation-time spectra; thermodynamics of 
nucleation; kinetics of crystallization. Gates, Walsh 

TC 569 (CHE 569) Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. 3(3-0) F. (See 
chemical engineering, page 87.) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

TC 662 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers — Solution Properties. Prerequi- 
sites: CH 433, TC 562 (CH 562). 3(3-0) S. Sorption and diffusion; thermodynamics 
of polymer solutions; phase equilibria; configurational and frictional properties; 
methods of determining molecular weight. Gates, Walsh 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 263 



TC 669 (CHE 669) Diffusion in Polymers. 2(2-0) S. (See chemical engineering, 

page 88.) 

TC 671 (CHE 671) Special Topics in Polymer Science. 1-3 F. (See chemical engi- 
neering, page 88.) 

TC 691 (TX 691) Special Topics in Fiber Science. 1-3 S. (See textile technology, 
page 266.) 

TC 698 Seminar for Textile Chemistry. 1 F,S. Discussion of scientific articles and 
presentations; review and discussion of student papers and research problems. 

Graduate Staff 

TC 699 Textile Research for Textile Chemistry. Credits Arranged. Individual re- 
search in the field of textile chemistry. Graduate Staff 

Textile Technology 

(For a listing of graduate faculty and other information, see textiles, page 260.) 

FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

TX 405 Non-Conventional Fabric Structures. Prerequisites: Senior standing and 
consent of instructor. 3(3-0) F,S. 

TX 420 Modem Developments in Yarn Manufacturing Systems. Prerequisite: 
Senior standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 

TX 425 Textured Yarn Production and Properties. Prerequisites: TX 211, TX 
220. 3(2-2) F,S,Sum. 

TX 426 Long Staple and Tow Systems. Prerequisites: TX 211, TX 220. 3(2-2) F, 
S.Sum. 

TX 431 Special Topics in Testing. Prerequisites: TX 330, senior or graduate 
standing. 3(2-2) F. 

TX 441 Advanced Weft Knitting. Prerequisite: TX 340. 3(2-2) F,S,Sum. 

TX 447 Advanced Design of Knitting Structures. Prerequisite: TX 340. 2(0-4) F,S. 

TX 449 Warp Knitting Systems. Prerequisite: TX 340. 3(2-2) F,S. 

TX 450 Advanced Design and Weaving. Prerequisite: TX 350. 3(2-2) F,S. 

TX 451 Complex Woven Structures. Prerequisite: TX 450. 3(2-2) S. 

TX 460 Physical Properties of Textile Fibers. Prerequisites: MA 212, PY 212. 3 
(3-0) F,S. 

TX 470 Fabric Styling and Design. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and 
consent of instructor. 2(2-0) F,S. 



264 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



TX 480 Textile Cost Control. Prerequisites: EC 202, TX 320, TX 350. 3(3-0) F,S, 
Sum. 

TX 482 (EC 482) Sales Management for Textiles. Prerequisite: TX 380. 3(3-0) 
F,S. 

TX 484 Management Decision Making for the Textile Firm. Prerequisite: TX 482 
(EC 482). 3(3-0) F,S. 

TX 490 Development Project in Textile Technology. Prerequisites: Senior stand- 
ing, consent of instructor. 2-3 F,S,Sum. 

TX 491 Special Topics in Textiles. Prerequisite: Senior standing. 1-3 F,S. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

TX 530 Textile Quality Control. Prerequisite: TX 330 or consent of instructor. 3 
(3-0) S. Quality control systems for textile operations with emphasis on sampling 
plans for attributes and variables and on interpretation of data as related to identi- 
fying sources of product variability. Stuckey 

TX 550 Fabric Analytics. Prerequisite: TX 350 or graduate standing. 3(3-0) F,S. 
Development of a numerical system for characterizing designs. Permutations and 
combinations of weave elements. Correlation of fiber and yarn properties with those 
of the fabric. Engineering design of fabrics. Relationship between fabrics having 
geometrical similarity and the prediction of their physical properties. Bogdan 

TX 560 Structural and Physical Properties of Fibers. Prerequisite: MA 301. 3 
(3-0) F. Advanced study of the structure and physical properties (moisture, thermal, 
optical, frictional and electrical) of textile fibers. Theoretical relations and advanced 
techniques are presented and discussed. Gupta 

TX 561 Mechanical and Rheological Properties of Fibrous Material. Prerequisite: 
MA 301. 3(2-2) S. In-depth study of the stress-strain, bending, torsional, dynamic 
and rheological behavior of natural and man-made fibers. Theoretical relations and 
advanced techniques are presented and discussed. Gupta 

TX 585 (EC 585) Market Research in Textiles. Prerequisites: MA 405, ST 421. 3 
(3-0) S. A study and analysis of the quantitative methods employed in market re- 
search in the textile industry. The function of market research and its proper orien- 
tation to management and decision-making. Cooper 

TX 586 Textile Labor Management. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. A study of labor management problems in the textile industry, with partic- 
ular emphasis directed toward the roll of production supervision in a non-union 
textile plant. A study of NLRB decision and court opinions involving textile corpor- 
ations. Powell 

TX 590 Special Projects in Textiles. Prerequisites: Senior standing or graduate 
standing, consent of instructor. 2-3 F,S,Sum. Special studies in either the major or 
minor field of the advanced undergraduate or graduate student. These studies will 
include current problems of the industry, independent investigations, seminars and 
technical presentation, both oral and written. Graduate Staff 

TX 591 Special Topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1-4 F,S. An intensive 
treatment of selected topics involving textile technology. Graduate Staff 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 265 



TX 598 Textile Technology Seminar. Prerequisites: Senior standing, consent of 
instructor. 2(2-0) S. Lecture and discussion of current topics relating to the textile 
industry. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

TX 601 Staple Fiber Structures L Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(2-2) S. Stu- 
dies of advanced techniques in textile production; the technological aspects of fiber 
properties in relation to processing; studies of research findings and application of 
these to processing equipment. Lord 

TX 602 Staple Fiber Structures H. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(2-2) F,S, 
Sum. Problems dealing with advanced textile production and the technological im- 
plications of fiber processing will be assigned for study and investigation. Attention 
will be given to the preparation of reports for oral and written presentation. 

Graduate Staff 

TX 621 Textile Testing III. Prerequisite: TX 530 or equivalent. 2(2-0) S. Design 
of textile laboratories, including conditioning equipment and instruments required 
for specific needs; performance of tests and analysis of data on industrial problems; 
specialized physical tests; interlaboratory tests and analysis; study of A.S.T.M. 
specifications and work on task groups for A.S.T.M. Gupta 

TX 631 Synthetic Fibers. Prerequisite: TX 425 or TX 426 or equivalent. 2(1-2) F, 
S,Sum. Lectures and projects on advanced problems associated with the properties 
and processing of man-made continuous filament and staple fiber yams. Hersh 

TX 641, 642 Advanced Knitting Systems and Mechanisms. Prerequisite: TX 441 
or equivalent. 3(3-0) F,S. A critical study of inventions which have contributed to 
the development of the modern knitting industry; knitting needles and their adap- 
tion for specific uses; means for mounting them for individual and en masse opera- 
tion; construction and functioning of cooperating elements including sliders, jacks, 
sinkers, dividers, pressing elements, narrowing and tensioning and draw-off mo- 
tions, regulating mechanisms, timing and control chains and cams. Use will be made 
of patent literature which covers important developments in the hosiery industry. 

Brown 

TX 643, 644 Knitting Technology. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, eight hours 
in knitting technology. 3(1-4) F,S. Problems of specific interest to the knitting in- 
dustry will be assigned for study and investigation. The use of experimental meth- 
ods will be emphasized. Attention will be given to the preparation of reports for pub- 
lication. Graduate Staff 

TX 651, 652 Fabric Development and Construction. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 3(1-4) F,S. Application of advanced technology to the development and con- 
struction of woven fabrics. 

TX 663 (MAE 663) Mechanics of Twisted Structures. Prerequisites: EM 301, TX 
560. 3(3-0) F. Study of the basic mechanics of fibrous assemblies. Geometry and me- 
chanics of twisted structures (yarns, cords, braids. . .) and the translation of fiber 
properties into structural behavior. El-Shiekh 

TX 664 (MAE 664) Mechanics of Fabric Structures. Prerequisite: TX 663 (MAE 
663). 3(3-0) S. Analysis of the geometry and behavior of woven, knitted and nonwo- 
ven fabrics under various stress conditions and end use applications. El-Shiekh 



266 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



TX 680 Special Projects in Textile Management. Prerequisite: TX 585 (EC 585). 
1-3 F.S.Sum. Special studies in textile management covering current problems of 
the industry, independent investigations, seminars and technical presentations, both 
oral and written. Cooper 

TX 686 Advanced Textile Labor Management Seminar. Prerequisite: TX 586. 3 
(3-0) F,S. A study of advanced labor management problems in the textile industry, 
with particular emphasis directed toward the application of the Occupational Safety 
and Health Act. Powell 

TX 691 (TC 691) Special Topics in Fiber Science. Prerequisite: Consent of in- 
structor. 1-3 S. The study of selected topics of particular interest in various ad- 
vanced phases of fiber science. Graduate Staff 

TX 698 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. Discussion of scientific articles of interest to the tex- 
tile industry; review and discussion of student papers and research problems. 

Graduate Staff 

TX 699 Textile Research. Credits Arranged. Problems of specific interest to the 
textile industry will be assigned for study and investigation. The use of experimen- 
tal methods will be emphasized. Attention will be given to the preparation of reports 
for publication. The master's thesis may be based upon the data obtained. 

Graduate Staff 



Toxicology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: W. C. Dauterman, W. E. Donaldson, D. S. Grosch, F. E. Guthrie, 
D. W. Hayne, E. Hodgson, A. R. Main, R. J. Monroe, D. E. Moreland, J. J. 
Perry, T. |. Sheets; Adjunct Professor: J. R. Fouts 

The combined impact of population increase and urbanization has magnified the 
problem of environmental contamination in recent years. As technology attempts to 
keep pace with the increased demands of our complex civilization, additional toxi- 
cants will be introduced which may affect man and other animals. The need for 
increased scrutiny of toxic agents and an understanding of their mode of toxic ac- 
tion (especially in trace amounts) is evidenced by recent findings summarized in 
many reports by government and professional organizations. 

A graduate minor in toxicology at the master's or doctor's level which provides 
the coordination necessary to offer the student an excellent background in toxicol- 
ogy is available. This is an interdepartmental program which draws faculty from 
the Departments of Biochemistry, Botany, Crop Science, Entomology, Genetics, 
Microbiology, Poultry Science, Statistics and Zoology. Students majoring in these 
and related subject matter departments may elect the toxicology minor. 

Requirements for a minor at the M.S. level will be either TOX 510 or TOX 515 
and for the Ph.D. degree both TOX 510 and TOX 515. Additional courses from the 
supplementary list will be added at the discretion of the faculty member represent- 
ing the minor (the same faculty member cannot represent both the major and 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 267 



minor). The supplementary list includes: BCH 452, CH 428, GN 532 (ZO 532), 
BCH 551, BCH 557, BCH 652, ST 511, ZO 614 and ENT 622. 

The Toxicology Minor Program is administered by a Toxicology Advisory Com- 
mittee whose chairmanship is on a rotational basis. Additional information about 
the program may be obtained by writing to one of the faculty mentioned above. 

TOX 510 Introduction to Biochemical Toxicology. Prerequisites: Biochemistry, 
senior standing. 2(2-0) F. Emphasis is placed on the molecular events that occur 
during the toxic action of xenobiotics, including penetration phenomena, and the 
enzymatic mechanisms involved in detoxication. 

TOX 515 Environmental Toxicology. Prerequisite: Two years of biology. 2(2-0) S. 
The nature, distribution and significance of microchemical contamination will be 
discussed. 

TOX 590 Special Problems in Toxicology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1-3. 

TOX 690 Toxicology Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1(1-0) S. 



Urban Design 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professors: R. P. Burns Jr., C. E. McKinney, R. R. Wilkinson; Associate Profes- 
sors: P. Batchelor, R. H. Clark, H. Sanoff 

The Urban Design program has been conceived as an area of specialization and 
concentration in support of growing professional activity in the planning and design 
of contemporary urban environments. Urban design is an interdisciplinary area in- 
volving two major professional and academic disciplines — architecture and city 
planning — and in recent years the technologically advanced nations in the world 
have begun to utilize urban design as a means of resolving problems related to the 
physical growth and development of cities. Acting on a manifest need for special- 
ized skills in urban design, the Department of Architecture of the School of Design 
at North Carolina State University has combined its resources with those of the De- 
partment of City and Regional Planning at the University of North Carolina in 
Chapel Hill. Thus, the urban design program is a joint graduate program utilizing a 
diversified body of interdisciplinary expertise. 

The urban design program admits qualified candidates from both design and 
non-design backgrounds. Depending on the extent of preparation, a student may 
spend fi-om four to six academic semesters in course work. In addition, a period of 
internship is required in agencies or professional consultants' offices where urban 
design and planning problems are being handled. This period of internship can be 
waived upon evidence of equivalent prior experience, or it can be undertaken dur- 
ing the student's program of study as summer work experience. 

Students in urban design have access to electives in many of the professional and 



268 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



non-professional courses offered in architecture, landscape architecture and pro- 
duct design. Moreover, the growing concept of interdisciplinary education has 
broadened the scope of an urban design education to the point where there are 
manv minor fields of study. Therefore, students enrolled in the program are able to 
choose among a wide range of minor areas of specialization, some of which are: 
urban physical systems, urban redevelopment, urban technology, housing systems, 
production technology, natural systems and environmental policy planning. 

The Urban Design Program does identify with the societal needs of the commun- 
ity, state, and region and sees the design studio as offering an appropriate oppor- 
tunity for addressing society's most critical environmental conditions. In recent 
semesters studio options have included urban renewal and new towns design, pro- 
gramming, planning, and design of urban physical systems, and other related prob- 
lems. 

The program will require all students to undertake the normal two-year master's 
program of a minimum of 48 credit hours of course work of which 50 percent will 
be in the major field, 25 percent in the minor field, and the remainder in indepen- 
dent research. Course work in the minor field will be selected to reinforce the stu- 
dent's individual abilities and long-range career goals. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

UD 501 Introductory Problems in Urban Design. Prerequisite: Graduate stand- 
ing. 3(0-6) F. Introduction to descriptive analysis of physical and socio-economic 
phenomena of urban environments, and application of research methods in the de- 
finition and resolution of urban design problems. 

UD 502 Urban Design Workshop I. Prerequisite: UD 501. 3(0-6) S. A complete 
synthesis of design factors influencing an environmental system or an urban com- 
plex. 

UD 510 Theory of Urban Form. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or advanced 
undergraduate standing. 3(3-0) S. Survey of interdisciplinary theory of urban 
growth and evolution with about one-half of the class periods devoted to historical 
development of theory, and the other half devoted to contemporary quantitative mo- 
dels of urban form. 

UD 520 Theory and Principles of Urban Design. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
3(3-0) S. An examination of the nature of the design process in urban environments 
with special emphasis on contemporary theory and practice. 

UD 590 Special Topics in Urban Design I. Prerequisite: Fourth year standing. 1-6 
F,S. This course provides a flexible means for investigation into areas of special in- 
terest related to urban design. It is intended primarily to encourage independent 
study and research. 

UD 595 Environmental Perception. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 3(3-0) S. 
The course is designed to acquaint the student with the theories and research on the 
perception of urban environments. Emphasis is placed on the visual attributes as 
well as user perceptions of the envirormient with a focus on the structuring of re- 
search to explore these dimensions. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 269 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

UD 601 Urban Design Workshop IL Prerequisite: UD 502. 6(0-12) F. Analysis of 
complex environmental problems ranging in scale from area redevelopment to new 
towns design. 

UD 602 Advanced Problems in Urban Design. Prerequisite: UD 601. 6(0-12) S. 
Investigation of current urban design problems with special emphasis on individual 
research and investigation. 

UD 690 Special Topics in Urban Design IL Prerequisite: Interdisciplinary core 
and integrative core in urban design. 1-6 F,S. A course designed to allow for inde- 
pendent study and research in areas of special interest for graduate students in ur- 
ban design only. 



Water Resources 

(An interdepartmental, intercampus graduate program) 

WATER RESOURCES COMMITTEE^RALEIGH CAMPUS 

Dr. E. H. Wiser (Biological and Agricultural Engineering), Chairman 

Dr. W. J. Block (Politics), Dr. M. T. Huish (Zoology), Dr. D. W. Hayne (Statis- 
tics), Prof. D. H. How^ells (Water Resources Research Institute) — Secretary, 
Dr. V. A. Jones (Food Science), Dr. J. W. Gilliam (Soil Science), Dr. T. E. 
Maki (Forestry), Dr. D. B. Marsland (Chemical Engineering), Dr. W. T. 
McKean Jr. (Wood and Paper Science), Dr. H. H. Neunzig (Entomology), 
Prof. H. A. Rutherford (Textile Chemistry), Dr. E. D. Seneca (Botany), 
Dr. J. A. Seagraves (Economics), Dr. T. J. Sheets (Pesticide Residue Re- 
search Laboratory), Prof. C. Smallwood (Civil Engineering), Dr. C. W. 
Welby (Geosciences), Prof. R. R. Wilkinson (Landscape Architecture) 

Water resources management is a major issue throughout the country, and na- 
tional policy supports strong water resources programs at all levels of govemment. 
These are multidisciplinary and require understanding of the complex effects of 
conservation and development. They require well-trained specialists in engineering 
and the physical, biological and social sciences who also possess a sound grasp of 
overall objectives and a full appreciation of the respective roles of the participating 
disciplines. 

Water resources is generally considered to be an area of specialization and not a 
discipline. Graduate education provides an opportunity for broad training in water- 
related subjects along with intense study in the major disciplines. Students are en- 
couraged to reach beyond their own departments for courses to extend their range 
of understanding and to participate in water resources courses and seminars de- 
signed to develop interdisciplinary communication and a basis for future working 
relationships. 

A large number of courses related to water resources conservation, development 



270 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



and management are currently offered on the North Carohna State University and 
University of North CaroHna at Chapel Hill campuses. In order to capitalize on the 
combined training resources of both campuses and to offer them in an organized 
way to graduate students seeking interdisciplinary training in this field, an inter- 
campus graduate minor in water resources has been established. 

The program offers a strong graduate minor in water resources, with the major 
in any of the basic disciplines contributing to water resources planning, conserva- 
tion, development and management. The graduate courses currently offered on 
both campuses have been separated into the following general areas: 

Water law and institutions 

Planning of water resources and related systems 

Municipal and industrial water management 

Agricultural and forest water management 

Aquatic biology and ecology 

Hydrology and hydrogeology 

Graduate students majoring in any discipline closely allied with one of the desig- 
nated water resource areas will be qualified for admission to the program. They 
will be expected to select their water resources minor courses fi-om one or more 
areas outside their major. The cohesive elements in the graduate program will be 
two interdisciplinary core courses including a water resources seminar and a course 
in water resources planning or water resources economics. 

The minimal course requirements for a graduate minor in water resources are: 

Master's Degree— The two core courses in water resources plus two courses in 
water resource areas outside the major discipline approved by the student's advi- 
sory committee; 

Ph.D. Degree— The two core courses in water resources plus five other courses 
in water resource areas outside the major discipline approved by the student's ad- 
visory committee. The complete listing of courses available under this program is 
as follows: 



WATER RESOURCES CORE COURSES 

*Campu8 Course Title 

R CE 591 Civil Engineering Seminar. (Water Re- 

sources Seminar) 

Water Resources Seminar. 
Water Resources Economics. 

Planning of Natural Resource and En- 
vironmental Systems. (Including Water 
Resource Systems) 

LAW AND INSTITUTIONS OF WATER RESOURCES 

Public Administration. 
The Budgetary Process. 
Public Policy Analysis. 



CH 


ENVR 183 


R 


EC 515 




or 


CH 


PLAN 234 (ENVR 284) 



R 


PS 502 (ED 502)** 


R 


PS 511 


R 


PS 516 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



271 



R 

R 

CH 

CH 

CH 

CH 

CH 



PS 542 
PS 552 
PLAN 230 
ENVR 283** 
POLI 101*** 
POLI 238 
POLI 181 



Governmental Planning. 
Seminar in Management Systems. 
Planning Law. 
(PLAN 233**) Natural Resource Law and Policy. 
Public Administration. 
Intergovernmental Relations. 
National Policy and Administration. 



PLANNING OF WATER RESOURCES AND RELATED SYSTEMS 



R 

R 

CH 

CH 

CH 

CH 
CH 
CH 
CH 
CH 



CE 575** 
EC 490 
ENVR 214 
ENVR 215 
ENVR 217** 

ENVR 277 
GEOG 156 
PLAN 219 
PLAN 232 (ENVR 
PLAN 241 



282)^ 



Civil Engineering Systems. 
Senior Seminar in Economics. 
Environmental Issues and Decisions. 
Environmental Assessment. 
Systems Analysis in Environmental 
Planning. 

Engineering Project Design. 
Geography of Natural Resources. 
Environmental Systems Analysis. 
Public Investment Theory. 
Environmental Planning. 



MUNICIPAL AND INDUSTRIAL WATER MANAGEMENT 



R 
R 
R 

R 

R 
R 

R 

R 
R 

R 
R 

R 

R 

CH 
CH 
CH 
CH 
CH 
CH 

CH 

CH 



BAE 578 (CE 578) 
CE 484 
CE 571 
CE 572 

CE 573 

CE 574 (NE 574) 

CE 671 

CE 672 
CE 673 

CE 674 
TC 401 

FS 690 
WPS 525 

ENVR 122 

ENVR 171** 

ENVR 174 

ENVR 223 

ENVR 231** 

ENVR 272** 

ENVR 273 

ENVR 275 



Agricultural Waste Management. 
Water Resources Engineering II. 
Theory of Water and Waste Treatment. 
Unit Operations and Processes in Wastes 
Engineering. 

Analysis of Water and Wastes. 
Environmental Consequences of Nuclear 
Power. 

Advanced Water Supply and Waste 
Water Disposal. 

Advanced Water and Waste Treatment. 
Industrial Water Supply and Waste 
Disposal. 

Stream Sanitation. 

The Textile Industry and the Environ- 
ment. 

Seminar in Food Science. 
Pollution Abatement in Forest Products 
Industries. 
Water Chemistry. 

Principles of Water Quality Management. 
Water and Waste Treatment Processes. 
Trace Analysis. 
Environmental Microbiology. 
Water Supply and Wastewater Disposal 
Systems. 

Water and Wastewater Treatment 
Plant Design. 
Industrial Water Quality Management. 



AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST WATER MANAGEMENT 
R BAE 321 



Irrigation, Terracing and Erosion 
Control. 



272 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



R 


BAE 472 


R 


FOR 452 


R 


FOR 472 


R 


FOR 501 


R 


FOR 692 


R 


RRA 440 


R 


SSC 461** 


AQUATIC BIOLOGY AND ECOLOGY 


R 


BAE 570 (CE 570, MB 570) 


R 


BO 560 (ZO 560)** 


R 


BO 574 (MB 574) 


R 


MAS 529 (ZO 529) 


R 


MAS 693 


R 


ZO 420 


R 


ZO 519** 


R 


ZO 619 


R 


ZO 621 


CH 


BOTN 114 


CH 


BOTN 141 


CH 


BOTN 216 


CH 


ENVR 132** 


CH 


ENVR 225 (MSCS 105) 


CH 


ENVR 233 


CH 


ENVR 235 


CH 


ZOOL 108 


CH 


ZOOL 109** 


CH 


ZOOL 126 (MSCS 101)** 


CH 


ZOOL 140 S (MSCS 104 S)** 


CH 


ZOOL 141 S 


CH 


ZOOL 146 


CH 


ZOOL 213 


CH 


ZOOL 226 


HYDRC 


)LOGY AND HYDROGEOLOGY 


R 


BAE 671 (SSC 671) 


R 


BAE 674 (SSC 674) 


R 


CE 383** 


R 


CE 580 


R 


CE 581 (MAS 581) 


R 


CE 643 


R 


CE 644 


R 


GY 400 


R 


GY 563 


R 


GY 565** 


R 


GY 567 


R 


GY 581 


R 


OY 487 (MAS 487, CE 487) 


R 


GY 584 (MAS 584) 


R 


MY 411 


R 


MY 486 


R 


MY 555 



Agricultural Water Management. 

Silvics. 

Renewable Resource Management. 

Forest Influences and Watershed 

M anagement. 

Advanced Forest Management Problems. 

Recreation Resources Inventory and 

Planning. 

Soil and Water Conservation. 



Sanitary MicrobicJogy. 

Principles of Ecology. 

Phycology. 

Biological Oceanog^raphy. 

Special Topics in M arine Sciences. 

(Estuarine Ecology) 

Fishery Science. 

Limnology. 

Advanced Limnology. 

Fishery Science. 

Algae. 

Ecology. 

Marine Algae. 

Limnology and Water Pollution. 

Chemical Oceanography. 

Microbial Ecology. 

Ecology of Phytoplankton. 

Ecology. 

Introduction to Hydrobiology. 

Oceanography. 

Biological Oceanography. 

Special Problems in Marine Biology. 

Marine Ecology. 

Advanced Marine Ecology. 

Ecological and General Systems Theory. 



Theory of Drainage: Saturated Flow. 
Theory of Drainage: Unsaturated Flow. 
Water Resources Engineering I. 
Flow in Open Channels. 
Introduction to Oceanographic 
Engineering. 

Hydraulics of Ground Water. 
Ground Water Eng^ineering. 
Environmental Geology. 
Applied Sedimentology Analysis. 
Hydroge<Jogy. 
Geochemistry. 
Geomorphology. 
487) Physical Oceanography. 
Marine Geology. 
Introductory Meteorology. 
Weather and Climate. 
Meteorology of the Biosphere. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



273 



R 


SSC 511 


Soil Physics. 


CH 


ENVR 281 


Topics in Advanced Hydrology. 


CH 


GEOG 110 


Meteorology. 


CH 


GEOG 112 


M i cr om eteor ol ogy. 


CH 


GEOG 115 


Climatology. 


CH 


GEOG 117 


Soils. 


CH 


GEOG 156 


Natural Resources. 


CH 


GEOL 104 


Geomorphology. 


CH 


GEOL 142 


Principles of Geochemistry. 


CH 


GEOL 173 (MSCS 103) 


Geological Oceanography. 


CH 


GEOL 242 


Physical Geochemistry. 


CH 


GEOL 247 


Sedimentation. 


CH 


GEOL 250 


Advanced Sedimentation. 


CH 


MSCS 102 


Physical Oceanography. 


CH 


MSCS 206 


Seminar on Oceanography. 



* Courses bearing the prefix "R" are taught at Raleigh and those bearing "CH" at Chapel Hill. 
Unlisted courses can be substituted for listed courses with the approval of the student's advisory 
committee. 
** Courses from which requirements for master's degree minor will normally be met. Substitutions 
can be made with approval of the student's advisory committee. 
*** Prerequisites can be waived for graduate students with water resources minor. 

Request for information regarding the water resources graduate programs should 
be directed to the Chairman of the Water Resources Committee, the departments 
represented on the Water Resources Committee or the Water Resources Research 
Institute, 124 Riddick Building, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N.C. 
27607. 



Wood and Paper Science 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor I. S. Goldstein, Head 

Professors: R. M. Carter, E. B. Cowung, E. L. Ellwood— Dean School of Forest 
Resources; C. A. Hart, R. G. Hitchings, R. J. Thomas; Extension Professor: 
A. C. Barefoot Jr.; Professor Emeritus: A. J. Stamm; Adjunct Professor: 
P. KocH; Associate Professors: H. Chang, J. S. Gratzl, M. P. Levi, W. T. 
McKean Jr., R. G. Pearson, R. H. Reeves, D. H. J. Steensen; Associate 
Professor Emeritus: C. G. Landes; Adjunct Associate Professors: K. P. 
Kringstad, R. K. Stevens; Assistant Professor: M. W. Kelly; Extension 
Assistant Professor: F. J. Hill; Research Associate: C. L. Chen 

Graduate study programs leading to the Master of Science and the Doctor of 
Philosophy degrees are offered for students in a wide variety of areas in the field of 
wood and paper science. The Master of Wood and Paper Science is available for 
students who do not wish to emphasize research in their graduate study program. 

Because the field of wood and paper science is a derived science, considerable 
emphasis is placed upon developing a strong minor in the graduate program in any 
one or more of the supporting disciplines such as organic chemistry, polymer chem- 
istry, chemical engineering, mathematics, statistics, biology, engineering mechan- 



274 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ics, mechanical engineering, physics, economics or business administration. 

Areas of study and research in pulp and paper science and technology cover 
wood and fiber chemistry, lignin and carbohydrate chemistry, pulping chemistry, 
pollution abatement processes, fiber and paper properties, and paper coatings and 
additives. In wood science and technology, study and research areas include wood 
physics (especially wood liquid relations), wood chemistry, wood biology, wood 
mechanics and engineering, manufacturing processes, operations research applica- 
tions, wood industry economics and marketing. 

Modem facilities are completely equipped to conduct education and research in 
all forms of wood and fiber processing. Included are specialized laboratories for 
study of wood physics, wood anatomy, wood processing, wood engineering, wood 
chemistry, pulping, papermaking, paper testing and paper coating. Equipment 
available includes optical and electron microscopes, a range of spectrophotometers, 
an ultracentrifuge, membrane osmometers, electron spin resonance and nuclear 
magnetic resonance apparatus. 

Prerequisites for graduate study in the department are an undergraduate degree 
in wood science, pulp and paper science or in related disciplines such as any of a 
number of branches of science or engineering. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis. Prerequisite: WPS 321, 322. 3(0-«) S. 

WPS 411, 412 Pulp and Paper Unit Processes I, II. Prerequisite: CHE 301, 302. 3 
(3-0) F,S. 

WPS 413 Paper Properties and Additives. 3(1-6) F. 

WPS 423 (FOR 423) Logging and Milling. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3(2-3) 
F. 

WPS 434 Wood Operations. Prerequisites: WPS 301, 302. 3(2-3) F. 

WPS 435 (FOR 435) Systems Analysis in Forest Products. Prerequisite: Senior 
standing. 3(3-0) S. 

WPS 441 Introduction to Wood Mechanics. Prerequisite: MA 212, PY 221 or PY 
211. 2(2-0) F. 

WPS 442 Wood Mechanics and Design. Prerequisite: EM 211 or WPS 441. 3(2-3) 
S. 

WPS 461 Paper Converting. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 1(1-0) S. 

WPS 463 Plant Inspections. Prerequisite: Senior standing in pulp and paper. 
1(0-3) S. 

WPS 471 Pulping Process Analysis. 3(1-6) F. 

WPS 481 Pulping Processes and Products. Prerequisites: WPS 202, CH 103. 2 

(2-0) S. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 275 



WPS 491 (FOR 491) Senior ProWems in Forest Resources. Prerequisite: Consent 
of department. Credits Arranged. 

WPS 492 (FOR 492) Senior Problems in Forest Resources. Prerequisite: Consent 
of department. Credits Arranged. 

FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

WPS 513 Tropical Woods. Prerequisites: WPS 203, 301. 2(1-3) F. Structure, iden- 
tification, properties, characteristics and use of tropical woods, especially those used 
in plywood and furniture. Staff 

WPS 521, 522 Chemistry of Wood and Wood Products. Prerequisites: CH 315, CH 
331, WPS 202, PY 212. 3(2-3) F,S. Fundamental chemistry and physics of wood and 
wood components; pulping principles; electrical and thermal properties. Staff 

WPS 525 Pollution Abatement in Forest Products Industries. Prerequisite: Grad- 
uate or advanced undergraduate standing in science or engineering curricula. 3(3-0) 
S. Pollution sources, inplant control and treatment of water and air pollution in for- 
est products with concentration on the pulp and paper industry. McKean 

WPS 533 Advanced Wood Structure and Identification. Prerequisite: WPS 202. 2 
(1-3) F. Advanced microscopic identification of the commercial woods of the United 
States and some tropical woods; microscopic anatomical features and laboratory 
techniques. Thomas 

WPS 591 Wood and Paper Science Problems. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate 
standing. Credits Arranged. Assigned or selected problems in the field of silvicul- 
ture, logging, lumber manufacturing, pulp technology or forest management. 

Staff 

WPS 599 Methods of Research in Wood and Paper Science. Prerequisite: Senior 
or graduate standing. Credits Arranged. Research procedures, problem outlines, 
presentation of results; consideration of selected studies by forest research organi- 
zations; sample plot techniques. Staff 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

WPS 604 Timber Physics. Prerequisite: WPS 441. 3(3-0) F,S. Density, specific 
gravity and moisture content variation affecting physical properties; physics of dry- 
ing at high and low temperatures; thermal, sound, light and electrical properties of 
wood. Hart 

WPS 605 Design and Control of Wood Processes. Prerequisite: WPS 604. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Design and operational control of equipment for processing wood. Staff 

WPS 606 Wood Process Analysis. Prerequisite: WPS 604. 3(3-0) F. Analysis of 
wood process through the solution of comprehensive problems involving the physics 
of temperature and moisture relations. Staff 

WPS 607 Advanced Quality Control. Prerequisites: WPS 606, ST 515. 3(3-0) S. 
Advanced statistical quality control as applied to wood processing. Barefoot 

WPS 691 (FOR 691) Graduate Seminar. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 1(1-0) 



276 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



F,S. Presentation and discussion of progress reports on research, special problems 
and outstanding publications. Graduate Staff 

WPS 693 Advanced Wood Technology Problems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
Credits Arranged. Selected problems in the field of wood technology. 

Graduate Staff 

WPS 699 (FOR 699) Problems and Research. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 
Credits Arranged. Specific problems that will furnish material for a thesis. 

Graduate Staff 



Zoology 

GRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor D. E. Davis, Head 

Professors: F. S. Barkalow Jr., B. J. Copeland, D. S. Grosch, R. Harkema, W. 
W. Hassler, D. W. Hayne, J. E. Hobbie, C. F. Lytle, B. S. Martof, L. E. 
Mettler, G. C. Miller, T. L. Quay, D. E. Smith; Professor Emeritus: B. B. 
Brandt; Adjunct Professors: D. H. K. Lee, T. R. Rice, P. N. Witt; Associate 
Professors: Phyllis C. Bradbury, M. T. Huish, J. F. Roberts; Adjunct Asso- 
ciate Professors: J. G. Vandenbergh, D. A. Wolfe; Assistant Professors: G. T. 
Barthalmus, K. E. Muse, G. B. Pardue, G. G. Shaw, J. M. Whitsett, T. G. 
Wolcott; Adjunct Assistant Professors: F. A. Cross, G. R. Huntsman, 
G. W. Thayer; Visiting Assistant Professor: W. L. Rickards III 

The Department of Zoology offers to qualified students the opportunity to earn 
the Master of Science and the Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Students may special- 
ize in many areas: behavior, general ecology, population dynamics, limnology, ma- 
rine biology, fisheries biology, wildlife biology, taxonomy and ecological life histor- 
ies of parasites, comparative morphology and systematics of vertebrates, cellular 
and comparative physiology, and endocrinology. For certain specialities, a Master's 
degree without a thesis is awarded. 

The department is located in Gardner Hall where facilities for a wide variety of 
research activities are available. Opportunity for many types of ecological studies is 
provided in the extensive natural areas of state parks; some are only six miles fi-om 
campus. Several off-campus laboratories are available to students and staff. 

By mutual agreement, a student may choose to do research with any member of 
the graduate staff. A student will make up a plan of study after discussing his inter- 
ests and objectives with his major professor and advisory committee. Those courses 
will be selected that best prepare one for one's particular interests. Advanced 
courses in other departments provide a variety of subjects for minor fields of study: 
biochemistry, biomathematics, botany, ecology, entomology, genetics, psychology, 
statistics and other rdated sciences. The student is given the opportunity to devel- 
op a high order of independent thought, broad knowledge, technical skills and 
thorough training in investigative techniques. Strong emphasis is placed on active 
participation in seminars, practice in the methods of original research and prepara- 
tion of manuscripts for publication in scientific journals. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 277 



A prospective student must submit Graduate Record Examination scores for the 
verbal, quantitative and advanced tests with the application for admission. 

SPECIAL FACILITIES FOR MARINE RESEARCH 

The Pamlico Marine Laboratory near Aurora, North Carolina, is located on the 
Pamlico River Estuary not far from Pamlico Sound. The research concerns both 
basic marine ecology and the effects of man's activities on the natural estuarine en- 
vironment, particularly industrial and domestic pollution. 

The Mid- Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Research Center at Beaufort, North Carolina 
is supported by the National Marine Fisheries Service and by the Atomic Energy 
Commission. After consultation with his adviser a student may arrange to conduct 
research at the facilities at Beaufort. 

The Hatteras Marine Laboratory is located at the southern end of Hatteras Is- 
land, North Carolina, where a variety of interesting biological habitats occur. Cape 
Hatteras is the closest point to the Gulf Stream north of Daytona Beach, Florida. 
Both northern and southern faunas are found in adjacent waters. 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ZO 400 Biological Basis of Man's Environment. Prerequisite: Junior standing. 3 

(2-2) F,S. 

ZO 401 (ENT 401) BiUiographic Research in Biology. 1(1-0) F. (See entomology, 

page 147.) 

ZO 414 (BO 414) Cell Biology. 3(3-0) F. (See botany, page 8 L) 

ZO 415 Cellular and Animal Physiology Laboratory. Corequisite: ZO 414 or ZO 

42L 2(0-5) F,S. 

ZO 420 Fishery Science. Prerequisites: ZO 201, ZO 360. 3(2-3) F. 

ZO 421 Vertebrate Physiology. Prerequisites: CH 223, PY 212, ZO 201. 3(3-0) F,S. 

ZO 441 Ichthyology. Prerequisite: ZO 223 or ZO 351. 3(2-3) S. 



FOR GRADUATES AND ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 

ZO 501 Ornithology. Prerequisites: ZO 223 or ZO 351, ZO 421. 3(2-3) F,S. The 
biology of birds: systematics, physiology, life histories, ecology and behavior. 

Quay 

ZO 503 (PSY 503) Comparative Psychology. 3(3-0) S. (See psychology, 
page 236.) 

ZO 510 Adaptive Behavior of Animals. Prerequisite: ZO 421 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 4(3-3) F. The comparative study of animal behavior including a treatment of 
physiological mechanisms and adaptive significance. Both invertebrates and verte- 
brates are studied. Whitsett 

ZO 513 (PHY 513) Comparative Physiology. Prerequisites: ZO 421 or consent of 
instructor. 4(3-3) S. A comparative study of the organ systems of vertebrates and 



278 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



the physiological processes involved in maintaining the homeostatic state. The var- 
ious compensatory mechanisms employed during environmental stress are included. 

Lee 

ZO 515 Growth and Reproduction of Fishes. Prerequisites or corequisites: GN 
411, ZO 420, ZO 421, ZO 441. 3(2-3) S. The biology of fishes: physiology, anatomy, 
pathology, behavior and genetics. This course is designed especially for graduate 
students in fisheries. Several trips to research laboratories are taken. (Offered in 
spring 1975 and alternate years.) Pardue 

ZO 517 Population Ecology. Prerequisites: ZO 360 (BO 360) and ST 511 or equi- 
valent. 3(3-0) S. The dynamics of natural populations. Current work, theories and 
problems dealing with population growth, fluctuation, limitation and patterns of 
dispersion, the ecological niche, food chains and energy flow. Emphasis on methods 
of study. Hayne 

ZO 519 Limnology. Prerequisite: ZO 360 (BO 360) or equivalent. 4(3-3) F. A study 
of inland waters. Lectures dealing with physical, chemical and biolo^cal factors 
that affect freshwater organisms. General principles are illustrated in the labora- 
tory and on field trips. Hobbie 

250 524 (PC 524) Comparative Endocrinology. 4(3-3) S. (See poultry science, 
page 232.) 

ZO 529 (MAS 529) Biological Oceanography. Prerequisite: ZO 360 (BO 360) or 
consent of instructor. 3(3-0) S. A comprehensive course stressing the dynamic inter- 
relationships between organisms of the sea and their physical and chemical environ- 
ment. The latter part of the course will examine fundamental concepts in biological 
oceanography and will particularly stress experimental methods. 

ZO 532 (GN 532) Biological Effects of Radiations. 3(3-0) S. (See genetics, page 

158.) 

ZO 540 (GN 540) Evolution. 3(3-0) F. (See genetics, page 158.) 

ZO 542 Herpetology. Prerequisites: ZO 223 or ZO 351, ZO 421. 3(2-3) S. The biol- 
ogy of the amphibians and reptiles: systematics, life history, anatomy, behavior, 
physiology and ecology. Martof 

ZO 544 Mammalogy. Prerequisites: ZO 223 or ZO 351, consent of instructor. 3 
(2-3) S. The classification, identification and ecology of the major groups of mam- 
mals. Barkalow 

ZO 550 (GN 550) Experimental Evolution. 3(3-0) F. (See genetics, page 159.) 

ZO 553 Principles of Wildlife Science. Prerequisite: ZO 360 (BO 360). 3(2-3) F. 
The principles of wildlife management and their application are studied in the lab- 
oratory and in the field. Doerr 

ZO 555 (MB 555) Protozoology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 4(2-6) S. The 
biology of the Protozoa: lectures include morphology, physiology, ecology, genetics, 
reproduction, evolution, systematics and life-cycles of both fi-ee-living and parasitic 
taxa; laboratory will stress reco^ition of selected forms and demonstrate techni- 
ques used to prepare specimens for microscopic examination. Bradbury 

ZO 560 (BO 560) Principles of Ecology. Prerequisite: Three semesters of college- 
level biology courses. 4(3-3) F. A consideration of the principles of ecology at the 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 279 



graduate level. Each of the major subject areas of ecology is developed in sufficient 
depth to provide a factual and philosophical framework for the understanding of 
ecology. Shaw, Blimi 

ZO 575 (PHY 575, ENT 575) Physiology of Invertebrates. 3(3-0) F. (See physi- 
ology, page 220.) 

ZO 581 Helminthology. Prerequisites: ZO 223 or ZO 351, ZO 315 or equivalent. 4 
(2-4) F. The study of the morphology, biology and control of the parasitic helminths. 

Miller 

ZO 582 (ENT 582) Medical and Veterinary Entomology. 3(2-3) S. (See entomol- 
ogy, page 149.) 

ZO 590 Special Studies. Prerequisites: Twelve hours zoology, consent of instruc- 
tor. Credits Arranged F,S. A directed individual investigation of a particular prob- 
lem in zoology, accompanied by a review of the pertinent literature. A maximum of 
three hours is allowed toward the master's degree. Graduate Staff 

ZO 592 Topical Problems, Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 1-3 F,S. Organized, 
formal lectures and discussion of a special topic. Graduate Staff 



FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ZO 603 Advanced Parasitology. Prerequisite: ZO 581. 3(2-3) S. The study of the 
theoretical and practical aspects of parasitism; taxonomy, physiology and immunol- 
ogy of animal parasites. Harkema, Roberts 

ZO 610 Current Aspects of Animal Behavior. Prerequisite: ZO 510 or equivalent. 4 
(3-3) S. Lectures, discussions, seminars and laboratories. The course will treat in 
detail selected aspects of the behavior of invertebrates and vertebrates. The rela- 
tionship of behavior to physiology, ecology and other related biological fields will be 
emphasized. Whitsett 

ZO 614 Advanced Cell Biology. Prerequisite: ZO 414 (BO 414) or equivalent. 3 
(3-0) S. A study of the current problems of cell biology including the problems of the 
molecular organization and functions of membrane systems, subcellular organelles 
and specialized cells. Roberts, Smith 

ZO 619 Advanced Limnology. Prerequisite: ZO 519. 3(1-6) S. A study of primary 
productivity, popvilation interactions and effects of pollution. An experimental ap- 
proach is used in the laboratory. Hobbie 

ZO 621 Fishery Science. Prerequisite: ST 511, ZO 420, a course in calculus. 3 
(2-3) F. An analysis of fishery research methods. Population enumeration and dyna- 
mics. The relationship between fluctuations in natural populations and environmen- 
tal factors. (Offered 1974 and alternate years.) Hassler 

ZO 660 (BO 660) Advanced Topics in Ecology L 4(3-3) S. (See botany, page 84.) 

ZO 661 (BO 661) Advanced Topics in Ecology IL Prerequisite: ZO 560 (BO 560) 
or equivalent. 4(3-3) S. Reports and seminar discussions of five major topics, such as 
secondary productivity, competitive exclusion, predator-prey and other interspecies 
relationships, regulation of populations, physiological ecology and management of 
resources. Some field trips. Laboratory provides experience in analysis of ecological 
systems, modeling and computer simulation. (Offered 1973 and alternate years.) 

Graduate Staff 



280 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



ZO 690 Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. The presentation and defense of original research and 
current literature. Graduate Staff 

ZO 699 Research in Zoology. Prerequisite: Twelve semester credits in zoology 
and approval of instructor. Credits Arranged. F,S. 



North Carolina State University in striving to provide suitable accommodations 
for its students operates 16 residence halls, as well as married student apartments. 




THE GRADUATE CATALOG 281 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

North Carolina State University 

Term expires 

Walter L. Smith, Charlotte, Chairman 1977 

Grover a. Gore, Southport, Vice Chairman 1975 

Mary Virginia McFadyen, Raeford, Secretary 1975 
Helen Mann, Raleigh, Assistant Secretary 

Robert J. Brown, High Point 1975 

Dr. W. W. Dickson, Gastonia 1977 

C.A.Dillon, Jr., Raleigh 1975 

J. M. Peden, Jr., Raleigh 1977 

PfflLiP H. Pitts, Glen Alpine 1975 

J. W. Pou, Greenville 1977 

Zeno Ratcuff, Jr., Pantego 1975 

Lexie L. Ray, Burlington 1977 

Fred L. Wilson, Kannapolis 1977 
Terry N. Carroll, President, Student Government ex officio 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

The University of North Carolina 

William A. Dees, Jr., Chairman 
W. Earl Britt, Vice Chairman 
Louis T. Randolph, Secretary 

Terms Expiring in 1975 

Clark S. Brown, Winston-Salem 
Lenox G. Cooper, Wilmington 
Mrs. Howard Holderness, Greensboro 
John R. Jordan, Jr., Raleigh 
J. Aaron Prevost, Hazelwood 
Louis T. Randolph, Washington 
William B. Rankin, Lincolnton 
W. W. Taylor, Jr., Raleigh 

Terms Expiring in 1977 

Victor S. Bryant, Durham 
George Watts Hill, Durham 
Wallace N. Hyde, Asheville 
Robert B. Jordan, in. Mount Gilead 
Mrs. Albert H. Lathrop, Asheville 
Reginald F. McCoy. Laurinburg 
Maceo a. Sloan, Durham 
Thomas J. White, Jr., Kinston 

Terms Expiring in 1979 

W. Earl Britt, Lumberton 
Julius L. Chambers, Charlotte 
Dr. Hugh S. Daniel, Jr., Waynesville 
William A. Dees, Jr., Goldsboro 
Jacob H. Froeuch, Jr., High Point 
WiLUAM A. Johnson, Lillington 



282 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



E. B. Turner, Lumberton 

Mrs. George D. Wilson, Fayetteville 

Terms Expiring in 1981 

Hugh Cannon, Raleigh 
Philip G. Carson, Asheville 
T. Worth Coltrane, Asheboro 
Luther H. Hodges, Jr., Charlotte 
Mrs. Hugh Morton, Linville 
David J. Whichard, II, Greenville 
John W. Winters, Raleigh 
George M. Wood, Camden 



The new University Student Center houses food service facilities, an SlS-seat 
theater, an art gallery, a television room, a games room, student government offices 
and meeting rooms. 




THE GRADUATE CATALOG 283 



GRADUATE FACULTY 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY 

Charlie Frank Abrams, Jr., Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricvltural 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Daniel Morton A. Adams, Assistant Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Elsayed M. Afify, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Raul Eduardo Alvarez, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Michael Amein, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Charles Eugene Anderson, Associate Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Cufton a. Anderson, Professor of Industrial Engineering and Henry A. Foscue 

Professor of Furniture Manufacturing and Management. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Donald Benton Anderson, Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Norman Dean Anderson, Professor of Science Education. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Jay Lawrence Apple, Professor of Plant Pathology and Genetics and Assistant 

Director of Academic Affairs and Research for the Biological Sciences. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Frank Bradley Armstrong, University Professor of Genetics, Microbiology and 

Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Leonard William Aurand, Professor of Food Science and Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
William Wyatt Austin, Jr., Professor of Materials Engineering and Head of the 

Department. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
Charles Wilson Averre, III, Extension Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Richard Charles Axtell, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Robert Aycock, Professor of Plant Pathology and Horticultural Science and Head 

of the Department of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Mahmoud Amin Ayoub, Visiting Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., Texas Technological University. 
Willard Farrington Babcock, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Walter Debele Bach, Jr., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Meteorology. 

Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 
James Ronald Bailey, Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Southampton. 



* Membership in the graduate faculty may be in either of two categories: (1) fiill status or (2) asso- 
ciate status. Full status permits a faculty member to engage in any and all phases of the graduate 
programs of the University. Associate members may teach courses at the graduate level and serve 
as chairmen of master's advisory committees. 



284 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



John Albert Bailey, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., University College of Swansea. 
Jack Vernon Baird, Extension Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Washington State University. 
James Robert Baker, Extension Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Kansas. 
Brenda C. Ball, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
David Stafford Ball, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Hershell Ray Ball, Jr., Assistant Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
Walter Elmer Ballinger, Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
William John Barclay, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 
Aldos Cortez Barefoot, Jr., Extension Professor of Wood and Paper Science and 

Leader, Wood Products Section, Ext. Forest Resources. 

D.F., Duke University. 
Frederick Schenck Barkalow, Jr., Professor of Zoology and Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Kenneth Reece Barker, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Key Lee Barkley, Professor Emeritus of Psychology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Donald Warren Barnes, Jr., Assistant Professor of Architectiere. 

M.A., University of California. 
RoLiN Farrar Barrett, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Elliott Roy Barrick, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
George Timothy Barthalmus, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Mervin Jerome Bartholomew, Assistant Professor of Geology. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
William Victor Bartholomew, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Peter Batchelor, Associate Professor of Urban Design. 

M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 
Edward Guy Batte, Professor of Animal Science. 

D.V.M., Texas A & M University. 
Gerald Robert Baughman, Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
David Lee Bayless, Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., Texas A & M University. 
Kenneth Orion Beatty, Jr., R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Professor of Chemi- 
cal Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Joe Robert Beeler, Jr., Professor of Nuclear BSngineering and Materials Engineer- 
ing. 

Ph.D., Kansas University. 
Burton Floyd Beers, Professor of History. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Robert Frank Behlow, Extension Professor of Animal Science. 

D.V.M., Ohio State University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 285 



Norman Robert Bell, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

M.S., Cornell University. 
Thomas Alexander Bell, Professor (USDA) of Food Science. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Willard Harrison Bennett, Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Gerald Earl Bennington, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Ray Braman Benson, Jr., Associate Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Henry Albert Bent, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Richard Harold Bernhard, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Leonidas Judd Betts, Jr., Associate Professor of English and Education. 

Ed.D., Duke University. 
Marvin Kenneth Beute, Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
BiBHUTi Bhushan Bhattacharyya, Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., London School of Economics. 
William Louis Bingham, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
George Lee Bireline, Jr., Associate Professor of Design. 

M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
John William Bishir, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
David Hatton Black, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., Leeds University. 
Carl Thomas Blake, Extension Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Phiup Everett Blank, Jr., Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
William Joseph Block, Professor of Politics and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D. University of Illinois. 
William Lowry Blow, Associate Professor Emeritus of Poultry Science and Gene- 
tics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Udo Blum, Assistant Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., University of Oklahoma. 
Thomas Nelson Blumer, Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
John Francis Bogdan, Albert G. Myers Professor of Textiles and Head of the 

Departm,ent of Textile Technology. 

B.T.E., Lowell Textile Institute. 
James Raymond Bohannon, Jr., Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Edgar John Boone, Professor of Adult and Community College Education and Head 

of the Department and Assistant Director of Agricultural Extension Service. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Jon Bordner, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Carey Hoyt Bostian, Professor Emeritus of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
Henry Dittimus Bowen, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Lawrence Hoffman Bowen, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technolog^y. 



286 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Phylus Clarke Bradbury, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Julius Roscoe Bradley, Jr., Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
Charles Raymond Bramer, Riddick Professor of Civil Engineering. 

E.M., Michigan College of Mining and Technology. 
Bartholomew Brandner Brandt, Professor Ehneritus of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Eugene Paschal Brantly, Assistant Professor of Architecture. 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 
Charles Henry Brett, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Kansas State College. 
DiNUS Marshall Briggs, Assistant Professor ofPoidtry Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Richard Bright, Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineering. 

M.S., State University of Iowa. 
Charles Aloysius Brim, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Nebraska. 
Robert Curtis Brisson, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University, 
Robert Charles Brooks, Extension Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Wayne Maurice Brooks, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Henry Sea well Brown, Professor of Geosciences. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Marvin Luther Brown, Jr., Professor of History. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Peter Brown, Assistant Professor of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., Leeds University. 
William Jasper Brown, Jr., Adjunct Associate Professor of Agricultural Educa- 
tion. 

Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Carl Eddington Bryan, Research Associate in Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D. University of Minnesota. 
Robert Sedgwick Bryan, Professor of Philosophy and Head of the Department of 

Philosophy and Religion. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Charles Douglas Bryant, Associate Professor of Agricultural Education. 

Ed.D., Michigan State University. 
J. Bruce Bullock, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of California at Davis. 
Roberts Cozart Bullock, Professor Ehneritus of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Carl Lee Bumgardner, Professor of Chemistry and Acting Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Harvey Lindy Bumgardner, Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Stanley Walter Buol, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Lawrence G. Burk, Associate Professor (USDA) of Genetics. 

M.S., University of Georgia. 
Ernest Edmund Burniston, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Birkbeck College, London. 
Joseph Charles Burns, Associate Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 287 



Robert Paschal Burns, Jr., Professor of Architecture and Head of the Department. 

M.Arch., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Peter Michael Burrows, Visiting Assistant Professor of Statistics and Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Thaddeus Hillery Busbice, Associate Professor (USDA) of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Fred Virgil Cahill, Jr., Professor of Politics. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
John Tyler Caldwell, Professor of Politics and Chancellor. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Kenneth Stoddard Campbell, Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

B.S., Clemson University. 
Steven Lavern Campbell, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
William Vernon Campbell, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
John Robert Canada, Professor of Industrial Engineering and Assistant Dean of 

Engineering for Extension. 

Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology. 
Thomas Franklin Cannon, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
George Lafayette Capel, Extension Professor of Economics and Assistant Direc- 
tor of Extension Marketing and Special Programs. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Gerald A. Carlson, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of California at Davis. 
Charles Hope Carlton, Assistant Professor of History. 

Ph.D., University of California, 
Halbert Hart Carmichael, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Albert Carnesale, Professor and Head of Division of University Studies and 

Coordinator for Environmental Studies. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
William Lester Carpenter, Associate Professor of Adidt and Community College 

Education and Head of the Department of Agricultural Information. 

Ed.D., Florida State University. 
Daniel Edward Carroll, Jr., Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Robert Gordon Carson, Jr., Professor of Industrial Engineering and Associate 

Dean of the School of Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Robert James Carson, III, Assistant Professor of Geology. 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 
Roy Merwin Carter, Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

M.S., Michigan State College. 
Edward Vitangelo Caruolo, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
David Marshall Cates, Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Victor Viosca Cavaroc, Jr., Assistant Professor ofGeosciences. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
Thomas Courtney Caves, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Douglas Scales Chamblee, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Larry Stephen Champion, Professor of English and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 



288 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Richard Edward Chandler, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Graduate 

Administrator. 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
David Webb Chaney, Professor of Textiles and Dean of the School. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Hou-MiN Chang, Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 
TiEN-SuN Chang, Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan and University of Illinois. 
James F. Chaplin, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Joe Senter Chappell, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Harvey Johnson Charlton, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Albert Leon Chasson, Adjunct Associate Professor of Entomology. 

M. D., University of Cincinnati. 
Chen-Loung Chen, Research Associate in Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., University of Heidelberg. 
Erich Christian, Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Dipl. Ing., Vienna Institute of Technology. 
KwoNG Tuzz Chung, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo. 
John G. Clapp, Jr., Extension Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Roger H. Clark, Associate Professor of Architecture. 

M.Arch., University of Washington. 
Joseph Ray Clary, Adjunct Associate Professor of Education. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Albert J. Clawson, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Carlyle Newton Clayton, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Maurice Hill Clayton, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
William Bramwell Clifford, II, Associate Professor of Sociology and 

Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 
James Arthur Coalson, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 
Grover Cleveland Cobb, Jr., Associate Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
William Younts Cobb, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Harold D. Coble, Extension Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Fred Derward Cochran, Professor of Horticultural Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Columbus Clark Cockerham, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Statistics and 

Genetics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Eloise Snowden Cofer, Extension Professor of Food Science and Assistant Direc- 
tor, Agricultural Extension Service (Home Economics). 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
James Lawrence Cole, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
William Kerr Collins, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 289 



Newton Vaughan Colston, Jr., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
William Maxwell Col well, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
NoRVAL White Conner, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

M.S., Iowa State University. 
Maurice Gayle Cook, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Robert Edward Cook, Professor ofPovdtry Science and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Armand Vincent Cooke, Assistant Professor of Product Design. 

B.S.I.D., University of Cincinnati. 
Arthur Wells Cooper, Professor of Botany and Forest Resources. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
William Douglas Cooper, Associate Professor of Textile Technology and Econo- 
mics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Alonzo Freeman Coots, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
Will Allen Cope, Professor (USD A) of Crop Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Billy Joe Copeland, Professor of Zoology and Botany. 

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 
Frederick Thomas Corbin, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Franklin E. Correll, Professor of Horticultural Science. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Harold Maxwell Corter, Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
John K. Coster, Professor of Agricultural Education and Director of the Center for 

Occupational Education. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
Arthur James Coutu, Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Ellis Brevier Cowling, Professor of Plant Pathology, Forestry and Wood and 

Paper Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Frederick Russell Cox, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Gertrude Mary Cox, Professor Emeritus of Statistics. 

M.S., Iowa State University. 
Joseph H. Cox, Professor of Design. 

M.F.A., University of Iowa. 
Walter Lee Cox, Assistant Professor of Education. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
Harris Bradford Craig, Professor of Food Science and Associate Director of Aca- 
demic Affairs for the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Director of 

the Agricultural Institute. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Paul Day Cribbins, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Ford A. Cross, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Oregon State University. 
John Anthony Cuculo, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
George August Cummings, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 



290 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Joseph Wiluam Cunningham, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
James Alvin Daggerhart, Jr., Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert David Dahle, Extension Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
John Michael Anthony Danby, Professor of Mathematics and Physics. 

Ph.D., Manchester University, England. 
Edmund Pendleton Dandridge, Jr., Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Stylianos D. Danielopoulos, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Raymond Bryant Daniels, Professor (USDA) of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Walter Carl Dauterman, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Donald Gould Davenport, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Charles Bingham Davey, Professor of Soil Science, Forestry and Plant Pathology, 

and Head of the Department of Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Adam Clarke Davis, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
David Edward Davis, Professor of Zoology and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Henry Mauzee Davis, Adjunct Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Robert Foster Davis, Assistant Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Californi a at Berkeley. 
William Robert Davis, Professor of Physics. 

Doktor der Naturuiss, University of Hanover, Germany. 
Cleburn Gilchrist Dawson, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Donald Lee Dean, Professor of Civil Engineering and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
M. Keith DeArmond, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Arizona. 
Fred Roark DeJarnette, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and 

Graduate Administrator. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Donald Warren DeJong, Adjunct Associate Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Donald Ray Deuel, Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
James William Dickens, Professor (USDA) of Biological and Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Emmett Urcey Dillard, Associate Professor of Animal Scierwe and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
George Osmore Doak, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Walter Jerome Dobrogosz, Professor of Microbiology. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Wesley Osborne Doggett, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 291 



Carl John Dolce, Professor of Ediu;ation and Dean of the School of Ediication. 

Ed.D., Harvard University. 
William Emmert Donaldson, Professor ofPotdtry Science. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Clive Wellington Donoho, Jr., Professor of HoHicultural Science and Head of the 

Department. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Jesse Seymour Doouttle, Professor Emeritus of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 
William Grady Dotson, Jr., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Robert Alden Douglas, Professor of Engineering Mechanics and Associate Head of 

the Department. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Murray Scott Downs, Professor of History and Assistant Department Head. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Robert Jack Downs, Professor of Botany and Hortictdtural Science and Director of 

the Phytotron. 

Ph.D., George Washington University. 
Lawrence William Drabick, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Donald William Drewes, Professor of Psychology and Associate Director of 

National Center for Occupational Education. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Earl G. Droessler, Administrative Dean for Research and Professor of Geo- 

sciences. 

B.A., Loras College. 
John Warren Duffield, Professor of Forestry and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Harry Ernest Duncan, Extension Associate Professor of Plant Pathology and In 

Charge, Plant Pathology Extension. 

Ph.D., West Virginia University. 
Jack Davis Durant, Associate Professor of English and Director of the Graduate 

Programs. 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 
Eddie Echandi, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Arthur Raymond Eckels, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

D.Engr., Yale University. 
Herbert Martin Eckerun, Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
John Auert Edwards, Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Eugene J. Eisen, Professor of Animal Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Magdi Mohamed El-Kammash, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Gerald Hugh Elkan, Professor of Microbiology . 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Thomas Smith Elleman, Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Robert Neal Elliott, Associate Professor of History. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Don Edwin Ellis, Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 



292 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Walter Glenn Ellis, Assistant Professor of Politics. 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 
Eric Louis Ellwood, Professor of Wood and Paper Science, Dean of the School of 

Forest Resources and Assistant Director of Research, School of Agriculture and 

Life Sciences. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
Sal AH E. Elmaghraby, University Professor of Industrial Engineering and Operas- 

tions Research and Associate Department Head of Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Aly H. M. El-Shiekh, Associate Professor of Textile Technology. 

Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
John Frederick Ely, Professor of Civil Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Paul D. Emerson, Associate Professor and Head, Textile Machine Design and 

Development. 

B.S., Purdue University. 
Donald Allen Emery, Professor of Crap Science and Genetics and Coordinator 

Graduate Programs in the Department of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Donald H. Ensign, Visiting Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

M.L.A., University of Michigan. 
Edward Walter Erickson, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
John Lincoln Etchells, Professor (USD A) of Food Science and Microbiology . 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
James Brainerd Evans, Professor of Microbiology and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Ralph Eigil Fadum, Professor of Civil Engineering and Dean of the School of 

Engineering. 

S.D., Harvard University. 
Abdel-Aziz Fahmy, Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Sheffield. 
Maurice Hugh Farrier, Professor of Entomology and Forestry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Gary Lottridge Faulkner, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Robert Morcom Fearn, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Richard Mark Felder, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Graduate 

Administrator. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
James K. Ferrell, Alcoa Professor of Chemical Engineering and Head of the 

Department. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
William Thomas Fike, Jr., Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D. University of Minnesota. 
Alva Leroy Finkner, Adjunct Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Charles Page Fisher, Jr., Adjunct Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Roger Carl Fites, Associate Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
James Walter Fitts, Professor of Soil Science, and Coordinator AID Latin 

American Soil Testing Project. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Henry Pridgen Fleming, Associate Professor (USDA) of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 293 



Walter A. Flood, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Vincent M. Foote, Associate Professor of Proditct Design and Acting Head of the 

Department. 

B.S., University of Cincinnati. 
Robert Joseph Fornaro, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Raymond Earl Fornes, Assistant Professor of Textiles and Physics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Benjamin Eagles Fountain, Adjunct Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
James R. Fouts, Adjunct Professor of Entomology and Toxicology. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Jack Lee Franklin, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Indiana University. 
William Glenwood Franklin, Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Leon David Freedman, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Ronald Owen Fulp, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Auburn University. 
A. Ronald Gallant, Assistant Professor of Economics and Statistics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
William Sylvan Galler, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Gene John Galletta, Professor of Horticultural Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Bertram Howard Garcia, Jr., Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Bruce Lynn Gardner, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Robin Pierce Gardner, Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Chemical Engi- 
neering. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Jimmy Dale Garlich, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Dennis Evo Garoutte, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Montana State University. 
James Wade Gault, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
Marvin Harlan Gehle, Extension Assistant Professor of Poultry Science and 

Coordinator of Institutional Studies and Planning. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Ralph Cellar, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
James Dalton George, Extension Professor of Rural Sociology and Adult and 

Com.munity College Education. 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
Thomas Waller George, Associate Professor of Textile Technology. 

M.A., University of Illinois. 
Thomas Michael Gerig, Assistant Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Dan Ulrich Gerstel, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Crop Science and 

Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of California. 



294 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Forrest William Getzen, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
George Gosselin Giddings, Assistant Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Francis Gerhard Giesbrecht, Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Richard Dean Gilbert, Professor of Textile Chemistry and Chairman of the Grad- 
uate Studies Committee for the Fiber and Polymer Science Program. 

Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 
William Best Gilbert, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
James Wendell Gilliam, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Mississippi State University. 
Stanley Eugene Gilliland, Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Joseph Conrad Glass, Jr., Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
Edward Walker Glazener, Professor of Poultry Science and Genetics and Asso- 
ciate Dean and Director of Academic Affairs, School of Agriculture and Life 

Sciences. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Chester Eugene Gleit, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
TiLDON H. Glisson, Jr., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Southern Methodist University. 
Alfred John Goetze, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Harvey Joseph Gold, Associate Professor of Statistics and Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
George Goldfinger, Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Paris. 
Irving S. Goldstein, Professor of Wood and Paper Science and Head of the 

Department. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Alan Gonzalez, Professor of Modem Languages and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Lemuel Goode, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Flordia. 
Guy Vernon Gooding, Jr., Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of California at Davis. 
Major M. Goodman, Associate Professor of Statistics and Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
James Howard Goodnight, Research Associate in Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Christopher R. Gould, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Perry Linwood Grady, Assistant Professor of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
William Lee Gragg, Associate Professor of Adult and Community College Educa- 
tion. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Louis A. Graham, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

M.Ch.E., University of Virg:inia. 
Robert William Graham, Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 



^ 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 295 



Larry Frank Grand, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology and Forestry. 

Ph.D., Washington State University. 
Arnold Herbert Edward Grandage, Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Josef Stefan Gratzl, Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., University of Vienna. 
Ralph Weller Greenlaw, Professor of History. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Walton Carlyle Gregory, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Crop Science and 

Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Daniel Swartwood Grosch, Professor of Genetics, Zoology and Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Harry Douglass Gross, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Thomas Hyman Guion, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Bhupender Singh Gupta, Associate Professor of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., Manchester College of Science and Technology. 
Edward Dewitt Gurley, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Frank Edwin Guthrie, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
George Richard Gwynn, Associate Professor (USD A) of Crop Science and Genetics 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Robert John Hader, Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
William Leroy Hafley, Associate Professor of Forestry and Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Francis Joseph Hale, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Robert Gordon Halfacre, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
George Lincoln Hall, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Max Halperen, Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
Donald Dale Hamann, Associate Professor of Food Science and Biological and 

Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Dame Scott Ham by, Burlington Industries Professor of Textile Technology and 

Director of Textiles Extension and Continuing Edu/;ation. 

B.S., Alabama Polytechnic Institute. 
Charles Horace Hamilton, William Neal Reynolds Professor Emeritus of Sociol- 
ogy and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Pat Brooks Hamilton, Professor of Poultry Science and Microbiology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
John Valentine Hamme, Associate Professor of Materials Engineering and Direc- 
tor of Cooperative Engineering Education. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Larry Keith Hammett, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Gordon A. Hammon, Associate Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. 

B.S., New York State College of Forestry. 



296 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Leigh Hugh Hammond, Extension Associate Professor of Economics and Assistant 

Vice-Chancellor for Extension and Public Service. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Kenneth William Hanck, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Arthur Paul Hansen, Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Donald Joseph Hansen, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Texas. 
DuRWiN Melford Hanson, Professor of Industrial and Technical Education and 

Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
James William Hanson, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

M.A., University of Michigan. 
Warren Durward Hanson, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
John J. Harder, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Dr.Ing., Technische Hochschule. 
James Walker Hardin, Professor of Botany and Forest Resources. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Harry Allen Hargrave, Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
Reinard Harkema, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Charles Wayne Harper, Jr., Assistant Professor of Education and History. 

Ed.D., University of Northern Colorado. 
Cleon Wallace Harrell, Jr., Associate Professor of Economics. 

M.A., University of Virginia. 
George Ouver Harrell, Associate Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Walter Joel Harrington, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Harwell Hamilton Harris, Professor Emeritus of Architecture. 
James Ray Harris, Extension Professor of Poultry Science. 

D.V.M., Auburn University. 
William Charles Harris, Associate Professor of History. 

Ph.D., University of Alabama. 
Clarence Arthur Hart, Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
FliANKLiN Delano Hart, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
LoDWiCK Charles Hartley, Professor Emeritus of English. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Robert Eduard Hartwig, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Adelaide. 
Paul Henry Harvey, William Neai Reynolds Professor of Crop Science and Gene- 
tics and Head of the Department of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Raymond W. Harvey, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Hassan Ahmed Hassan, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Francis Jefferson Hassler, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Biological and 

Agricultural Engineering and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Michigan State College. 
William Walton Hassler, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 297 



John Reid Hauser, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Kerry Shuford Havner, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 
Robert George Hayden, Visiting Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Edward Charles Hayes, III, Assistant Professor of Microbiology. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
Don William Hayne, Professor of Statistics and Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
FliANK Lloyd Haynes, Jr., Professor of Horticultural Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
William Joseph Head, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Allen Streeter Heagle, Assistant Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Teddy Theodore Hebert, Professor of Plant Pathology and Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Walter Webb Heck, Adjunct Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Clinton Loms Heimbach, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Warren Robert Henderson, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Forrest Clyde Hentz, Jr., Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
George Henry Hepting, Adjunct Professor of Plant Pathology and Forestry. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Solomon Philip Hersh, Charles A. Cannon Professor of Textiles and Graduate 

Administrator of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Randolph Thompson Hester, Jr., Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

M.L.A., Harvard University. 
Charles Horace Hill, Professor of Poultry Science and Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Frederic James Hill, Extension Assistant Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Thomas Ira Hines, Professor of Recreation Resources Administration and Head of 

the Department. 

M.A., University of North Carolina. 
Robert Grant Hitchings, Professor and In Charge of Pulp and Paper Technology. 

M.F., Duke University. 
George Burnham Hoadley, Professor of Electrical Engineering and Head of the 

Department. 

D.Sc, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
John Eyres Hobbie, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Indiana University. 
Joseph Patrick Hobbs, Associate Professor of History. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Charles Sasn:-' ^-. Hodges, Jr., Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology and Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Ernest Hodgson, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Oregon State University. 
Harold Douglas Holder, Visiting Associate Professor of Sociology and 

Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Syracuse University. 



298 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Daniel Lester Holley, Jr., Assistant Professor of Forestry and Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert Griffen Holmes, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Abraham Holtzman, Professor of Politics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Thomas Lynn Honeycutt, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Dale Max Hoover, Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Maurice William Hoover, Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Harold Bruce Hopfenberg, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
William Ernest Hopke, Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services and Head 

of the Department. 

Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University. 
Yasuyuki Horie, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., Washington State University. 
John William Horn, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M.S.C.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Horace Robert Horton, Professor of Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
David Hewes Howells, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering and 

Director of the Water Resources Research Institute. 

M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Barney Kuo-Yen Huang, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
NoRDEN Eh Huang, Associate Professor of Oceanography. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Z Zimmerman Hugus, Jr., Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Melvin Theodore Huish, Associate Professor (USDI) of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Donald Huisingh, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Frank James Humenik, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engi- 
neering and Associate Head of the Department of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering in Charge of Eoctension. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Ervin Grigg Humphries, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering and Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
James Ernest Huneycutt, Jr., Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Arvel Hatch Hunter, Visiting Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Gene Raymond Huntsman, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
John Calvin Hurt, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
George Hyatt, Jr., Professor of Animal Science, Associate Dean of Agriculture and 

Life Sciences and Director of Agricultural Extension Service. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
David Neil H yman. Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 299 



LoREN Albert Ihnen, Profensotr of Economics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
John E. Ikerd, Extension Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
George David Irwin, Professor (USDA) of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Stanley Dean Ivie, Associate Professor of Ediocation. 

Ed.D., George Peabody College. 
William Addison Jackson, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Alvin Wilkins Jenkins, Jr., Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Samuel Forest Jenkins, Jr., Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Bobby Ray Johnson, Assistant Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 
Bryan Hugh Johnson, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 
Franklin M. Johnson, Assistant Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Texas. 
Charles Edward Johnson, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
Joseph Clyde Johnson, Professor of Psychology. 

Ed.D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 
Norman Elden Johnson, Adjunct Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Paul Reynolds Johnson, Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
William Hugh Johnson, Professor of Biological and Agrictdtural Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
William L. Johnson, Assistant Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Charles Parker Jones, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Edgar Walton Jones, Associate Professor of Economics and Associate Vice Presi- 
dent for Research and Public Service Programs of the University of North 

Carolina. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Evan Earl Jones, Associate Professor of Animal Science and Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Guy Langston Jones, Professor of Crop Science and Soil Science and In Charge 

Agronom,y Extension. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Ivan Dunlavy Jones, Professor Emeritus of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
James Robert Jones, Extension Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Lawrence Keith Jones, Assistant Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
Louis Allman Jones, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 
Victor Alan Jones, Associate Professor of Food Science and Biological and 

Agricultural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Joseph Stephan Kahn, Professor of Botany and Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 



300 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Amin M. Kamal, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., Nottingham University. 
Henry Leveke Kamphoefner, Professor Emeritus of Architecture and Dean Emeri- 
tus of the School of Design. 

M.S. Columbia University. 
Eugene John Kamprath, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Abdel-Aziz Ismail Kashef, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Gerald Howard Katzin, Associate Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
James F. Kauffman, Assistant Professor of Electrical. Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Harvey G. Kebschull, Associate Professor of Politics. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Kenneth Raymond Keller, Professor of Crop Science and Assistant Director of 

Research, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Robert Clay Kellison, Assistant Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Harry Charles Kelly, Professor of Physics and Vice Chancellor and Provost. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Myron William Kelly, Assistant Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Henderson Grady Kincheloe, Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Doris Euzabeth King, Professor of History. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Richard Adams King, M.G. Mann Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
James Bryant Kirkland, Professor Emeritus of Edu/sation and Dean Emeritus of 

the School of Education. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Wesley Edwin Kloos, Associate Professor of Genetics and Microbiology . 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
David Raymond Kniefel, Assistant Professor of Education. 

Ed.D., New Mexico State University. 
Kenneth Lee Knight, Professor of Entomology and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Richard Bennett Knight, L. L. Vaughan Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

M.S., University of Illinois. 
James Arthur Knopp, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Albert Sidney Knowles, Professor of English. 

M.A., University of Virginia. 
Charles Ernest Knowt^es, Assistant Professor ofGeosciences. 

Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 
Peter Koch, Adjunct Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 
Jerome William Koenigs, Adjunct Associate Professor of Forestry and Plant 

Pathology. 

Ph.D., Washington State University. 
Kwangil Koh, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
John Ronald Kolb, Associate Professor of Mathematics and Mathematics Educa- 
tion. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 301 



Thomas Rhinehart Konsler, AaaociateProfesaor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Benjamin Granade Koonce, Jr., Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
William Wurth Kriegel, Professor Emeritus of Materials Engineering. 

Dr.Ing., Technische Hochschule. 
Knut Paul Kringstad, Adjunct Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Dr. Revnat., Technical University. 
George James Kriz, Professor of Biological and Argricultural Engineering and 

Assistant Director of Research for the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Arnold Krochmal, Professor (USPS) of Botany. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Elmer George Kuhlman, Adjunct Associate Professor of Plant Pathology and 

Forestry. 

Ph.D., Oregon State University. 
Leaton John Kushman, Professor (USDA) of Horticultural Science. 

M.S., George Washington University. 
Fred Lado, Jr., Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
John Ralph Lambert, Jr., Professor of University Studies. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Joe Oscar Lammi, Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Forrest Wesley Lancaster, Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Chester Grey Landes, Associate Professor Emeritus of Wood and Paper Science. 

B.S.Ch.E., Ohio State University. 
Leonard Jay Langfelder, Professor of Civil Engineering and Director of Center for 

Marine and Coastal Studies. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Roy Axel Larson, Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
RoLLiN Amos Lasseter, III, Assistant Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
Charles James Law, Jr., Adjunct Assistant Professor of Adult and Community 

College Edujcation. 

Ed.D., Duke University. 
James Murray Leatherwood, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
James Giacomo Lecce, Professor of Animal Science and Microbiology. 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Douglas Harry Kedgwin Lee, Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

D.T.M., University of Sydney. 
Joshua Alexander Lee, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of California at Davis. 
James Edward Legates, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Animal Science and 

Genetics and Dean of the School of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Carlton James Leith, Professor of Geosciences and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Kurt John Leonard, Associate Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Thomas Earl LeVere, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Michael Phillip Levi, Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science and Plant 

Pathology and Extension Wood Products Specialist. 

Ph.D., Leeds University. 



302 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Jack Levine, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Samuel Gale Levine, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Charles Sanford Levings, III, Professor ofGenetixis. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Charles Edward Lewis, Extension Assistant Professor of Sociology and 

Anthropology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Paul Edwin Lewis, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
William Mason Lewis, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
David Alan Link, Professor of Computer Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Ardell Chester Linnerud, Assistant Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Michael Anthony Littlejohn, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Charles Dwayne Livengood, Assistant Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert Warren Llewellyn, Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

M.S. I.E., Purdue University. 
Richard Henry Loeppert, Professor of Chemistry and Assistant to the Department 

Head. 

Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 
George Gilbert l,ong, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Raymond Carl Long, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Ian Stewart Longmuir, Professor of Biochemistry. 

M.B.B., St. Bartholomew's Medical School. 
Peter Reeves Lord, Professor of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., University of London. 
Joseph William Love, Extension Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Richard Lawrence Lower, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
George Blanchard Lucas, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
Henry Lawrence Lucas, Jr., William Neal Reynolds Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Leon Thomas Lucas, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of California at Davis. 
James Emory Robinson Luginbuhl, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Jiang Luh, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Dan Barry Lumsden, Visiting Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
James Fulton Lutz, Professor Emeritus of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
Walter Kenneth Lynch, Associate Professor of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., Leeds University. 
Joseph Thomas Lynn, Professor of Physics, Graduate Administrator and Assistant 

to the Department Head. 

M.S., Ohio State University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 303 



Charles F. Lytle, Professor of Zoology and Teaching Coordinator in the 

Biological Sciences. 

Ph.D., Indiana University. 
Jerry Lee Machemehl, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 
Clarence Joseph Maday, Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
James Gray Maddox, Professor Emeritus of Economics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Michael Jay Magazine, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
John William Magill, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
James Kitchener Magor, Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Alexander Russell Main, Professor of Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., Cambridge University. 
Charles Edw^ard Main, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Charles Michael Mainland, Extension Associate Professor of Horticultural 

Science. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
T. EwALD Maki, Carl Alivin Schenck Professor of Forestry. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Heinrich Valdemar Malling, Adjunct Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Copenhagen. 
Fred Allen Mangum, Jr., Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Carroll Lamb Mann, Jr., Adjunct Professor of Civil Engineering. 

C.E., Princeton University. 
Thurston Jefferson Mann, Professor of Crop Science and Genetics and Head of 

the Department of Genetics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Charles Richard Manning, Jr., Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Edward George Manning, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Edward Raymond Manring, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Allison Ray Manson, Associate Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Herman F. Mark, Adjunct Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Vienna. 
William Paul Marley, Assistant Professor of Physical Education. 

Ph.D., University of Toledo. 
Joe Alton Marlin, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Culpepper Paul Marsh, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
David Boyd Marsland, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Clifford K. Martin, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
David Hamilton Martin, Associate Professor of Physics. 

M.S., University of Wisconsin. 
Donald Crowell Martin, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 



304 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



LeRoy Brown Martin, Jr., Professor of Computer Science and Director of the 

Computing Center and Assistant Provost for University Computing. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Robert H. Martin, Jr., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology. 
Bernard Stephen Martof, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
David Dickenson Mason, Professor of Statistics and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Don Alan Masterton, Associate Professor of Product Design. 

M.S., Illinois Insitute of Technology. 
Gene Arthur Mathia, Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Gennard Matrone, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Biochemistry and Animal 

Science and Head of the Department of Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Neely Forsyth Jones Matthews, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Dale Frederick Matzinger, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
William Maxwell, Jr., Associate Professor of Education and Assistant Dean. 

Ed.D., Harvard University. 
George Mayer, Adjunct Associate Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Selz Cabot Mayo, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology and Head of the 

Department. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Warren Lee McCabe, R. J. Reynolds Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engi- 
neering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Glenn Crocker McCann, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology and Graduate 

Administrator. 

Ph.D., Washington State College. 
Charles Bernard McCants, Professor of Soil Science and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Jackson Mearns McClain, Associate Professor of Politics. 

Ph.D., University of Alabama. 
William Fred McClure, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert Edmund McCollum, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Kathleen Anderton McCutchen, Instructor in the School of Education. 

M.A., Columbia University. 
Benjamin Thomas McDaniel, Professor of Animal Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Patrick Hill McDonald, Jr., Harrelson Professor of Engineering Mechanics and 

Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Ralph McGregor, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry and Graduate 

Administrator in Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Leeds University. 
William Alexander McIntosh, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Industrial and 

Technical Education. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
William Thomas McKean, Jr., Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 305 



Wendell Herbert McKenzie, Assistant Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Claude Eugene McKinney, Professor of Design and Dean of the School. 

B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
John Joseph McNeill, Associate Professor of Animal Science and Microbiology. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Donald Irkerd McRee, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Francis Edward McVay, Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Julie Gegner McVay, Assistant Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
Jefferson Sullivan Meares, Professor Emeritus of Physics. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Gerhard K. Megla, Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Dresden. 
Jasper Durham Memory, Professor of Physics and Associate Dean, School of 

Physical and M athematical Sciences. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Arthur Clayton Menius, Jr., Professor of Physics and Dean of the School of 

Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Charles Venable Mercer, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Donald Hartland Mershon, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., University of California, 
Law^rence Eugene Mettler, Professor of Genetics and Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Texas. 
Louis John Metz, Adjunct Professor of Forestry and Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Carl Dean Meyer, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Colorado State University. 
Walter Earl Meyers, Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Gordon Kennedy Middleton, Professor Emeritus of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Marion LAWTiENCE Miles, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Robert Donald Milholland, Associate Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Conrad Henry Miller, Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Grover Cleveland Miller, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
How^ard George Miller, Professor of Psychology and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Latham Lee Miller, Associate Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. 

M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Philip Arthut? Miller, Professor of Crop Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Texton Robert Miller, Associate Professor of Agricultural Education and 

Graduate Administrator. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
William Dykstra Miller, Professor Emeritus of Forestry. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
Jehangir Farhad Mirza, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 



306 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Walter Joseph Mistric, Jr., Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Texas A&M University. 
Adolphus Mitchell, Professor Emeritus of Engineering Mechanics. 

M.S. C.E., University of North Carolina. 
Gary Earl Mitchell, Associate Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
Theodore Bertis Mitchell, Professor Emerittis of Entomology. 

D.S., Harvard University. 
Thornton W. Mitchell, Adjunct Associate Professor of History. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Khosrow Lolis Moazed, Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 
Richard Douglas Mochrie, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Mansolti H. M. Mohamed, Associate Professor of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., Manchester College of Science and Technology. 
Robert Harry Moll, Professor of Genetics and Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Thomas Joseph Monaco, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Daniel James Moncol, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

D.V.M., University of Georgia. 
Robert James Monroe, Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Larry King Monteith, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Clifford James Moore, Jr., Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Southern Methodist University. 
Frank Harper Moore, Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Harry Ballard Moore, Jr., Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert Parker Moore, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Charles Galloway Morehead, Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services. 

Ed.D., University of Kansas. 
Charles Glen Moreland, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Donald Edwin Moreland, Professor (USD A) of Crop Science, Botany and Forestry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert Leroy Morgan, Research Associate in the Center for Occupational 

Education. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Marvin Kent Moss, Associate Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Ralph Lionel Mott, Research Associate in Botany. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Robert Lonnie Moxley, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Terumi Mlkai, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Wesley Grigg Mlxlen, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
James Colvin Mulligan, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Tulane University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 307 



Charles Franklin Murphy, Associate Professor of Crop Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Raymond LeRoy Mltiray, Burlington Professor of Physics and Head of the 

Department of Nuclear Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 
Kenneth Earl Muse, Assistant Professor of Zoology and Coordinator Electron 

Microscope Center. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert David Mustian, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
Richard Monier Myers, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

M.S., Pennsylvania State University. 
Howard Movess Nahikian, Professor of Mathematics and Assistant to Department 

Head. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Gene Namkoong, Professor (USPS) of Genetics and Forestry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Lawrence Alan Nelson, Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Paul Victor Nelson, Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Joseph Taft Nerden, Professor of Industrial and Technical Education. 

Ph.D., Yale University. 
William Belton Nesbitt, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
Herbert Henry Neunzig, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Slater Edmund Newman, Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Thomas Everett Nichols, Jr., Extension Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Paul Adrian Nickel, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles. 
Gifford Spruce Nickerson, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Lowell Wendell Nielsen, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Inder Pal Nijhawan, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Stuart McGuire Noblin, Professor of History. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Glenn Ray Noggle, Professor of Botany and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Bruce Augustus Norton, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Charles Joseph Nusbaum, William Neai Reynolds Professor Emeritus of Plant 

Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Henry Lee Wiluamson Nuttle, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Bernard Martin Olsen, Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Delmar Walter Olson, Professor of Industrial and Technical Eduxsation and 

Coordinator for Industrial Arts. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
John Benjamin O'Neal, Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 



308 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Ronald William Oppenheim, Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Washingfton University. 
Michael Ray Overcash, Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering and Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Guy Owen, Jr., Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Mehmet Necati Ozisik, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of London. 
Lavon Barry Page, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Hayne Palmour, in, Professor of Materials Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Chia-Ven Pao, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
Garland Burnis Pardue, Assistant Professor (USDI) of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Auburn University. 
Hubert Vern Park, Professor of Mathematics and Associate Department Head. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Jae Young Park, Associate Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Charles Alexander Parker, Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
George William Parker, III, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 
John Mason Parker, III, Professor Emeritus ofGeosciences. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Barbara Mitchell Parramore, Assistant Professor in the Division of Education. 

Ed.D., Duke University. 
Gerald E. Parsons, Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College Education 

and State Leader of Training. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Mary Paschal, Associate Professor of Modem Languages and Assistant Depart- 
ment Head. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Ernest Caleb Pasour, Jr., Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Yale Nance Patt, Associate Professor of Computer Science. 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 
Harold Edward Pattee, Associate Professor (USD A) of Botany. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Robert Preston Patterson, Associate Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Richard Roland Patty, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Richard Gustave Pearson, Professor of Psychology and Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 
Ronald Gray Pearson, Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., University of Melbourne. 
Ralph James Peeler, Jr., Associate Professor of Economics, Coordinator of 

Graduate Programs in Economics and Assistant Dean of the Graduate School. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
John Noble Perkins, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Ronald William Pero, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Rhode Island. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 309 



Richard Kidd Perrin, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Jerome John Perry, Professor of Microbiology . 

Ph.D., University of Texas. 
Thomas Oliver Perry, Professor of Forestry, Genetics and Landscape Architecture. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Keith Stuart Petersen, Associate Professor of Politics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
James Teigen Peterson, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Meteorology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Walter John Peterson, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Chemistry and Dean 

of the Graduate School. 

Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
Wilbur Carroll Peterson, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
David Mason Pharr, Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Joseph Allen Phillips, Extension Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Lyle Llewellyn Phillips, Professor of Crop Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Washingfton. 
Leonard Joseph Pietrafesa, Assistant Professor of Oceanography . 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 
Julius Carl Poindexter, Jr., Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
George Waverly Poland, Professor of Modem Languages. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Daniel Townsend Pope, Research Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Joe Allen Porter, Visiting Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

M.L.A., University of Illinois. 
Joseph Alexander Porter, Jr., Professor of Textile Technology. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Ira Deward Porterfield, Professor of Animal Science and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
DiLLARD Martin Powell, Assistant Professor of Textile Technology. 

J.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Nathaniel Thomas Powell, Professor of Plant Pathology and Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Anco Luning Prak, James T. Ryan Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Richard Joseph Preston, Professor Emeritus of Forestry and Dean Emeritus of the 

School of Forest Resources. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Walter Ray Prince, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Charles Harry Proctor, Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Charles Ray Pugh, Extension Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Albert Ernest Purcell, Professor (USDA) of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Thomas Lavelle Quay, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Charles Price Quesenberry, Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 



310 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Robert Lamar Rabb, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Allen Huff Rakes, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Robert Todd Ramsay, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Miami. 
Harold Arch Ramsey, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Charles David Rarer, Jr., Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
John Oren Rawungs, Professor of Statistics and Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Horace Darr Rawls, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Rachel F. Rawls, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Bibekananda Ray, Visiting Assistant Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Paul Herman Ray, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Microbiology. 

Ph.D., Indiana University. 
Isaac Epps Ready, Visiting Professor of Adtdt and Community College Education. 

Ed.D., New York University. 
Ralph Heath Reeves, Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

Ph.D., Institute of Paper Chemistry. 
Thomas Howard Regan, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Willis Alton Reid, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Richard Allyn Reinert, Associate Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
GuNTHER John Phillip Reuer, Associate Professor of Architecture. 

Ph.D., Frei University. 
Michael Shane Reynolds, Assistant Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Donald Robert Rhodes, University Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Theodore Roosevelt Rice, Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Frances Marian Richardson, Research Associate Professor of Engineering 

Research. 

M.S., University of Cincinnati. 
William Lawrence Rickards, III, Visiting Assistant Professor of Zoology and 

Assistant Director, N.C. Sea Grant Program. 

Ph.D., University of Miami. 
John Marion Riddle, Associate Professor of History. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Don Lee Ridgeway, Professor of Statistics and Physics. 

Ph.D., University of Rochester. 
Jackson Ashcraft Rigney, Professor of Statistics and Dean for International 

Programs. 

M.S., Iowa State College. 
Woodrow Ernest Robbins, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Ph.D., Syracuse University. 
John Frederick Roberts, Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Arizona. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 311 



William Garner Roberts, Jr., Visiting Associate Professor of Environmental 

Design and Associate Director of Urban Affairs and Community Service Center 

M.R.P., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
William Milner Roberts, Professor of Food Science and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Robert LaFon Robertson, Extension Professor of Entomology. 

M.S., Auburn University. 
Mendel Leon Robinson, Jr., Assistant Professor of Textile Technology and 

Academic Coordinator for the School of Textiles. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
Odis Wayne Robison, Associate Professor of Animal Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Theodore George Rochow, Associate Professor of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
George Calvert Rock, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Charles Herman Rogers, Adjunct Associate Professor of Agricultural Edujcatiom. 

Ed.D., Cornell University. 
Roger Phillip Rohrbach, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Ernest William Rollins, Associate Professor of Modem Languages. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
Nicholas John Rose, Professor of Mathematics and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., New York University. 
John Paul Ross, Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
John Arthur Roulier, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Ph.D., Syracuse University. 
Thelma Louise Roundtree, Adjunct Professor of Education. 

Ph.D., Emory University. 
Ronald W. Rousseau, Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Louisiana State University. 
Hobart Gilbert Rouall, Jr., Adjunct Associate Professor of Education. 

M.A., Appalachian State University. 
Larry Herbert Royster, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Louise May Russell, Adjunct Professor of Entomology. 

M.S., Cornell University. 
Paul James Rust, Associate Professor of Eduxiation. 

Ph.D., University of Washington. 
Henry Ames Rutherford, Cone Mills Professor of Textile Chemistry and Head of 

the Department. 

M.S., George Washington University. 
Curtis W. Sabrosky, Adjunct Professor of Entomology. 

M.S., Kansas State University. 
Ronald Herbert Sack, Assistant Professor of History. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Hans Sagan, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Vienna. 
Edward Aaron Saibel, Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Pedro A. Sanchez, Associate Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 



312 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Douglas Charles Sanders, Extension Assistant Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Henry Sanoff, Associate Professor of Architecture. 

M.Arch., Pratt Institute. 
Frank Dorrance Sargent, Extension Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Joseph Neal Sasser, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
Walter Joseph Saucier, Professor of Meteorology. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Man Mohan Sawhney, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Indian Agricultural Research Institute. 
Richard L. Saw^yer, Adjunct Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Raymond Frederick Saxe, Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Liverpool. 
LeRoy Charles Saylor, Professor of Genetics and Forestry and Assistant Dean of 

the School of Forest Resources. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Clarence Cayce Scarborough, Professor Emeritus of Agricultural Education. 

Ed.D., University of Illinois. 
Henry Elkin Schaffer, Associate Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Jan Frederick Schetzina, Assistant Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Howard A. Schneider, Professor of Nutrition and Director of the Institute of 

Nutrition. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Edw^ard Martin Schoenborn, Jr., Charles H. Herty Professor of Chemical 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
John William Schrader, Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Anton Franz Schreiner, Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Ronald Arthur Schrimper, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Herbert Temple Scofield, Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Lewis Worth Seagondollar, Professor of Physics and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
James Arthur Seagraves, Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
John Frank Seely, Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

M.Ch.E., North Carolina State University. 
Kenyon Bertel Segner, III, Assistant Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. 

Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Heinz Seltmann, Associate Professor (USDA) of Botany. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Ernest Davis Seneca, Assistant Professor of Botany and Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Henry Anthony Shannon, Associate Professor of Science Education. 

Ed.M., University of Missouri. 
George Gerald Shaw, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 313 



Morton Russell Shaw, Professor of Textile Technology and Assistant Dean for 

Textile Research. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Samuel David Shearer, Jr., Adjunct Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Ronald Wilson Sharon, Associate Professor of Adult and Community College 

Education. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
Thomas Jackson Sheets, Professor of Entomology, Crop Science and Horticultural 

Science. 

Ph.D., University of California at Davis. 
Vernon Frederick Shogren, Associate Professor of Architecture. 

M.Arch., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Mollie Wiggins Shook, Research Associate, Center for Occupational Edu/;ation. 

Ed.D., Duke University. 
Thomas Clinard Shore, Jr., Assistant Professor of Industrial and Technical 

Education. 

Ed.D., University of Maryland. 
Douglas Dean Short, Assistant Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Richard C. Shumway, Assistant Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of California at Davis. 
Charles Edward Siewert, Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Robert Silber, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Clemson University. 
Donald Click Simmons, Assistant Professor of Poultry Science and Graduate 

Administrator. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Richard Lee Simmons, Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Edward Carroll Sisler, Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Crop Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Richard W. Skaggs, Assistant Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

and Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Walter Arthur Skroch, Extension Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Charles Small wood, Jr., Professor of Civil Engineering. 

M.S., Harvard University. 
Frederick Otto Smetana, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Southern California. 
Benjamin Warfield Smith, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Clyde Fuhriman Smith, Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Donald E. Smith, Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Farmer Sterling Smith, Assistant Professor of Industrial and Technical Education. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
Frank Houston Smith, Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Frank James Smith, Assistant Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
George Louis Smith, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 



314 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Henry Brower Smith, Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate Dean for 

Research andGraduate Studies, School of Engineering . 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati. 
J. C. Smith, Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
James Roy Smith, Adjunct Associate Professor of Oceanography. 

M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Thomas Edward Smith, Assistant Professor of Engineering Mechanics. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
William A. Smith, Jr., Professor of Industrial Engineering and Head of the 

Department. 

Eng.Sc.D., New York University. 
William Edward Smith, Professor of Recreation Resources Administration. 

Ed.D., George Peabody College. 
Fred David Sobering, Extension Professor of Economics and Specialist In Charge, 

Extension Economics. 

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 
Stanley Milton Soliday, Associate Professor of Industrial Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Arnold M. Sookne, Adjunct Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

M.S., George Washington University. 
Charles Duane Sopher, Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Kenneth Alan Sorensen, Extension Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., Kansas State University. 
Furman Yates Sorrell, Jr., Associate Professor of Engineering Mechanics and 

Graduate Administrator. 

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology. 
Robert Seago Sowell, Assistant Professor of Biological and Agrictdtural Engi- 
neering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Jason Loy Sox, Jr., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Marvin Luther Speck, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Food Science and 

Microbiology and Graduate Administrator in Food Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Herbert Elvin Speece, Professor of Mathematics and Mathematics Edux:ation and 

Head of the Department of Mathematics and Science Education. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
William Henry Spence, Associate Professor ofGeosciences. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
John D. Spragins, Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 
Harvey Wesley Spurr, Jr., Associate Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Edward M. Stack, Professor of Modem Languages. 

Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Hans Heinrich Stadelmaier, Research Professor of Metallurgy in Engineering 

Research. 

Dr.rer.nat., T. H. Stuttgart. 
Edward Paul Stahel, Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Ephraim St am. Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Alfred J. Stamm, Reuben B. Robertson Professor Emeritus of Wood and Paper 

Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 315 



Vivian Thomas Stannett, Camille Dreyfus Professor of Chemical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. 
John Staudhammer, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles. 
Robert George Douglas Steel, Professor of Statistics and Graduate Administrator. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Donald Henry John Steensen, Associate Professor of Forestry and Wood and 

Paper Science. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Darrell John Steffensmeier, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of Iowa. 
Allen Frederick Stein, Associate Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Stanley George Stephens, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., Edinburgh University. 
Robert Elmer Sternloff, Associate Professor of Recreation Resources 

Administration. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Robert K. Stevens, Adjunct Associate Professor of Wood and Paper Science. 

M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
William Damon Stevenson, Jr., Professor of Electrical Engineering, Associate 

Head of the Department and Graduate Administrator. 

M.S., University of Michigan. 
Hamilton Arlo Stewart, Professor Emeritus of Animal Science. 

Ph.D.. University of Minnesota. 
Ronald Edwin Stinner, Visiting Assistant Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Ernest Lester Stitzinger, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
Robert Franklin Stoops, Research Professor of Materials Engineering and 

Director of Engineering Research Services Division. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
David Lewis Strider, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Raymond William Stroh, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. 
Raimond Aldrich Struble, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 
Duncan Robert Stuart, Professor of Design. 
Charles William Stuber, Associate Professor (USDA) of Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
William Cufton Stuckey, Jr., Associate Professor of Textile Technology. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Charles Wilson Suggs, Professor of Biological and Agricultural Bhigineering . 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
James Edward Sunderland, Adjunct Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Joseph Gwyn Sutherland, Professor (USDA) of Economics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Paux Porter Sutton, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Elizabeth Manny Suval, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Stanley S. Suval, Associate Professor of History. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 



316 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Harold Everett Swaisgood, Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Ernst Warner Sw^anson, Professor Emeritus of Economics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Benee Frank Swindel, Associate Professor (USPS) of Forestry and Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Edith Dudley Sylla, Assistant Professor of History. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Richard Eugene Sylla, Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Banks Cooper Talley, Jr., Associate Professor of Guidance and Personnel Services 

and Dean of Student Affairs. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Fred Russell Tarver, Jr., Extension Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
David Lee Terry, Extension Assistant Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Cecil Fred Tester, Assistant Professor (USD A) of Crap Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Alan Lee Tharp, Assistant Professor of Computer Science. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
James Paul Thaxton, Associate Professor of Poultry Science. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Gordon Wallace Thayer, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Elizabeth C. Theil, Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Michael Herbert Theil, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn. 
F^ANK Bancroft Thomas, Extension Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Llewellyn Hilleth Thomas, Visiting University Professor of Physics. 

D.Sc, Cambridge University. 
Richard Joseph Thomas, Professor of Wood and Paper Science and Botany. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Donald Loraine Thompson, Professor (USDA) of Crop Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Edwin Gilbert Thurlow, Professor of Landscape Architecture. 

M.L.A., Harvard University. 
David Ronald Tilley, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 
Robert O. Tilman, Professor of Politics and Dean of the School of Liberal Arts. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
David Harry Timothy, Professor of Crop Science, Botany and Genetics. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Frederick Joseph Tischer, Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Prague. 
William Bell Toole, III, Professor of English and Associate Dean of Liberal Arts. 

Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. 
William Douglas Toussaint, Professor of Economics and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Iowa State College. 
Samuel B. Tove, Professor of Animal Science and Biochemistry. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Curtis Trent, Professor of Adult and Community College Education and State 

Leader of Training. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 317 



Anastasios Christos Triantaphyllou, Professor of Genetics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Hedwig Hirschmann Triantaphyllou, Professor of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Erlangen, Germany. 
James Richard Trover, Professor of Botany. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Harry Tucker, Jr., Associate Professor of Modem Languages. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Paul Arthur Tucker, Jr., Assistant Professor of Textile Technology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
William Preston Tucker, Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and 

Director of Graduate Studies in Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Jerry J. Tulis, Adjunct Associate Professor of Microbiology . 

Ph.D., Catholic University. 
Chi Choa Tung, Associate Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Carl Byron Turner, Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Lester Curtiss Ulberg, Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
David Frederick Ullrich, Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 
Claude Richard Unrath, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Mehmet Ensar Uyanik, Professor of Civil Engineering. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Odell Uzzell, Associate Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
John G. Vandenbergh, Adjunct Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Hubertus Robert van der Vaart, Professor of Statistics and Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Leiden University. 
Albert Donald Vande Veer, Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Religion. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Cecil Gerald Van Dyke, Assistant Professor of Botany and Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
KuRUViLLA Verghese, Associate Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
Maurice Earl Voland, Extension Associate Professor of Sociology and 

Anthropology. 

Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Richard James Volk, Professm- of Soil Science and Hortictdtural Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
George Henry Wahl, Jr., Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., New York University. 
Harvey Edward Wahls, Professor of Civil Engineering and Graduate 

Administrator. 

Ph.D., Northwestern University. 
Jay Townsend Wakeley, Adjunct Professor of Statistics. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
James Lester Walker, Visiting Associate Professor (AID) of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., University of Hawaii. 
Monroe Eliot Wall, Adjunct Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
James Clarence Wallace, Professor of University Studies. 

M.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 



318 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Thomas Dudley Wallace, Professor of Economics and Statistics. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
William Hall Wallace, Professor of Economics and Assistant Department Head 

for Management ( Business). 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Richard Gaither Walser, Professor Emeritus of English. 

M.A., University of North Carolina. 
William Kershaw Walsh, Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
William Mood Walter, Jr., Associate Professor (USDA) of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Thomas Noble Walters, Associate Professor of English and Education. 

Ed.D., Duke University. 
Arthur Walter Waltner, Professor of Physics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Thomas Marsh Ward, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Frederick Gail Warren, Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State College. 
M arlin Roger Warren, Jr., Associate Professor of Recreation Resources 

Administration. 

Dr.Rec, University of Indiana. 
John Louis Wasik, Associate Professor of Statistics and Psychology. 

Ed.D., Florida State University. 
William Meade Waters, Jr., Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education and 

Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
Gerald Francis Watson, Assistant Professor of Meteorology. 

Ph.D., Florida State University. 
Larry Wayne Watson, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Education. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Donovan Lloyd Waugh, Visiting Associate Professor (AID) of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Neil Broyles Webb, Associate Professor of Food Science. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri. 
Allen Howard Weber, Associate Professor of Meteorology. 

Ph.D., University of Utah. 
Jerome Bernard Weber, Professor of Crop Science and Soil Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Sterling Barg Weed, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Gerald Thomas Weekman, Extension Professor of Entomology, In Charge 

Entomology Extension. 

Ph.D., Iowa State University. 
WiLLARD Wesley Weeks, Assistant Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 

Charles Wiluam Welby, Associate Professor ofGeosciences. 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Frederick Lovejoy Wellman, Professor Emeritus of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Bertram Whittier Wells, Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Carol Glenn Wells, Adjunct Professor of Soil Science and Forestry. m 



Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
J. C. Wells, Extension Professor of Plant Pathology 
M.S. A., University of Georgia. 



I 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 319 



Robert Charles Wells, Extension Associate Professor of Economics. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Ronald Earle Welty Associate Professor (USDA) of Plant Pathology. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Earl Allen Wernsman, Professor of Crop Science and Genetics. 

Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Dennis William Wertz, Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., University of South Carolina. 
Oscar Wesler, Professor of Statistics and Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Stanford University. 
Harry Carter West, Assistant Professor of English. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Bert Whitley Westbrook, Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ed.D., Florida State University. 
Joseph Arthur Weybrew, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Mary Euzabeth Wheeler, Associate Professor of History. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Thomas Burton Whitaker, Associate Professor (USDA) of Biological and Agricul- 
tural Engineering. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
EsTELLE Edwards White, Extension Assistant Professor of Adult and Community 

College Education. 

Ed.D., North Carolina State University. 
Raymond Cyrus White, Professor of Chemistry. 

Ph.D., West Virginia University. 
Robert Benjamin White, Jr., Professor of English and Assistant Head. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
John Kerr Whitfield, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
Larry Alston Whitford, Professor Emeritus of Botany. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
John Mallory Whitsett, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of Texas. 
Margaret Utley Wiebe, Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
John Clark Wilk, Associate Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Richard R. Wilkinson, Professor of Landscape Architecture and Forest Resources 

and Head of the Department of Landscape Architecture. 

M.L.A., University of Michigan. 
James Clifford Williams, III, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

and Associate Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., University of Southern California. 
James Oliver Williams, Associate Professor of Politics. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Mary Cameron Williams, Assistant Professor of English. 

Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 
Porter Williams, Jr., Professor of English. 

M.A., Cambridge University; University of Virginia. 
James Claude Williamson, Jr., Professor of Economics and Associate Dean and 

Director of Research, School of Agricidture and Life Sciences. 

M.S., North Carolina State University. 
Norman Francis Williamson, Jr., Assistant Professor of Computer Science and 

Acting H^ad of the Department. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 



320 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



Ronald Coleman Wimberley, Assistant Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee. 
James Blake Wilson, Associate Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., University of Florida. 
Nash Nicks Winstead, Professor of Plant Pathology and Associate Provost. 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Lowell Sheridan Winton, Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
George Herman Wise, William Neal Reynolds Professor of Animal Science. 

Ph.D., University of Minnesota. 
Edward Hempstead Wiser, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Bernard Wishy, Professor of History and Head of the Department. 

Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Peter Nicolas Witt, Adjunct Professor of Zoology. 

M.D., University of Tuebingen. 
Thomas G. Wolcott, Assistant Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., University of California. 
Douglas Arthur Wolfe, Adjunct Associate Professor of Zoology. 

Ph.D., Ohio State University. 
Arthur George Wollum, II, Associate Professor of Soil Science, Forestry and 

Microbiology. 

Ph.D., Oregon State University. 
William Garland Woltz, Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
James Woodburn, Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 

Dr. Engr., Johns Hopkins University. 
William Walton Woodhouse, Jr., Professor of Soil Science. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Robert Wyllie Work, Professor Emeritus of Textiles. 

Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Arch Douglas Worsham, Professor of Crop Science. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Jimmie Jack Wortman, Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., Duke University. 
Charles Gerald Wright, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Robert Takichi Yamamoto, Associate Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Edward Carson Yates, Jr., Adjunct Associate Professor of Mechanical and Aero- 
space Engineering. 

Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 
David Allen Young, Jr., Professor of Entomology. 

Ph.D., University of Kansas. 
James Herbert Young, Associate Professor of Biological and Agricultural Engi- 
neering. 

Ph.D., Oklahoma State University. 
James Neal Young, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology. 

Ph.D., University of Kentucky. 
Talmage Brian Yoing, Associate Professor of Industrial Arts Education. 

Ed.D., University of Florida. 
Mohamed Gamal Zaalouk, Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering. 

Ph.D., North Carolina State University. 
Donald C. Zeiger, Associate Professor of Horticultural Science. 

Ph.D., Rutgers University. 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 321 



Paul Zung-Teh Zia, Professor of Civil Engineering and Associate Head of the 
Department. 
Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Bruce J. Zobel, Edunn F. Conger Professor of Forestry and Genetics. 
Ph.D., University of California. 

Carl Frank Zorowski, R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. Professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering and Head of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. 
Ph.D., Carnegie Institute of Technology. 

Lloyd Robert Zumwalt, Professor of Nuclear Engineering. 
Ph.D., California Institute of Technology. 



322 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 

UNIVERSITY DISRUPTIONS 
POLICY AND PROCEDURES 

POLICIES, PROCEDURES, AND DISCIPLINARY ACTIONS IN CASES OF 
DISRUPTION OF THE EDUCATIONAL PROCESS 

The following statements concerning policies, procedures, and disciplinary actions 
in cases of disruption of the educational process were approved by the Trustees of 
the University of North Carolina and as such they remain in effect until modified by 
action by the Board of Governors of the new University system or by the Trustees of 
North Carolina State University. 

Section 1. Policies Relating to Disruptive Conduct 

The University of North Carolina has long honored the right of free discussion 
and expression, peaceful picketing and demonstrations, the right to petition and 
peaceably to assemble. That these rights are a part of the fabric of this institution is 
not questioned. They must remain secure. It is equally clear, however, that in a com- 
munity of learning willful disruption of the educational process, destruction of prop- 
erty, and interference with the rights of other members of the community cannot be 
tolerated. Accordingly, it shall be the policy of the University to deal with any 
such disruption, destruction or interference promptly and effectively, but also fairly 
and impartially without regard to race, religion, sex or political beliefs. 

Section 2. Definition of Disruptive Conduct 

(a) Any faculty member (the term "faculty member", wherever used in this policy 
shall include regular faculty members, full-time instructors, lecturers, and all other 
persons exempt from the North Carolina State Personnel System [Chapter 126 of 
the General Statutes as amended] who receive compensation for teaching, or other 
instructional functions, or research at the University), any graduate student 
engaged in the instructional program, or any student who, with the intent to ob- 
struct or disrupt any normal operation or function of the University or any of its 
component institutions, engages, or incites others to engage, in individual or collec- 
tive conduct which destroys or significantly damages any University property, or 
which impairs or threatens impairment of the physical well-being of any member of 
the University community, or which, because of its violent, forceful, threatening or 
intimidating nature or because it restrains fi-eedom of lawful movement, otherwise 
prevents any member of the University community from conducting his normal 
activities within the University, shall be subject to prompt, and appropriate discipli- 
nary action, which may include suspension, expulsion, discharge or dismissal from 
the University. 

The following, while not intended to be exclusive, illustrate the offenses encom- 
passed herein, when done for the purpose of obstructing or disrupting any normal 
operation or function of the University or any of its component institutions: (1) 
occupation of any University building or part thereof with intent to deprive others of 
its normal use; (2) blocking the entrance or exit of any University building or corri- 
dor or room therein with intent to deprive others of lawful access to or from, or use 
of, said building or corridor or room; (3) setting fire to or by any other means 
destroying or substantially damaging any University building or property, or the 
property of others on University premises; (4) any possession or display of, or 
attempt or threat to use, for any unlawful purpose, any weapon, dangerous instru- 
ment, explosive, or inflammable material in any University building or on any 
University campus; (5) prevention of, or attempt to prevent by physical act, the 
attending, convening, continuation or orderly conduct of any University class or 
activity or of any lawful meeting or assembly in any University building or on any 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 323 



University campus; and (6) blocking normal pedestrian or vehicular traffic on or 
into any University campus. 

(b) Any person engaged in the instructional program who fails or refuses to carry 
out validly assigned duties, with the intent to obstruct or disrupt any normal opera- 
tion or function of the University or any of its component institutions, shall be 
subject to prompt and appropriate disciplinary action under this policy if (but only 
if) his status is such that he is not subject to the provisions of Section 603 of Chap- 
ter VI of the Code of the University of North Carolina. 

Section 3. Responsibilities of Chancellors 

(a) When any Chancellor has cause to believe than any of the provisions of this 
policy have been violated, he shall forthwith investigate or cause to be investigated 
the occurrence, and upon identification of the parties involved shall promptly deter- 
mine whether any charge is to be made with respect thereto. 

(b) If he decides that a charge is to be made, he shall, within thirty (30) days 
after he has information as to the identity of the alleged perpetrator of the offense 
but in no event more than twelve (12) months after the occurrence of the alleged 
offense, (i) refer the case to the appropriate existing University judicial body, [See 
Faculty Hearing Committee in Chapter VIII below] or (ii) refer the matter to a 
Hearing Committee drawn from a previously selected Hearings Panel [See Hear- 
ings Panel in Chapter VIII below] which, under this option, is required to imple- 
ment action for violation of Section 2 (a) or (b) of this Chapter. If the case is 
referred to an existing University judicial body under (i) above, the procedural rules 
of that body shall be followed, and subsections (c) through (f) below shall not be 
applicable. If the matter is referred to a Hearing Committee under (ii) above, the 
procedural rules prescribed in subsections (c) through (f) below shall be followed. 

(c) The accused shall be given written notice by personal service or registered 
mail, return receipt requested, stating: 

(1) The specific violations of this policy with which the accused is charged. 

(2) The designated time and place of the hearing on the charge by the Hearing 
Committee, which time shall be not earlier than seven (7) nor later than ten (10) 
days following receipt of the notice. 

(3) That the accused shall be entitled to the presumption of innocence until found 
guilty, the right to retain counsel, the right to present the testimony of witnesses 
and other evidence, the right to cross-examine all witnesses against him, the right 
to examine all docvmients and demonstrative evidence adverse to him, and the 
right to a transcript of the proceedings of the hearing. 

(d) The Hearing (Committee shall determine the guilt or innocence of the accused. 
If the person charged is found guilty, the Hearing Committee shall recommend to 
the Chancellor such discipline as said body determines to be appropriate. After 
considering such recommendation the Chancellor shall prescribe such discipline as 
he deems proper. In any event, whether the person is found guilty or not guilty, a 
written report shall be made by the Chancellor to the President within ten (10) days. 

(e) Any person found guilty shall have ten (10) days after notice of such finding 
in which to appeal to the President of the University. Such an appeal if taken shall 
be upon the grounds set forth in Section 5. 

(f) Any accused person who, without good cause, shall fail to appear at the time 
and place fixed for the hearing of his case by the Hearing Committee shall be sus- 
pended indefinitely or discharged from University employment. 

(g) A Chancellor, unless so ordered or otherwise prevented by court, shall not be 
precluded from carrying out his duties under this policy by reason of any pending 
action in any State or Federal court. Should a delay occur in prosecuting the charge 
against the accused because the accused or witnesses that may be necessary to a 
determination of the charge are involved in State or Federal court actions, the time 
limitations set forth above in this Section 5-3 shall not apply. 

(h) Conviction in any State or Federal court shall not preclude the University or 



324 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



any of its officers from exercising disciplinary action in any offense referred to in 
this policy. 

(i) Nothing contained in this policy shall preclude the President or any Chancellor 
from taking any other steps, including injunctive relief or other legal action, which 
he may deem advisable to protect the best interests of the University. 

Section 4. Aggravated Acts or Threatened Repetition of Acts 

(a) The Chancellor of each of the component institutions of the University shall 
appoint an Emergency Consultative Panel which shall be composed of not less than 
three (3) nor more than five (5) faculty members and not less than three (3) nor 
more than five (5) students who shall be available to advise with the Chancellor in 
any emergency. No member of such Panel shall serve for more than one (1) year 
unless he be reappointed by the Chancellor. The Chancellor may make appointments, 
either temporary or for a f 1 year, to fill any vacancies which may exist on the 
Panel. 

(b) If, in the judgment c the Chancellor, there is clear and convincing evidence 
that a person has commirrd any of the acts prohibited under this policy which, 
because of the aggravatf;d character or probable repetition of such act or acts, 
necessitates immediate a> - n to protect the University from substantial interfer- 
ence with any of its orHerl> aerations or functions, or to prevent threats to or acts 
which endanger life oi p'-'per y, the Chancellor, with the concurrence as hereinafter 
provided of the Emer' ,ncy Lon:ultative Panel established pursuant to (a) above, 
may forthwith suspend such person from the University and bar him from the 
University campus; provided, however, that in the event of such suspension the 
person suspended shall be gi\en written notice of the reason for his suspension, 
either personally or by registered mail addressed to his last known address, and 
shall be afforded a prompt hearing, which, if requested, shall be commenced within 
ten (10) days of the suspension. Except for purposes of attending personally any 
hearings conducted under this policy, the bar against the appearance of the accused 
on the University campus shall remain in effect until final judgment has been ren- 
dered in his case and all appellant proceedings have been concluded, unless such 
restriction is earlier lifted by written notice from the Chancellor. 

(c) A quorum of the Emergency Consultative Panel provided for in (a) above 
shall consist of not less than four (4) of its members, and the required concurrence 
shall have been obtained if a majority of such quorum shall indicate their concvu-- 
rence. The Chancellor shall meet personally with members of such Panel at the time 
he seeks concurrence, if it is feasible to do so. However, if the circumstances are 
such that the Chancellor deems it not to be feasible to personally assemble such 
members, then he may communicate with them or the required number of them 
individually by telephone or by such other means as he may choose to employ, in 
which event he may proceed as provided in (b) above after the required majority of 
such members have communicated their concurrence to him. 

(d) In the Chancellor's absence or inability to act, the President may exercise 
the powers of the Chancellor specified in this Section 4 in the same manner and to 
the same extent as could the Chancellor but for such absence or inability to act. 

Section 5. Right of Appeal 

Any person found guilty of violating the provisions of this policy by the Hearing 
Committee referred to in Section 3 shall have the right to appeal the finding and the 
discipline imposed upon him to the President of the University. Any such appeal 
shall be in writing, shall be based solely upon the record, and shall be limited to one 
or more of the following grounds: 

(1) That the finding is not supported by substantial evidence; 

(2) That a fair hearing was not accorded the accused; or 

(3) That the discipline imposed was excessive or inappropriate. 



i 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 325 



It shall be the responsibility of the President to make prompt disposition of all such 
appeals, and his decision shall be rendered within thrity (30) days after receipt of 
the complete record on appeal. 

Section 6. No Amnesty 

No administrative official, faculty member, or student of the University shall 
have authority to grant amnesty or to make any promise as to prosecution or non- 
prosecution in any court, State or Federal, or before any student, faculty, adminis- 
trative, or Trustee committee to any person charged with or suspected of violating 
Section 5-2 (a) or (b) of these Bylaws. 

Section 7. Publication 

The provisions of this policy shall be given wide dissemination in such manner 
as the President or Chancellors may deem advisable, and shall be printed in the 
official catalogues which may be issued by each component institution of the Uni- 
versity. 



326 THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



INDEX 



Administration, 7 

Administration and Supervision, Educational, 117 

Admissions, 28-31; Full Graduate Standing, 29; 
Provisional Admission, 29-30; Unclassified 
Graduate Students, 30; Graduate-Certificate Re- 
newal, 30; Graduate-Special, 31 

Adult and Community College Education, 66-66 

Adult Learning Center, 22 

Agricultural Education, 115-116 

Air Conservation, 66-67 

Animal Science, 67-70 

Anthropology, see Sociology 

Application Fee, 34 

Architecture, 70-73 

Assistantships, 39 



B 



Biochemistry, 73-75 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering, 76-78 

Biological Sciences, 78-79 

Biology Field Laboratory, 22 

Biomathematics, 79-80 

Botany, 80-84 



Calendar, 8-14 

Cell Biology, 84 

Chemical Engineering, 84-89 

Chemistry, 89-93 

Civil Engineering, 93-100 

Computer Science, 100-102 

Computing Facilities, 22 

Crop Science, 103-106 

Curriculum and Instruction, 116 

Curriculum Materials Center, 18 



Design, 105-106 

Disruptions Policy and Procedures, 322-325 

Dissertation Requirement, Doctor of Philosophy 
Degree, 57 

Doctor of Education Degree, 57; Summary of Pro- 
cedures for the Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor 
of Education Degrrees, 69-61 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree, 64-59; Summary of 
Procedures for the Doctor of Philosophy and 
Doctor of Education Degrees, 69-61 



Ecology, 106-107 

Economics, 107-114 

Education, 114-134; Agricultural Education, 116- 
116; Curriculum and Instruction, 116; Ekluca- 
tional Administration and Supervision, 117; 
Guidance and Personnel Services, 117-118; In- 
dustrial and Technical Education, 118-119; In- 
dustrial Arts Education, 119-120; Mathematics 
and Science Education, 120-121; Occupational 
Education, 121-122; Special Education, 122; 
Education Courses, 122-134. Also see Adult and 
Conununity College Education, 65-66, and Psy- 
chology, 234-240 



Electrical Engineering. 134-139 

Electron Microscope Center, 23 

Engineering Mechanics, 139-143 

En^ish, 143-146 

Entomology, 146-149 

Examination Requirements, Master of Science and 
Master of Arts Degree, 49; Doctor of Philoso- 
phy, 57-59 



Faculty, Graduate, 283-321 
Fees, see Tuition and Fees 
Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships, 39-40; 

Fellowships, 39; Assistantships, 39-40 
Fiber and Polymer Science. 149-151 
Fields of Instruction, 64-280 
Financial Aid, 40-41; National Direct Student 

Loans, 40-41; Part-time Jobs, 41; Short-Term 

Emergency Loans, 41 
Food Science, 151-153 
Food Services, 44 
Forestry, 153-156 



General Information, 28-44; Admissions, 28-31; 
Registration, 31-33; Tuition and Fees, 34-38; 
Fellowships and Graduate Assistantships, 39- 
40; Other Financial Aid, 40-41; Military Educa- 
tion and Training, 41-42; Housing, 42-44 

Genetics, 166-159 

Geology, 160-162 

Geosciences, 162-163 

Governors, Board of, UNC, 281-282 

Graduate Degrees, 45-61; Master of Science and 
Master of Arts Degrees, 45-49; Master's Degree 
in a Designated Field, 49-51; Master of Agricul- 
ture Degree and Master of Life Science Degree, 
61; Summary of Procedures for the Master's 
Degree in a Designated Field, 61-52; Summary 
of Procedures for the Master of Science Degree 
and the Master of Arts Degree, 53-54; Doctor 
of Philosophy Degree, 54-69; Doctor of Educa- 
tion Etegree, 69; Summary of Procedures for the 
Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education 
Degrees, 69-61 

Graduate School, North Carolina State University, 
17 

Guidance and Personnel Services, 117-118 



H 



Highlands Biological Station, 23 

History, 163-167 

Horticultural Science, 167-170 

Housing, 42-44; Room Rentals, 43; Room 

Changes, 43; Refund of Room Rent, 43-44; 

Room Keys, 44; Married Student Housing, 44; 

Food Services, 44; Linen Rental Service, 44 



Industrial and Technical Education, 118-119 

Industrial Arts Education, 119-120 

Industrial Engineering, 170-174 

Insect Pest Management, 26 

Institutes, 18-19; Institute of Statistics, 18-19; 



THE GRADUATE CATALOG 



327 



Water Resources Research Institute, 19 
International Development, 174-176 



Landscape Architecture, 176-178 

Language Requirements, Master of Science and 
Master of Arts, 48; Master's Degree in a Desig- 
nated Field, 60; Doctor of Philosophy, 56-67 

Library, D. H. Hill, 17-18 

Linen Rental Service, 44 

Loans, 40-41 

M 

Map of the Campus. 328-329 

Marine Laboratory, 277 

Marine Sciences, 178-180 

Married Student Housing, 44 

Master of Agriculture Degrree and Master of Life 

Science Degree, 61 
Master of Science and Master of Arts Degree, 46- 

49; Summary of Procedures for the Master of 

Science Degree and the Master of Arts Degree, 

63-54 
Master's Degree in a Designated Field, 49-51 
Summary of Procedures for the Master's Degree in 

a Designated Field. 61-62 
Materials Engineering, 181-186 
Mathematics, 186-192 

Mathematics and Science Education, 120-121 
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 192-200 
Meteorology, 200-202 
Microbiology, 202-204 
Microfilming Fee, 36 
Military Education and Training, 41-42 
Modern Languages, 204 



N 



Refund of Room Rent. 43-44 

Refund of Tuition and Fees, 87 

Registration, 31-33; Registration for Couraes at 
Other Campuses of the Consolidated University, 
31-32; Physical Examinations. 32; Course Load, 
32-33 

Reproductive Physiology Research Laboratory, 26 

Residence Halls, 42-43 

Residence Requirements, Master of Science and 
Master of Arts Degrees, 47; Doctor of Philoso- 
phy Degrree, 56 

Residence Status, 37-38 

Room Rentals, Changes. Keys, 43-44 



S 



Sociology and Anthropology, 242-248 

Soil Science, 249-251 

Southeastern Plant Environment Laboratories, 26 

Special Education. 122 

Special Laboratories and Facilities, 22-26; Adult 
Learning Center, 22; Biology Field Laboratory, 
22; Computing Facilities, 22-23; Electron Mi- 
croscope Center, 23; Highlands Biological Sta- 
tion, 23; Nuclear Service Facilities, 24; Center 
for Occupational Education, 24; Pesticide Resi- 
due Research Laboratory. 24-25; Reproductive 
Physiology Research Laboratory, 26; South- 
eastern Plant Environment Laboratories, 26; 
Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 26-26 

Special Training Programs, 26-27; Insect Pest 
Management, 26; Research Program at the Oak 
Ridge Associated Universities, 26-27 

Statistics, 251-260 

Statistics, Institute erf, 18-19 

Summer School Fees. 37 



National Direct Student Loans. 40-4 1 
North Carolina State University, 15-16; Adminis- 
tration. 7 
North Carolina System, University of, 3-4 
Nuclear Engineering, 206-208 
Nuclear Service Facilities, 24 
Nutrition, 208-210 

O 

Oak Ridge Associated Universities Research Pro- 
gram, 26-27 
Occupational Education. 121-122 
Occupational Education. Center for. 24 
Operations Research, 210-213 



Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory, 24-25 

Peterson, Dean W. J., 6 

Physical Examinations. 32 

Physical Oceanography. 214 

Physics. 215-219 

Physiology. 219-221 

Plant Environment Laboratories, Southeas' 

em, 26 
Plant Pathology, 221-224 
Politics, 224-231 
Poultry Science, 231-232 
Product Design, 232-234 
Psychology, 234-240 



TextUe Chemistry, 261-263 

Textile Technology, 263-266 

Textiles. 260-266 

Toxicology. 266-267 

Triangle Universities Consortium on Air Pollu- 
tion, 27 

Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, 25-26 

Trustees. Board of. North Carolina State Uni- 
versity. 281 

Tuition and Fees, 34-38; Semester Rates, 34; 
Required Fees. 34; Special Registration and 
Fees. 34-36; Tuition and Fees for Part-Time 
Students-Semester Rates, 36; Fees for Summer 
School, 37; Refund of Tuition and Fees. 37; 
Residence Status. 37-38; Classification Pro- 
cedures. 38 



Urban Design, 267-269 



W 



Water Resources, 269-273 
Water Resources Research Institute, 19 
Wood and Paper Science, 273-276 
Work- Study Program, 41 



Recreation Resources Administration, 240-242 



Zoology, 276-280 



North Carolina State University 




Hoi 


aday Hall Court 


1. 
2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 


Holladay Hall 
Alumni Memorial Bu 
Watauga Hall 
Leazar Hall 
Peele Hall 
Memorial Tower 
Chancellor's Residen 
Traffic Information 


Syme-Brooks Court 


11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 

)5. 


Brooks Hall 

Gold Hall 

Welch Hall 

Syme Hall 

King Religious Cente 


Becton-Berry Quadrangle 


21. 
22 


Quad Snack Bar 
Bagwell Hall 




Gardner Hall Addition 
Gardner Hall 
Phytotron 
Scott Hall 
Kilgore Hall 

Horticulture Headhouse ond Greenhouses 
Botany-Entomology-Genet ics-Plant Po- 
thology Heodhouse and Greenhouses 
Plant Pathology Headhouse and Green- 
houses 

Crop Science-Soil Science Headhouse 
and Greenhouses 
Clork Laboratories 
Nelson Textile Building 



University Student Center Ploza 

91. William Neal Reynolds Coliseum 

92. University Student Center 

93. Carmichoel Gymnosium 

94. Students Supply Store 

95. Music Building 

96. Case Athletics Center 



23. 


Berry Hall 


24. 


Clork Holl Infirmary 


25. 


Becton Hall 


26. 


Frank Thompson Theater 


27. 


Field House 


28. 


Car Wash 


29. 


Power Plant 


30. 


Laundry 


31. 


Park Shops 


32. 


Morris Building and West 




Riddick Stands 


Cou 


rt of North Carolina 


41. 


Poe Hall 


42. 


Page Hall 


43. 


191 1 Building 


44 


Winston Hall 


45. 


Tompkins Hall 


46. 


Primrose Hall 


Gardner Arboretum 


51. 


Ricks Hall 


52. 


Withers Hall 


53. 


Daniels Hall 


54. 


Riddick Engineering Laboratories 


55. 


Mann Hall 


56. 


Burlington Engineering Laboratories 


57. 


Patterson Holl 



University Ploza 

61. D.H. Hill Library — original wing 

62. D.H. Hill Library — book stack tower 

63. D.H. Hill Library— Erdahl-Cloyd wing 

64. Polk Hall 

65. Broughton Hall 

66. Bureou of Mines 

67. Cox Hall 

68. Harrelson Holl 

69. Dobney Holl 

70. Williams Holl 



■I. Turlington-Alexander Court 

101. Alexander Hall 

102. Turlington Holl 

I. Tucker-Owen Court 

106. Owen Hall 

107. Tucker Hall 

108. Harris Cafeteria 

109. Bowen Hall 

110. Metcolf Hall 

111. Carroll Hall 

1 12. Physical Plant Maintenance Shop 

113. Print Shop 

K. Lee-Bragaw Court 

116. Brogow Holl 

117. Lee Holl 

118. Sullivan Hall 

L. Western Boulevard Court 

121. Hodges Wood Products Laboratory 

122. Biltmore Hall 

123. Robertson Wing of Biltmore Holl 

124. Weaver Laboratories 

125. Grinnells Animal Health Loboratory 

126. Schaub Food Science Building 

127. WUNC-TV 

128. Agricultural Experiment Station — Old 
Central Station 

129. Central Stores 

Railroad Underpasses 

131. Pedestrian Underpass— Don Allen Drive 

132. Pedestrian Underpass — Students Supply 
Store 

133 Pedestrian Underpass — Coliseum 
134. Pedestrian Underposs — Riddick Lot 

M. Fraternity Court 

N. McKimmon Village (Married Student Housing) 

O. 840 Method Rood Greenhouses 



J 



\ 



1/ 



/ 



\ 




North 
Carolina 

i %^i^^ State 

University 
J Bulletin 

SUMMER SESSIONS 1974 



FEBRUARY, 1974 







NUMBER 1 





SUMMER SESSIONS 1974 



North Carolina State University 
Raleigh, North Carolina 



NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 



SUMMER SESSIONS 1974 

REGISTRATION APPLICATION INFORMATION 

Only special (non-degree) students are eligible to use the attached summer 
sessions registration application. 

The registration application form ( opposite page) must be used by all visit- 
ing students from other colleges or universities who will be classified as special 
students and by all students who are currently classified as special students 
at North Carolina State University. 

A special student is one who has not been formally admitted as a degree 
candidate to North Carolina State University and does not wish a r^ular 
classification of any kind at the University. Students classified as special stu- 
dents are limited to a class load of not more than seven semester hours. How- 
ever, in unusual cases, a special student visiting from another school may be 
allowed to take more than seven hours provided permission is obtained from 
the Director of Summer Sessions. 

NOTE: Special students from other universities and collies are advised that 
North Carolina State University students are always given priority 
for Summer Sessions classes. 

STUDENTS NOT ELIGIBLE TO USE THE ENCLOSED SUMMER 
SESSIONS REGI^RATION APPLICATION 

1. The registration application form (opposite page) is not to be used by any 
classified degree candidate, undergraduate or graduate, now attending 
North Carolina State University. Such students must preregister through 
their advisers. 

2. The registration application (opposite page) is not to be used by any stu- 
dent who has previously enrolled as a degree candidate at North Carolina 
State University. Such students (former students returning) must apply 
for readmission to the University by writing to the Registrar, Department 
of Registration and Records, Peele Hall, P. O. Box 5126, North Carolina 
State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 

INFORMATION 

For additional information about the Summer Sessions write to: 

The Director of Summer Sessions 
North Carolina State University 
Box 5125 
Raleigh, N.C. 27607 

or call 737-2265. 



CONTENTS 



Administration 4 

Summer Sessions Calendar 1974 5 

North Carolina State University 6 

The Summer Sessions 7 

Admissions 8 

R^istration 11 

Expenses 14 

Financial Aid 16 

Counseling 16 

Housing 16 

D. H. Hill Library 18 

Summer Activities 20 

University Student Center 21 

Special Courses and Institutes 21 

Reading Workshop 21 

Adult and Community College Education 21 

English Institute for Foreign Students 23 

Course Listings 25 

Summer Sessions Faculty 77 

University Disruptions Policy and Procedures 88 

Campus Map 92 



NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 



ADMINISTRATION 

John T. Caldwell, Chancellor 

Harry C. Kelly, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost 

Walter J. Peterson, Dean of the Graduate School 

Earl G. Droessler, Administrative Dean for Research 

William L. Turner, Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

Jackson A. Rigney, Dean for Intematiotial Programs 

John D. Wright, Vice Chancellor for Finance and Business 

Rudolph Pate, Director of Foundations and Development 



DEANS OF THE SCHOOLS 

James E. L^ates, School of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Claude E. McKinney, School of Design 

Carl J. Dolce, School of Education 

Ralph E. Fadum, School of Engineering 

Eric L. Ellwood, School of Forest Resources 

Robert 0. Tilman, School of Liberal Arts 

Arthur C. Menius, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

David W. Chaney, School of Textiles 



SUMMER SESSIONS 

William L. Turner, Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 
Charles F. Kolb, Associate Director 

ADMISSIONS 

Kenneth D. Raab, Director 

REGISTRATION 

James H. Bundy, University Registrar 



SUMMER SESSIONS 
CALENDAR 1974 



FIRST SESSION 



May 8 
May 20 


Wednesday 
Monday 


May 21 
May 24 


Tuesday 
Friday 


June 6 


Thursday 


June 24 
June 25 


Monday 
Tuesday 



SECOND SESSION 

June 19 Wednesday 

July 1 Monday 



July 2 
July 4 
July 8 


Tuesday 

Thursday 

Monday 


July 19 


Friday 


August 6 
August 7 


Tuesday 
Wednesday 



Last day to preregister for first session. 
New student orientation; registration 
8:30 a.m. to 12 noon; late registration 
fee for those who complete registration 
after 12 noon, May 20. 
First day of classes. 
Last day to register; last day to with- 
draw (or drop a course) with refund. 
Last day to drop a course or withdraw 
without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 



Last day to preregister for second ses- 
sion. 

New student orientation; r^istration 
8:30 a.m. to 12 noon; late registration 
fee for those who complete registration 
after 12 noon, July 1. 
First day of classes. 
Holiday. 

Last day to register; last day to with- 
draw (or drop a course) with refund. 
Last day to drop a course or withdraw 
without a grade. 
Last day of classes. 
Final examinations. 






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r/ie central North Carolina State University campus covers nearly 600 acres. 

NORTH CAROLINA 
STATE UNIVERSITY 



North Carolina State University is a large and complex state university, 
one of the major state universities of the nation. 

It shares the distinctive character of Land-Grant state universities nation- 
ally — broad academic offerings, extensive public involvement, national and 
international activities, and large-scale extension and research programs. 

State was founded as a Land-Grant state university under terms of the 
famed federal Morrill Act of 1862 which provided for public land endowments 
to support a college in each state. 

The Land-Grant heritage of fulfilling three major functions — research, 
extension and academic affairs — is reflected in the large dimensions of these 
functions at North Carolina State University. 

The rich and varied academic program of the University is comprised of 
some 70 bachelors of arts and science programs, 67 master's degree fields and 
45 doctoral degrees. 

Its research activities span a broad spectrum of about 700 scientific, tech- 
nologic and scholarly endeavors, with a budget of over $20 million annually. 

Extension programs of the University are similarly diverse and include 
urban affairs, marine sciences, environmental protection, engineering indus- 
trial and textiles extension, agricultural extension and many others. 

The annual University's budget is about $80 million. The University has 
4,600-plus employees. There are 1,621 faculty and professional staff and 157 



adjunct and federal figency faculty, including 974 graduate faculty. 

There are 120 campus buildings with an estimated value of about 
$120,000,000. 

The central campus is 596 acres, though the University has 88,000 acres, 
including one research and endowment forest of 78,000 acres. Research farms; 
biology and ecology sites; genetics, horticulture, and floriculture nurseries; 
and Carter Stadium areas near the main campus comprise about 2,500 acres. 

Principal operational locations for the University in North Carolina are the 
Marine Sciences Center at Wilmington, the Fisheries Laboratory at Hatteras, 
the Minerals Research Laboratory at Asheville, the Pamlico Marine Labora- 
tory at Aurora, and the 20 agricultural research stations and forests. 

North Carolina State University is one of the three Research Triangle 
Universities along with Duke University and the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill. In the 30-mile triangle formed by the three Universi- 
ties is the 5,000-acre Research Triangle Park, the Research Triangle Institute, 
a Universities' subsidiary, and the Triangle Universities Computation Center, 
a central facility for the extensive computing centers of the institutions. 

In the fall of 1973, the University's total enrollment was about 14,200. There 
are 11,640 undergraduates, 2,375 graduate students and about 200 other stu- 
dents. Students at State come from all 50 states and some 60 other countries. 
The international enrollment is a distinctive feature of the institution and its 
international students give it a decidedly cosmopolitan aura. 

North Carolina State University is organized in eight schools and the 
Graduate School. The eight schools are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Design, 
Education, Engineering, Forest Resources, Liberal Arts, Physical and Mathe- 
matical Sciences and Textiles. In addition, a complex of divisions and programs 
provide for a wide range of special programs in academic affairs, research and 
extension. 

State is one of 118 recognized members of the National Association of State 
Universities and Land-Grant Colleges. It is also a member of the American 
Council on Education, the College Entrance Examination Board, the Council 
of Graduate Schools in the United States, the National Commission on Accred- 
iting, and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. 

The University is accredited by national and regional accrediting agencies 
applicable to the University and its numerous professional fields. 

In addition to the 14,200 regularly-enrolled students, 12,796 persons enrolled 
in 1973 in State's credit and non-credit continuing education courses. The 1973 
Summer Sessions drew 7,683 students. Other enrollments included 9,359 
in some 180 short courses, 881 in cultural and professional enrichment courses, 
1,356 in off-campus credit courses and 1,200 in correspondence courses. 

In the fall of 1973, 64.6 percent of the entering freshmen were in the top one- 
quarter of their high school graduating classes. A total of 94 percent were in 
the top half of their classes. About 84 percent of all applicants are accepted. 
The average combined SAT score for the entering freshmen in 1973 was 1020. 

THE SUMMER SESSIONS 

The Summer Sessions at North Carolina State University offer an extensive 
educational program planned to meet the varied needs and interests of almost 
8,000 students. Fifty departments offer instruction in more than 500 courses, 



over one-third of which are at the graduate level. 

Each of State's eight schools, with a combined faculty of more than 300, 
participates in the summer study program: six schools offer courses during 
two regular five-week sessions, the School of Design offers one nine-week 
program, the School of Forest Resources conducts a summer camp for sopho- 
mores and two five-week practicums, and the School of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences ofiFers a three-week program for extension workers and other adult 
educators. In addition, special programs and institutes are offered during the 
summer by the University. 

Summer courses and special programs are designed for the new student, the 
undergraduate wanting to advance his or her academic standing at State, the 
graduate desiring to continue study and research during the summer months 
and for visiting students pursuing degrees at other institutions. Teachers who 
need to earn credit toward renewal of teaching certificates or advanced degrees 
in education and persons in professional fields who wish to keep abreast of new 
developments and trends also take advantage of State's summer programs. In 
addition, the Summer Sessions offer high school students planning to enroll 
at North Carolina State University the opportunity of taking required sub- 
college work in English and mathematics. 

ADMISSIONS 

All students regardless of race or sex are equally welcome at North Carolina 
State University. Anyone may apply for and accept admission confident that 
the policy and practices of the University will be administered without 
discrimination. 

Students are admitted to the Summer Sessions in one of seven categories: 
(1) new freshmen; (2) new undergraduate transfer students; (3) new graduate 
students; (4) special students; (5) continuing NCSU students; (6) former 
NCSU students; (7) suspended NCSU students. 

NEW FRESHMEN 

Application forms for new freshmen should be obtained from the Director 
of Admissions, Peele Hall, P. 0. Box 5126, North Carolina State University, 



The School of Education headquartered in Poe Hall is one of the eight NCSU 
schools offering courses during the two five-week summer sessions. 




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Students view a two^endvlum harmonograph demonstration presented by their 
mathematics professor. 



Raleigh, N. C. 27607. The summer school application form in this catalog 
should not be completed. 

A freshman applicant should be a graduate of an accredited secondary school 
and have the recommendation of his principal or headmaster. Non-graduates 
should have a high school equivalency certificate. The following high school 
preparation, or its equivalent, is recommended: English, four years; algebra, 
two years; geometry, one year (advanced algebra and trigonometry is recom- 
mended for students entering the Schools of Engineering, Physical and Mathe- 
matical Sciences, Design and Forest Resources); science, two years (including 
either chemistry or physics); social studies, two years. Students entering the 
School of Liberal Arts should complete at least two years of foreign language. 

Freshman applicants must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board and have their scores submitted to the Office of 
Admissions by the Board. These scores, together with the high school record, 
will be considered in determining admissibility. Information as to the time and 
place of the Scholastic Aptitude Test will be given may be obtained from high 
school principals or counselors, or by writing directly to the College Entrance 
Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 for the Bulletin of 
Information. The Bulletin includes an application form and is available with- 
out charge. 

The Achievement Test scores are not used in the admissions decision. It is 
recommended for best placement that each freshman take several Achievement 
Tests, depending upon the college curriculum the applicant intends to enter. 
The January test date during the senior year in high school is recommended. 
Additional information concerning these tests is included in the Freshman 
University Bulletin and the Notice of Admissions. 



NEW TRANSFER STUDENTS 

In addition to submitting an application form which may be obtained from 
the Director of Admissions, Peele Hall, all transfer students must have official 
transcripts sent to the Admissions Office directly from each institution at- 
tended. The summer school application in this catalog should not be completed. 

Transfer applicants must have an overall grade average of "C" (2.0) or 
better on all college-level academic work attempted and be eligible to return to 
the last collie or university attended. For admission as an upper-class trans- 
fer student, the applicant must present a minimum of 28 semester hours of 
work with grades of "C" or better from accredited institutions. If credit has not 
been received on a college-level mathematics course, the secondary school 
record must be submitted. Those applicants with less than 28 semester hours 
of transferable credit must also meet the admissions requirements for entering 
freshmen. Out-of-state students should be prepared to meet higher standards 
especially in agriculture and life sciences, design, forest resources and psy- 
chology. 

NEW GRADUATE STUDENTS 

All students working toward advanced degrees are enrolled in the Graduate 
School. An application for Graduate School admission may be obtained from 
the Dean of the Graduate School, Peele Hall, P. O. Box 5335, North Carolina 
State University, Raleigh, N. C. 27607. 

STUDENTS ADMITTED TO THE FALL SEMESTER 

Any student cleared for r^ular admission for the fall semester wishing to 
attend either summer session should notify the Admissions Office, Peele Hall, 
to change his date of entrance. He should 7iot fill out a summer sessions 
application. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Special students must complete the Summer Sessions registration applica- 
tion in the front of this catalog. A special student is one who has not been 
formally admitted as a degree candidate at North Carolina State University. 
All students visiting from other schools will be classified as special students. 
Special students are limited to a class load of not more than seven semester 
hours. In unusual cases, a special student visiting from another college may be 
allowed to take more than seven hours if permission is obtained from the Direc- 
tor of Summer Sessions. 

NOTE: Public school teachers who have never been enrolled as regular stu- 
dents at North Carolina State University and who are renewing an 
"A" certificate may register as special students if they desire; those 
renewing a graduate certificate should register as a Graduate Spe- 
cial. The Division of Professional Services requires a graduate classi- 
fication for the renewal of a graduate certificate. Students desiring 
regular graduate status must apply ibr admission through the Grad- 
uate School. 

CONTINUING NCSU STUDENTS 

Any regular NCSU degree candidate student may attend summer school. 
10 



The summer school application in this catalog should not be completed, but 
r^istration procedures as listed on pages 11-13 should be followed. 

READMISSION OF FORMER NCSU STUDENTS 

Former North Carolina State University students who wish to attend the 
Summer Sessions must apply for readmission through the Department of 
Registration and Records at least 30 days prior to the intended date of return. 
The readmission application may be obtained by writing to the Department of 
R^istration and Records, Peele Hall, P. O. Box 5126, North Carolina State 
University, Raleigh, N. C. 27607. The summer school application in this cata- 
log should not be completed. 

SUSPENDED NCSU STUDENTS 

Students suspended at the end of the spring semester, 1974, may attend one 
or both sessions of summer school to make up a quality point deficiency to 
become eligible to continue in the fall. The summer school application in this 
catalog should }iot be completed, but registration procedures as listed on pages 
11-13 should be followed. 

Students suspended prior to the spring semester, 1974, may attend one or 
both sessions of summer school but should follow readmissions procedures. The 
readmission application may be obtained by writing to the Department of 
Registration and Records, Peele Hall, P. O. Box 5126, North Carolina State 
University, Raleigh, N. C. 27607. 

REGISTRATION 

PREREGISTRATION FOR NCSU DEGREE STUDENTS 

All NCSU degree students who plan to attend summer school must preregis- 
ter. Preregistration consists of selecting the courses to be taken during the 
first and/or second session and filing a Preregistration Schedule Request Form 
with the Department of Registration and Records. On registration day, each 
student obtains his completed class schedule. (NOTE: Graduate students who 
preregister will be allowed to complete registration by mail.) 

Currently enrolled degree students will preregister for the summer session 
at the time they preregister for the 1974 fall semester. 

Former degree students returyiing may preregister for the summer session 
after they have filed an application for readmission and have received their 
letter of approval. 

Neiv freshmen and new transfer degree students who desire to attend the 
summer session should contact the Admissions Ofilce. 

The preregistration period for all NCSU degree students will be from Mon- 
day, April 1, 1974, through Friday, April 19, 1974. The last day to preregister 
for the first summer session will be Wednesday, May 8, 1974, and for the 
second session, Wednesday, June 19, 1974. 

PREREGISTRATION FOR NON-DEGREE STUDENTS 

Special (non-degree) students will preregister for the summer session by 
completing the Summer Sessions R^istration Application in the front of the 

11 




Proper weighing of chemical ingredients give these chemistry students the start 
of a successftd experiment. 

Summer Sessions Catalog and filing this with the Summer Sessions Office by 
mail or in person. Preregistration requests for the first summer session will 
be accepted through Wednesday, May 8, 1974, and for second session through 
Wednesday, June 19, 1974. 

REGISTRATION 

All students will complete registration on May 20 (first session) and/or 
July 1 (second session) at Reynolds Coliseum. R^istration on both days will 
be from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon. There will be a $10 late registration fee for all 
students who fail to register by 12 noon on the respective registration day. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

If a regularly enrolled degree student wishes to withdraw from the Univer- 
sity during the summer session or semester (dropping all course work for 
which he has registered), he must initiate the official withdrawal process at 
the Counseling Center. Special students (non-degree) who wish to withdraw 
should contact the Division of Continuing Education. 

Determination of grades and the entry on the permanent record for a student 
withdrawing during a summer session (or semester) depend upon his reasons 
for withdrawal, the time of withdrawal in the summer session (or semester), 
and his standing in his courses at the time of withdrawal. A student who dis- 
continues attendance in all classes without officially withdrawing will receive 
all "FD" grades. 

A student who withdraws after the fourth day of classes in a summer session 
(or after the first two weeks of classes in a regular semester) will not receive 

12 



any refund of tuition and fees, except in unusual cases approved by the refundi 
committee. The committee is empowered to approve a petition for unexpected 
military orders, when a physician advises withdrawal due to extensive ill- 
ness, or when circumstances justify waiving the rules. These petitions are 
available in the office of the Dean of the Division of Student Affairs. 

SUSPENDED NCSU STUDENTS 

Students suspended at the end of the spring semester, 1974, may attend one 
or both sessions of summer school to make up a quality point deficency to be- 
come eligible to continue in the fall. The summer school application in this 
calalog should not be completed, but registration procedures as listed on pages 
11-13 should be followed. 

Students suspended prior to the spring semester, 1974, may attend one or 
both sessions of summer school but should follow readmissions procedures. 
The readmission application may be obtained by writing to the Department of 
Registration and Records, Peele Hall, P. O. Box 5126, North Carolina State 
University, Raleigh, N. C. 27607. 

SPECIAL NOTES 

1. Tuition and fees are payable by check or cash on the day of registration. 
Students must have the necessary funds with them. Advanced billing of 
tuition and fees will be made 07ily for those students who preregister. 

2. Students planning to take courses in both sessions should plan their 
sequences well in advance. Offerings in the second session are often sub- 
stantially less in number than in the first session, and in many instances, 
departments do not offer courses in both summer sessions. 

3. Everything possible will be done to ensure that the courses listed in the 
catalog will be given at the time indicated. The Director of Summer 
Sessions reserves the right, however, to tvithdraw courses in which en- 
rollment is deemed insufficient. 

4. The normal load for either session of summer school is six or seven hours 
for undergraduates and six hours for graduates. Any student may carrj' 
less. R^ularly enrolled students who desire to carry more than seven 
hours must obtain the approval of the dean or director of instruction of 
the school in which they are enrolled. Such approval in writing must be 
presented to the Director of Summer Sessions. Students visiting from 
other schools who wish to take more than seven hours must obtain the 
approval of the Director of Summer Sessions. 



13 



EXPENSES 

The following expenses apply for each of the regular five-week sessions. 

TUITION AND FEES 





RESIDENT 






NONR 


ESIDEN 


T 




Tuition 








Tuition 








and 








and 








Academic 








Academic 






yurs 


Fees 


Fees 


Total 


Hoars 


Fees 


Fees 


Total 


1 


$ 17.75 


$28.00 


$ 45.75 


1 


$ 57.50 


$28.00 


$ 85.50 


2 


28.50 


28.00 


56.50 


2 


108.00 


28.00 


136.00 


3 


39.25 


28.00 


67.25 


3 


158.50 


28.00 


186.50 


4 


50.00 


28.00 


78.00 


4 


209.00 


28.00 


237.00 


5 


60.75 


28.00 


88.75 


5 


259.50 


28.00 


287.50 


6 


71.50 


28.00 


99.50 


6 


310.00 


28.00 


338.00 


7 


82.25 


28.00 


110.25 


7 


360.50 


28.00 


388.50 


8 


93.00 


28.00 


121.00 


8 


411.00 


28.00 


439.00 


9 


103.75 


28.00 


131.75 


9 


461.50 


28.00 


489.50 


10 


114.50 


28.00 


142.50 


10 


512.00 


28.00 


540.00 



A sea of textbooks and manuals surrounds an NCSU student pausing by the Student 
Supply Store. 



'A 






= ^s = 



REQUIRED FEES 

(must be paid by all students) 

Medical $ 6.00 

Student Center 16.50 

Physical Education 5.50 



$28.00 
SPECIAL REGISTRATION AND FEES 

Summer Research (GR 596S or GR 696S) 

In-Residence ($27.25 plus $28.00 fees) $55.25 

Not-In-Residence 27.25 

Thesis Preparation Only (GR 598 or GR 698) 

In-Residence ($27.25 plus $28.00 fees) 55.25 

Not-In-Residence 27.25 

Dissertation Research (GR 697) 

In-Residence ($27.25 plus $28.00 fees) 55.25 

Not-In-Residence 27.25 

Examination Only (GR 597) 

In-Residence ($17.75 plus $28.00 fees) 45.75 

Not-In-Residence 17.75 

Audits Rates same as for credit 

Full-Time Faculty and Staff 7.00 

RESIDENCE STATUS 

North Carolina's General Assembly in its 1973 session amended the law 
applying to determination of a student's residence status for tuition purposes 
(G.S. 116-143.1) to read: "To qualify for in-state tuition a legal resident must 
have maintained his domicile in North Carolina for at least the 12 months 
immediately prior to his classification as a resident for tuition purposes. In 
order to be eligible for such classification, the individual must establish that 
his or her presence in the State during such 12-month period was for purposes 
of maintaining a bona fide domicile rather than for purposes of mere temporary 
residence incident to enrollment in an institution of higher education; further, 
(1) if the parents (or court-appointed legal guardian) of an individual seeking 
resident classification are (is) bona fide domiciliaries of this State, this fact 
shall be prima facie evidence of domiciliary status of the individual applicant 
and (2) if such parents or guardian are not bona fide domiciliaries of this State, 
this fact shall be prima facie evidence of non-domiciliary status of the individ- 
ual." 

University regulations concerning the classification of students by residence, 
for purposes of applicable tuition differentials, are set forth in detail in A 
Manual To Assist The Public Higher Education Institutions of North Carolina 
in the Matter of Student Residence Classification for Tuition Purposes. Each 
enrolled student is responsible for knowing the contents of the Manunl, which 
is the controlling administrative statement of policy on this subject. Copies 
of the Manual are available on request at the Admissions Office, 112 Peele Hall. 



15 



REFUND OF TUITION AND FEES 

A student who withdraws from school on or before the fourth day of classes 
of either summer session will receive a refund of the full amount paid less a 
r^istration fee. After the period specified, no refunds will be made. 

REFUND COMMITTEE 

In some instances circumstances justify waiving rules regarding refunds. 
An example might be^withdrawal from the University because of illness. Stu- 
dents have the privilege of appeal to the refund committee when they feel spe- 
cial consideration is merited. Application for such appeals may be secured from 
the Division of Student Affairs. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The financial aid available to regular students attending summer school is 
ordinarily limited to loans and jobs. Students who must have financial aid 
should make application to the Financial Aid Office, 205 Peele Hall, as far in 
advance as possible, preferably by April 1. 

The University has no financial aid for summer visitor students. However, 
these students may have access to the part-time job listings in the Financial 
Aid Office. 

COUNSELING 

The Counseling Center in Peele Hall has a staff of full-time counselors to 
help students with the problems of adjustment to college life, problems of vo- 
cational and curricular choice and other problems a student might wish to 
discuss with a professionally trained counselor. The Center administers apti- 
tude and interest tests and maintains a file of occupational information to help 
guide students in career selection. 

Referral can be made for students needing special kinds of help. 

Students may come to the Center on their own accord, or they may be re- 
ferred by teachers, advisers or other members of the University staff. There 
is no charge for conferences, but a small materials fee is charged when tests 
are administered. 



HOUSING 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

During the 1974 summer sessions, housing will be provided for men and 
women. To be eligible to live in a residence hall, a student must be enrolled for 
one or more courses. Participants in short courses, conferences, and workshops 
of less than one month's duration will be located in separate facilities. These 
persons should write to the director of their program for specific housing infor- 
mation and application pertaining to their particular group. 

Assignment to a room for the summer session does not guarantee that a room 
will be available for the fall semester. A student must be accepted by NCSU for 
fall enrollment in order to be eligible to apply for University housing. 

16 



A selected student staff under the supervision of professionally trained per- 
sonnel will be available to advise and assist residents. They also are responsible 
for overseeing the operation of the building and its condition. 

The rooms are furnished with desks, dressers, beds, and closets and the build- 
ing is equipped with lounges, laundry rooms and vending areas. 

MARRIED STUDENT HOUSING 

The University operates 300 apartments (McKimmon Village) for married 
students. Information on availability and application should be requested from 
the Department of Residence Life, North Carolina State University, Box 5072, 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27607. 

FRATERNITY HOUSES 

Several of the 17 fraternity houses located on or adjacent to the campus 
provide housing for summer school students. Twelve of the 17 houses are fully 
air-conditioned and all provide furnished rooms and living areas. In addition, 
several houses offer board plans during the summer months. Any student in- 
terested in further details should write to the Office of Student Development, 
204 Peele Hall, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, N. C. 27607 or tele- 
phone 737-2442. 

ROOM RENTALS AND APPLICATIONS 

The rental rate for a five- week session is $50 per person in a double room. 
If space is available, a single room may be reserved for $65 each session. To 
obtain an assignment, the student completes the room application card (new 
students will be mailed a card) and returns it with a check to the Office of 
Business Affairs, North Carolina State University, Box 5067, Raleigh, N. C. 
27607. The room assignment will be mailed if time permits, or may be picked 
up at the Department of Residence Life in Leazar Hall on the day the residence 
halls open for the session. 

Residents will be permitted to change rooms after the first week of classes 
with the approval of the Department of Residence Life. The room change fee 
is $5.00. Opening days of the residence halls: 

First Session — 12 noon, Saturday, May 18, 1974 
Second Session — 12 noon, Saturday, June 29, 1974 

An "Introduction to Politics" class engages in a lively discussion as the news of 
the day is related to classroom studies. 




HOUSING REFUND POLICY 

A room application must be cancelled in writing addressed to the Depart- 
ment of Residence Life, North Carolina State University, Box 5072, Raleigh, 
N. C. 27607. 

If the room application is cancelled BEFORE the opening day of the resi- 
dence halls, the rental fee paid will be refunded less a $10 processing fee. 

// the room application is cancelled AFTER the halls officially open, a 
refund will be given only if the space is reassigned to a NEW resident. The 
refund will be the rental fee paid less $10 processing fee and a prorated daily 
charge from the opening day of the halls until the space is reassigned. If there 
are more vacant spaces than there are room applications waiting for assign- 
ment, NO REFUND of room rent will be made until ALL spaces are filled. 

If a student fails to check-in and secure his or her keys by the first day of 
classes, the room application will be subject to cancellation and NO REFUNDS 
will be made except as stated above. 

D. H. HILL LIBRARY 

The D. H. Hill Library of North Carolina State University houses a collec- 
tion of more than 650,000 volumes of books and bound journals. The collection 
has been developed to reflect the scientific and technological interests of the 
University, but the arts and social sciences are also well represented. The 
library subscribes to more than 6,500 current periodicals and receives all 
publications of the various experiment stations. The library has been a deposi- 
tory for U.S. Government publications since 1924 and has been designated as 
one of the depositories for all unclassified publications of the Atomic Energy 
Commission, the National Aeronautics and Space Agency, and the Food and 
Agricultural Organization of the United Nations. Publications from many 
foreign countries are received on exchange — especially those publications 
dealing with the sciences and engineering. 

Three special interest collections form on-campus branches of the main 
library. The Textiles Library, housed in Nelson Hall, contains holdings in 
textiles and textile chemistry. The School of Design Library, in Brooks Hall, 
has a collection of books, journals and slides in the fields of architecture, land- 
scape architecture and product design. A Forest Resources Library and read- 
ing room is available in Biltmore Hall. 

There are several reading rooms in the air-conditioned library building. 
Carrels, conference and seminar rooms are available for students and faculty. 
The library maintains a photocopy service, and equipment for reading micro- 
films and microcards is available. 

The scholar, student and browser will each discover the materials and 
services of the library to be useful and enjoyable additions to his summer 
sessions program. The bookstack and all areas of the library complex are open 
to all students and faculty. 

Library hours for the Summer Sessions are as follows: 
Monday-Friday 8 a.m. - 11 p.m. 

Saturday 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. 

Sunday 1 p.m. - 10 p.m. 



18 




Multi-disciplinary 
research efforts 
such as the above 
study of lagoon 
use for animal 
waste disposal 
and recycling is 
carried on in 
summer months. 



Carroll residence 
hall (right). 




SUMMER ACTIVITIES 

Through many curricular and extracurricular activities, the Summer Ses- 
sions provide special opportunities to those students engaged in summer study. 
Interesting, informative and entertaining programs and activities are sched- 
uled for each session. 

A few of the more popular activities and special features include the 
Carmichael Gym athletic and recreation programs and the varied activities 
sponsored by the University Student Center. 

The University's regular program of student personnel services is available 
to summer students. It includes the Counseling Center for educational, career 
and personal counseling; the Career Planning and Placement Center for career 
planning and placement; the Residence Life and Residence Facilities offices 
for residence quarters; the Financial Aid office for financial assistance; and 
the Student Health Service for medical care. 

Several of State's buildings are air-conditioned for summer comfort. Among 
these are the Student Supply Store, where students will find books and equip- 
ment for recreational as well as academic pursuits; Harrelson Hall, State's 
unusual round classroom building where more than half of the Summer 
Sessions classes are held; and the University Student Center, conveniently 
located near many of the residence halls. 

Beyond the campus, the city of Raleigh offers cultural and recreational 
opportunities of interest to students. The Raleigh Little Theater presents 
several productions during the summer, the North Carolina Museum of Art 
sponsors gallery concerts and exhibits, and there are several swimming pools 
and city and state parks located in and around Raleigh. 

A wide variety of modern high-speed machines dem,onstrate to textiles students the 
steps necessary to make fabrics useful. 




20 



UNIVERSITY STUDENT CENTER 

The hub of campus summer activity is the University Student Center. The 
Center is supported in part by student fees, and all regularly enrolled students 
are invited to attend the programs and activities sponsored by the Summer 
Programs Board. 

These programs include movies and a variety of social and recreational 
events. 

The air-conditioned Center offers many facilities, including a television 
lounge, an art gallery, offices for student organization, a billards room, a cloak 
room, a snack bar, a dining room, a theater and meeting rooms. 

A Center annex in the Erdahl-Cloyd Wing of the D. H. Hill Library offers 
a barbershop, a snack bar and a games room. 
Building hours during the summer are: 
University Student Center 

Monday-Saturday 7 a.m.-ll p.m. 

Sunday 9 a.m.-ll p.m. 

University Student Center Annex Snack Bar and Games Area: 
Monday-Friday 7 a.m.- 3 p.m. 

Saturday and Sunday Closed 

Vending open 24 hours a day 

SPECIAL COURSES 
AND INSTITUTES 

Summer Reading Workshop 

The annual Summer Reading Workshop sponsored by the School of Educa- 
tion will provide a reading improvement section for entering college students 
during the second session. Scores on college entrance tests indicate that a number 
of incoming freshmen could benefit from training in the improvement of read- 
ing rate, comprehension and vocabulary building. 

Entering college students who are interested in registering for this training 
should contact Dr. Paul Rust, Director of Reading Workshop, 402 S Poe Hall. 
The workshop will meet from 1000 to 1100 on Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
mornings in 517 Poe Hall. 



Department of Adult and Community College Education 

Special Three-Week Summer Session for Adult and Community College 
Educators 

June 10-28 

The Department of Adult and Community College Education offers a 
special three- week summer program of instruction designed to provide grad- 
uate education and professional improvement opportunities for extension 
workers, community college and technical institute personnel, public school 
adult educators, adult basic education personnel, vocational education 

21 



teachers and others in public or private aduit education services. The program 
provides adult educators with the opportunity to increase their understanding 
of adults, contemporary society, administration of educational programs, 
leadership, social action, group processes, communication and planning. 

The program is interdisciplinary; it utilizes the professional competence 
of a permanent and visiting faculty. Courses are in areas of adult and com- 
munity college education, behavioral and social sciences and technical agri- 
culture The student is encouraged to synthesize concepts from these areas and 
apply them to his or her professional responsibilities. 

Thirteen offerings are scheduled. Each participant may take only one 
course. Currently enrolled degree students at North Carolina State University 
must preregister through the normal preregistration procedures. All other 
students will register the first day of classes. To assist the Department of 
Adult and Community College Education in planning, students who do not 
preregister are requested to complete and return the information form by May 
17. The form may be obtained from Dr. W. L. Gragg, Department of Adult and 
Community College Education, 310 Poe Hall. 

The following courses will be offered: 



ED 537 

ED 596 (001) 

ED 596 (002) 

ED 596 (003) 

ED 596 (004) 

ED 596 (005) 
ED 598 



The Extension and Public Service Function in 
Higher Education 

Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education (Administration of County Extension 
Programs) 

Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education (Classroom Management in Adult Educa- 
tion, ABE, and Programs for the Disadvantaged) 
Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education (Community College Teaching) 
Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education (Evaluation and Accountability in In- 
formal Adult Education Programs) 
Topical Problems in Adult and Community College 
Education (Modern Practice of Adult Education) 
Concepts and Strategies of Understanding, Moti- 
vating and Teaching Disadvantaged Adults 



After classes students break for a game of volleyball. 



^i 




EC 403 Family Economics 

HEC 623 Current Trends in Foods and Nutrition 

HS 414 Residential Landscaping 

ANS 410 Horse Management 

PP 404 Plant Diseases and Their Control 

SSC 541 Soil Fertility 



Summer Institute in English 
For Foreign Students 

July 1-August 7 

The Summer Institute in English for Foreign Students at North Carolina 
State University is designed for those students from other countries who 
intend to pursue university studies or specialized training programs in the 
United States during the academic year beginning in the fall. It is designed to 
furnish them with intensive instruction and practice in the use of the English 
language. Emphasis is placed on developing fluency in speaking and under- 
standing spoken English in addition to developing reading and writing skills. 
The institute also offers orientation to American life and institutions to give 
the students insight into the social and cultural aspects of life in the U.S. and 
help them to adjust to the new environment. There are field trips on weekends 
to various industries and places of historic, cultural and scenic interest. 

Any student who has a score of 450 or above on the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL Test) or an equivalent facility in the use of spoken 
English is eligible to attend the institute. (Information about taking the test 
at one of the centers located in the students' home countries may be obtained 
by writing to: Test of English as a Foreign Language, Educational Testing 
Service, Princeton, New Jersey.) 

Admission to the institute does not imply admission to the regular session 
at North Carolina State University or any other campus of the University of 
North Carolina. 

The institute, which is sponsored by the Division of Continuing Education 
in cooperation with the Summer Sessions and the Department of Modern 
Languages, is under the direction of Miss Virginia M. Prichard of the Depart- 
ment of Modern Languages. All classroom work is conducted in Harrelson 
Hall on the University campus. Classes, including language laboratory prac- 
tice sessions are held five and a half hours a day, Monday through Friday, 
from 0900 to 1230 and from 1400 to 1600. Attendance at the institute does 
not cai-ry academic credit. 

The total cost of the five-week program is approximately $500.00. The cost 
of the institute is estimated on the basis of campus dormitory accommodations 
and meals at the campus cafeterias. Incidental expenses, such as laundry, di'y 
cleaning, entertainment, etc., are not included. (Room rent includes sheets and 
towels.) 

Tuition, Books and Fees $275.00 

Room in Campus Dormitory 66.00 

Food (Estimated) 140.00 

Insurance and Infirmary Fee 16.00 

23 



Financial assistance is available to those students who qualify. The Depart- 
ment of State has made available to the institute a number of tuition grants 
under the auspices of the Institute of International Education. To be eligible 
for one of these grants, a student must arrive in the U.S. just prior to the in- 
stitute and must have been accepted at an American institution of higher 
learning for academic study in the fall. 

For further information about the institute write to Mr. Kelly Crump, 
Program Coordinator, Division of Continuing Education, 121 1911 Building, 
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, 27607. Information 
about financial assistance may be obtained by writing to the same address. 




Foreign students receive an insight into U.S. social and cultural life as well as 
reading, writing and language skills. 



This student is partic- 
ipating in a summer 
internship designed to 
teach recreation re- 
source administration 
students management 
techniques and skills. 



24 




COURSE LISTINGS 



Courses are listed by department, departmental abbreviation and numerical 
designator. Semester hour credits for each course are given following the name 
of the course. Classes meet daily, Monday through Friday, except where speci- 
fied to the contrary. The symbols "LR" and "LB" before the clock hours refer 
to lecture- recitation and laboratory hours, respectively. If there is no symbol 
before the clock hours, lecture-recitation is implied. The symbol "CN" refers 
to the call number for each course. This number must be indicated on the pre- 
r^istration schedule request form by students who are preregistering for 
summer sessions courses. 

Courses numbered from one through 100 are preparatory courses carrying 
no college credit; courses in the 100, 200, 300 and 400 series are primarily 
designed for undergraduates; courses in the 500 series for graduates and 
advanced undergraduates; and courses in the 600 series for graduates only. 

All courses are subject to cancellation by the Director of Summer Sessions 
if there is inadequate enrollment. 

Waiver of prerequisites is at the discretion of the instructor. 

Please note that class meeting times in this catalog are indicated in inter- 
national time which is measured in hours numbered to 24 instead of 12. 




If the schedule The beginning 

shows the class hour in terms of a 

beginning at: 12-hour clock is: 

0800 8:00 a.m. 

0900 9:00a.m. 

1000 10:00 a.m. 

1100 11:00 a.m. 

1200 12:00 noon 

1300 1:00 p.m. 

1400 2:00 p.m. 

1500 3:00 p.m. 



If the schedule The beginning 

shows the class houi- in terms of a 

beginning at: 12-hour clock is: 

1600 4:00 p.m. 

1700 5:00 p.m. 

1800 6:00p.m. 

1900 7:00p.m. 

2000 8:00 p.m. 

2100 9:00 p.m. 

2200 10:00 p.m. 



25 






(CN. 


46-597-001) 





(CN. 


46-598-001) 





(CN. 


46-697-001) 



Special Graduate Categories 

FIRST SESSION AND SECOND SESSION 

GR 597 Masters Exam 

GR 598 MR Thesis Preparation 

GR 697 Dissertation Research 

GR 698 I)R Thesis Preparation (CN. 46-698-001) 

Animal Science 

FIR^ SESSION 

ANS 410 Horse Management 3(2-2) 

Prerequisite: ANS 204 

Special three- week session (June 10 June 28) 

0900-1200 (CN. 10-410-001) 

Currently enrolled degree students at North Carolina State University must pre- 
register through the normal preregistration procedures. All other students will 
register the first day of classes. To assist the Department of Adult and Community 
College Education in planning, all students are requested to compete and return 
the information form by Friday, May 17. The form may be obtained from, Dr. W. L. 
Gragg, Department of Adult and Community College Education, 310 Poe Hall. 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science Maximum 6 

Hours arranged (CN. 10-590-001) 

ANS 699 Research in Animal Science Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 10-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science Maximum 6 

Hours arranged (CN. 10-590-001) 

ANS 699 Research in Animal Science Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 10-699-001) 

Anthropology 

FIRST SESSION 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 3 

0950-1120 (CN. 12-251-001) Beaubier 

1140-1310 (CN. 12-251-002) Beaubier 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 12-252-001) Nickerson 

0950-1120 (CN. 12-252-002) Nickerson 

Biochemistry 

FIRST SESSION 

BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology 2 

Prerequisite: BCH 351 or permission of instructor 

0810-1200 (CN. 15-554-001) 

Three week course Sisler 

BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry Maximum 3 

Prerequisite: BCH 351 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (CN. 15-590-001) Graduate Staff 

26 



BCH 695 Special Topics in Biochemistry Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in biochemistry 

Hours arranged (CN. 15-695-001) Graduate Staff 

BCH 699 Biochemical Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 15-699-001) Graduate Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

BCH 351 Elementary Biochonistry 3 

Prerequisite: CH 223 

0950-1120 (CN. 15-351-001) Main 

BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochonistry Maximum 3 

Prerequisite: BCH 351 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (CN. 15-590-001) Graduate Staff 

BCH 695 Special Topics in Biochemistry Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in biochemistry 

Hours arranged (CN. 15-695-001) Graduate Staff 

BCH 699 Biochemical Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 15-699-001) Graduate Staff 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

FIRST SESSION 

BAE 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in agricultural engineering 

Hours arranged (CN. 16-590-001) Staff 

BAE 690 Special Topics Credits Arranged, 1-4 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 16-690-001) Staff 

BAE 699 Research in Biological and Agricultural Engineering Credits Arranged 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in biological and agricultural engineering 1-4 

Hours arranged (CN. 16-699-001) Graduate Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

BAE 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in agricultural engineering 

Hours arranged (CN. 16-590-001) Staff 

BAE 690 Special Topics Credits Arranged, 1-4 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 16-690-001) Staff 

BAE 699 Research in Biological and Agricultural Engineering Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in biological and agricultural engineering 

Hours arranged (CN. 16-699-001) Graduate Staff 

Biological Sciences 

FIR^ SESSION 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

LR 0800-0930 (CN. 17-100-001) 

LB 1020-1300 T Th (CN. 17-100-101) 

LB 1340-1620 T Th (CN. 17-100-102) 

LB 1020-1300 W F (CN. 17-100-103) 

LB 1340-1620 W F (CN. 17-100-104) Staff 

27 



BS 410 (ENT 410) Biology of Insects 3 

(See entomology, page 46.) 

Bioiiiatheniatics 

FIRST SESSION 

BMA 493 Special Topics in Biomathanatics 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-493-001) Staff 

BMA 591 Special Topics Maximums 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-591-001) Staff 

BM.\ 691 Advanced Special Topics 1-3 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-691-001) Staff 

BMA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: As required 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-699-001) Staff 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-699-002) D. L. Ridgeway 

SECOND SESSION 

BMA 493 Special Topics in Biomathonatics 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-493-001) Staff 

BMA 591 Special Topics Maximum 3 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-591-001) Staff 

BMA 691 Advanced Special Topics 1-3 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-691-001) Staff 

BMA 699 Research Credits Arranged 
Prerequisite: As required 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-699-001) Staff 

Hours arranged (CN. 18-699-002) D. L. Ridgeway 

Botany 

FIRJ^ SESSION 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

(See biological sciences, page 27.) 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

LR 1020-1120 M W (CN. 19-200-001) 

PROB 1020-1120 M T (CN. 19-200-201) Seibert 

LB Hours arranged (Audio-Tutorial) (CN. 19-200-101) 

BO 360 (ZO 360) Introduction to Ecology 4 

Prerequisite: BS 100 or BS 105 

LR 0800-0930 (CN. 19-360-001) 

LB 1340-1750 M W (CN. 19-360-101) 

LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 19-360-102) Dvorak 

BO 590 Topical Problems 1-3 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 19-590-001) Noggle 

28 



BO 693 Special Problems in Botany 

Hours arranged (CN. 19-693-001) 

BO 699 Research 

Hours arranged (CN. 19-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

BO 590 Topical Problems 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
Hours arranged (CN. 19-590-001) 

BO 693 Special Problems in Botany 

Hours arranged (CN. 19-693-001) 

BO 699 Research 

Hours arranged (CN. 19-699-001) 

Chemical Engineering 

FIRST SESSION 

CHE 497 Chemical Engineering Projects 

Elective for seniors in chemical engineering 
Hours arranged (CN. 20-497-001) 

CHE 597 Chemical Engineering Projects 

Prerequiste: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (CN. 20-597-001) 

CHE 699 Research 

Hours arranged (CN. 20-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

CHE 497 Chemical Engineering Projects 

Elective for seniors in chemical engineering. 
Hours arranged (CN. 20-497-0011 

CHE 597 Chemical Engineering Projects 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (CN. 20-597-001) 

CHE 699 Research 

Hours arranged (CN. 20-699-001) 



Credits Arranged 
Noggle 

Credits Arranged 
Graduate Staff 



1-3 

Noggle 

Credits Arranged 
Noggle 

Credits Arranged 
Graduate Staff 



1-3 

Rousseau 
1-3 

Rousseau 

Credits Arranged 
Graduate Staff 



1-3 

Rousseau 
1-3 

Rousseau 

Credits Arranged 
Graduate Staff 



Chemistry 

FIRST SESSION 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 

LR 0800-0930 (CN. 21-101-001) 

LB 1340-1750 M W (CN. 21-101-101) 

(CN. 21-101-102) 

(CN. 21-101-103) 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 

Prerequisite: CH 101 
LR 0950-1120 (CN. 21-103-001) 

LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-103-101) 
(CN. 21-103-102) 
CH 104 Experimental Chanistry 
Corequisite: CH 105 
1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-104-001) 



4 

Staff 



Staff 

1 

Staff 

29 



CH 105 Chemistry — Principles and Applications 

Prerequisite: CH 101 

0950-1120 (CN. 21-105-001) 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CH 101 with a grade of C or better 
LR 0950-1120 (CN. 21-107-001) 

LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-107-101) 
(CN. 21-107-102) 

CH 111 Foundations of Chemistry 

1340-1620 (CN. 21-111-001) 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 

Prerequisite: CH 107 

* LR 0800-0930 (CN. 21-221-001) 

LB 1340-1750 M W (CN. 21-221-101) 

LB 1340-1750 M W (CN. 21-221-102) 

*LR 0950-1120 (CN. 21-221-002) 

LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-221-103) 

LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-221-104) 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 

Prerequisite: CH 221 

LR 0800-0930 (CN. 21-223-001) 

LB 1340-1750 M W (CN. 21-223-101) 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 

Prerequisite: CH 103, or CH 107, or CH 104 and CH 105 
LR 0950-1120 (CN. 21-315-001) 

LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-315-101) 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry 

Prerequisite: CH 103, or CH 107, or CH l04 and CH 105; MA 102 or MA 112 
LR 1140-1310 (CN. 21-331-001) 

LB 1340-1750 MW (CN. 21-331-101) 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 

Prerequisites: CH 107, MA 202, PY 203 or PY 208 

Corequisite: MA 301 

0800-0930 (CN. 21^31-001) 



Staff 
4 

Staff 

4 
Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



CH 499 Senior Research in Chemistry 

Prerequisite: Three years chemistry 
Hours arranged (CN. 21-499-001) 

CH 699 Chanical Research 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in chemistry 
Hours arranged (CN. 21-699-001) 



Staff 
4 

Staff 



Staff 
3 

Staff 
1-3 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 



SECOND SESSION 

CH 101 General Chanistry I 

LR 0800-0930 (CN. 21-101-001) 
LB 1340-1750 M W (CN. 21-101-101) 
(CN. 21-101-102) 
CH 103 General Chemistry II 
Prerequisite: CH 101 
LR 0950-1120 (CN. 21-103-001) 
LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-103-101) 
(CN. 21-103-102) 

*Student8 p reregistering for this course must list one of the laboratory sections listed immediately 
following the lecture section. 



Staff 
4 



Staff 



30 



CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

Prerequisite: CH 101 with grade of C or better 

LR 0950-1120 (CN. 21-107-001) 

LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-107-101) Staff 

(CN. 21-107-102) 
CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

Prerequisite: CH 221 
*LR 0800-0930 (CN. 21-223-001) 

LB 1340-1750 M W (CN. 21-223-101) 

LB 1340-1750 M W (CN. 21-223-102) Staff 

*LR 0950-1120 (CN. 21-223-002) 

LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-223-103) 
LB 1340-1750 T Th (CN. 21-223-104) 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 

Prerequisite: CH 431, MA 301 

LR 0800-0930 (CN. 21-433-001) Staff 

CH 499 Senior Research in Chemistry 1-3 

Prerequisite: Three years of chemistry 

Hours arranged (CN. 21-499-001) Staff 

CH 699 Chemical Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in chemistry 

Hours arranged (CN. 21-699-001) Staff 

Civil Engineering 

FIRST SESSION 

CE 202 Introduction to Civil Engineering 2 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

LR 0910-1010 (CN. 22-202-001) 

LB 1020-1120 (CN. 22-202-101) Staff 

CE 301 Engineering Surveying 3 

Prerequisite: CE 202 

LR 0800-0900 (CN. 22-301-001) 

LB 1340-1620 TTh (CN. 22-301-101) Staff 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 3 

Prerequisite: EM 301 

LR 0800-0900 (CN. 22-325-001) 

LB 1340-1620 TTh (CN. 22-325-101) Staff 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 3 

Prerequisite: MAT 200 

LR 1020-1120 (CN. 22-332-001) 

LB 1340-1620 M W (CN. 22-332-101) Staff 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis I 3 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 22-507-001) Staff 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects 1-6 

Hours arranged (CN. 22-598-001) Staff 

CE 698 Special Topics in Civil Engineering 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 22-698-001) Staff 



♦Students preregistering for this course must list one of the laboratory sections listed immediately 
following the lecture section. 

31 



CE 699 Civil Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 22-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

CE 598 Civil Engineering Projects 1-6 

Hours arranged (CN. 22-598-001) Staff 

CE 698 Special Topics in Civil Engineering 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 22-698-001) Staff 

CE 699 Civil Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 22-699-001) Staff 

Computer Science 

FIRST SESSION 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming 3 

LR 0800-0900 (CN. 23-101-001) 
LB 1340-1440 (CN. 23-101-101) 
LB 1200-1300 (CN. 23-101-102) 
LB 1520-1620 (CN. 23-101-103) Beaujon 

CSC 112 Basic Computer Organization and Assembly Language 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 101 or CSC 111 

1140-1310 (CN. 23-112-001) Finger 

CSC 301 Principles ot Systems Programs 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 112 

1340-1510 (CN. 23-301-001) Finger 

CSC 311 Data Structures 3 

Prerequisites: CSC 112 and CSC 102 (or CSC 211) 

Corequisite: CSC 322 

0950-1120 (CN. 23-311-001) Tharp 

CSC 312 Computer Organization and Logic 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 112, CSC 322 

0800-0930 (CN. 23-312-001) Patt 

CSC 322 Applied Algebraic Structures 3 

Prerequisite: MA 231 or MA 405 

1140-1310 (CN. 23-322-001) Robbins 

CSC 411 Introduction to Simulation 3 

Prerequisites: MA 312 and ST 371 or equivalent 

1340-1510 (CN. 23-411-001) Skinner 

SECOND SESSION 

CSC 102 Programming Concepts 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 101 

0950-1120 (CN. 23-102-001) Danielopoulos 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Languages I 2 

Corequisite: MA 102 

LR 1340-1440 (CN. 23-111-001) 

LB 0800-0900 M T W Th (CN. 23-111-101) 

LB 0910-1010 M T W Th (CN. 23-111-102) 

LB 1020-1120 M T W Th (CN. 23-111-103) Lewis 



32 



CSC 252 Principles of Programming — COBOL I 

To be graded S-U only. 
Prerequisite: CSC 101 

1340-1440 M W F (CN. 23-252-001) Staff 

CSC 302 Introduction to Numerical Methods 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 101 or CSC 111 

Corequisite: MA 301 or MA 312 

0950-1120 (CN. 23-302-001) Lewis 

CSC 412 Introduction to Computability, Language and Automata 3 

Prerequisite: CSC 322 

0950-1120 (CN. 23-412-001) McAllister 

Co-op Program 

FIRST SESSION and SECOND SESSION 

COP lOOE Co-op Work Program 

Houi-s arranged (CN. 25-100-001) Hamme 

COP lOOF Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-100-002) Saylor 

COP lOOL Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-100-003) Parker 

COP lOOP Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-100-004) Patt 

COP lOOT Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-100-005) Klibbe 

COP 200E Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-200-001) Hamme 

COP 200F Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-200-002) Saylor 

COP 200L Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-200-003) Parker 

COP 200P Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-200-004) Patt 

COP 200T Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-200-005) IGibbe 

COP 300E Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-300-001) Hamme 

COP 300F Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-300-002) . Saylor 

COP 300L Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-300-003) Parker 

COP 300P Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-300-004) Patt 

COP 300T Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-300-005) Klibbe 

COP 400E Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-400-001) Hamme 



33 



COP 400F Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-400-002) Saylor 

COI' 400L Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-400-003) Parker 

COP 400P Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-400-004) Patt 

COP 400T Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-400-005) Klibbe 

COP 500E Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-500-001) Hamme 

COP 500F Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-500-002) Saylor 

COP 500L Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-500-003) Parker 

COP 500P Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-500-004) Patt 

COP 500T Co-op Work Program 

Hours arranged (CN. 25-500-005) Klibbe 



E - Engineering students only. 

F - Forest Resources students only. 

L - Liberal Arts students only. 

P - Physical & Mathematical students only. 

T - Textiles students only. 

Crop Science 
FIRST SESSION 

*CS 542 (HS 542, GN 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 2 

Prerequisite: CS541 (HS 541, GN 541) 

* Conducted on an arranged basis during the entire summer, terminating approxi- 
mately August 9. Students should register for the course first session only. 
Hours arranged (CN. 24-542-001) Harvey 

CS 591 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 7 

Hours arranged (CN. 24-591-001) Staff 

CS 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 24-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

CS 591 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 24-591-001) Staff 

CS 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 24-699-001) Staff 



34 



Design 

FIRST SESSION 

(This course starts First Session and runs for nine weeks.) 

ARC 400 Intermediate Architectural Design (Series) 4 

Prerequisite: DN 202 or equivalent or consent of department 

1300-1700 (CN. 13-400-001) Staff 

Economics 

FIRST SESSION 

EC 201 Economics I 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-201-001) Fearn 

1140-1310 (CN. 27-201-002) Fearn 

EC 202 Economics II 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-202-001) Staff 

EC 260 Accounting I — Concepts of Financial Reporting 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-260-001) McBurney 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-260-002) McBurney 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 

Prerequisites: MA 112 and EC 201 or EC 212 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-301-001) El-Kammash 

EC 302 Aggr^ate Economic Analysis: Theory and Policy 3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 and MA 112 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-302-001) Poindexter 

EC 307 Business Law I 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 212 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-307-001) Pinna 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-307-002) Pinna 

EC 310 Economics of the Firm 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 212 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-310-001) Happel 

EC 326 Personnel Management 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 212 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-326-001) Miles 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-326-002) Miles 

EC 403 Family Economics 3(3-0) 

Prerequisite: One year of principles of economics and experience as an agricultural 
extension worker or equivalent 

0900-1200 (CN. 27-403-001) Ikerd 

Special three-week session (June 10-June 28) 

Currently enrolled degree students at North Carolina State University must pre- 
register through the normal preregistration procedures. All other students unll 
register the first day of classes. To assist the Department of A did t and Community 
College Education in planning, all students are requested to complete and return 
the info ivnat ion form by Friday, May 17. The foi~m may be obtained from Dr. W. L. 
Gragg, Department ofAdidt and Community College Education, 310 Poe Hall. 



35 



EC 448 International Economics 3 

Prerequisite: EC 301 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-448-001) Ball 

EC 475 Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 212 

1140-1310 (CN. 27-175-001) Turner 

EC 490 Senior Seminar in Economics 3 

Prerequisites: EC 301 and EC 302 and EC 317 or ST 311 (Plus two courses 

from list of restricted economics electives) 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-490-001) El-Kammash 

EC 502 Income and Employment Theory 3 

Prerequisites: MA 112 and EC 301 and EC 302 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-502-001) Poindexter 

EC 598 Topical Problems in Economics 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 27-598-001) Staff 

EC 603 History of Economic Thought 3 

Prerequisites: EC 501 and EC 502 or equivalent 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-603-001) Turner 

EC 699 Research in Economics Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 27-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

EC 201 Economics I 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-201-001) Ball 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-201-002) Warner 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-201-003) Olsen 

EC 202 Economics II 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-202-001) Thursby 

EC 260 Accounting I — Conceptsof Financial Reporting 3 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-260-001) Jefferys 

1140-1310 (CN. 27-260-002) Jefferys 

EC 261 Accounting II — Financial Information Systems 3 

Prerequisite: EC 260 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-261-001) Windham 

1140-1310 (CN. 27-261-002) Windham 

EC 262 Managerial Uses of Cost Data 3 

Prerequisite: EC 260 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-262-001) Ennis 

1140-1310 (CN. 27-262-002) Ennis 

EC 301 Production and Prices 3 

Prerequisites: MA 112 and EC 201 or EC 212 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-301-001) Baughcum 

EC 302 Aggregate Economic Analysis: Theory and Policy 3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 and MA 112 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-302-001) Wilson 



36 



EC 304 Financial Institutions 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 

1140-1310 (CN. 27-304-001) Jones 

EC 313 Marketing Methods 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 212 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-313-001) Staff 

EC 420 Corporation Finance 3 

Prerequisites: EC 201 or EC 212 and EC 260 

0950-1120 (CN. 27-420-001) Jones 

EC 440 Economic Development 3 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 212 

0800-0930 (CN. 27-440-001) Olsen 

EC 501 Price Theory 3 

Prerequisites: MA 112 and EC 301 

1140-1310 (CN. 27-501-001) Harrell 

EC 598 Topical Problems in Economics 1-6 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 27-598-001) Staff 

EC 699 Research in Economics Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 27-699-001) Staff 

Education 
FIRST SESSION 

ED 344 Secondary Education 3 

Prerequisites: Junior standing 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-344-001) Ivie 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-344-002) 

ED 421 Principles and Practices in Industrial Cooperative Training 3 

Prerequisites: ED 327, ED 344 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-421-001) Timm 

ED 428 Organization of Related Study Materials 3 

Prerequisites: ED 327, ED 344 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-428-001) Timm 

ED 483 An Introduction to Instructional Media 3 

Prerequisites: Advanced undergraduate standing 

1340-1650 Special three week course (June 10-28) (CN. 28-483-001) Gibson 

ED 496 Senior Seminar in Education 1-3 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-496-001) Staff 

ED 500 The Community College System 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate or advanced undergraduate standing 

1300-1430 (CN. 28-500-001) Ready 

ED 501 (SOC 501) Leadership 3 

(See sociology, page 69.) 

ED 502 (PS 502) Public Administration 3 

(See politics, page 65.) 

ED 520 Personnel and Guidance Services 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours in education or psychology 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-520-001) Morehead 

37 



ED 537 The Extension and Public Service Function in Higher Education 3 

Prerequisite: ED 510 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-537-001) Andrews 

Currently enrolled degree students at North Carolina State University must pre- 
register through the normal preregistration procedures. All other students will register 
the first day of classes. To assist the Department of Adult and Community College 
Education in planning, all students are requested to complete and return the infor- 
mation form by Friday, May 17. The form may be obtained from Dr. W. L. Gragg, De- 
partment of Adult and Community College Education, 310 Poe Hall. 

ED 559 Learning Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and 

Community College Education 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours in education 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-559-001) Glass 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Six hours graduate credit, permission of department head 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-591-001) Hanson 

ED 593 Special ProWems in Agricultural Education Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: ED 411 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-593-001) Miller 

ED 596 Topical Problems in Adult and Community College Education 

Credits Arranged 
Prerequisites: Graduate standing 

0800-1200 (CN. 28-596-001) Clark 

1200-1500 (CN. 28-596-002) Small 

1000-1300 (CN. 28-596-003) Roueche 

1200-1500 (CN. 28-596-004) Boone 

1300-1600 (CN. 28-596-005) Knowles 

Special three week courses (June 10-28) 
See page 21 for list of topics. 

Currently enrolled degree students at North Carolina State University must 
preregister through the normal preregistration procedures. All other students vnll 
register the first day of classes. To assist the Department of Adidt and Community 
College Education in planning, all students are requested to complete and return 
the information form by Friday, May 17. The form may be obtained from Dr. W. L. 
Gragg, Department of Adult and Community College Education, 310 Poe Hall. 

ED 597 Special Problems in Education 1-3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-597-001) Staff 

ED 598 Concepts and Strategies of Understanding, Motivating 

and Teaching Disadvantaged Adults 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing 

1300-1600 (CN. 28-598-001) Brown 

Special three week course (June 10-28) 

Currently enrolled degree students at North Carolirut State University must pre- 
register through the normal preregistration procedures. All other students vnll 
register the first day of classes. To assist the Department of Adidt and Community 
College Education in planning, all students are requested to complete and return 
the information form by Friday, May 17. The form may be obtained from Dr. W. L. 
Gragg, Department of Adult and Community College Education, 310 Poe Hall. 

ED 600 Organizational Concepts and Theories Applied to Adult and 

Community College Education 3 

Prerequisites: ED 503, PS 502, SOC 541 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-600-001) Glass 

38 



ED 621 Internship in Education 3-9 

Prerequisites: Nine credit hours in graduate level courses and 

consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-621-001) Staff 

*ED 630 Philosophyof Industrial Arts 2 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours in education 

0910-1010 (CN. 28-630-001) Olson 

ED 641 Laboratory and Practicum Experiences in Counseling 2-6 

Prerequisites: Advanced graduate standing, consent of instructor 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-641-001) Morehead 

ED 660 (I A 660) Industrial Arts Curriculum 3 

(See industrial arts, page 51.) 

*ED 692 Seminar in Industrial Arts Education 1 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing 

0910-1010 (CN. 28-692-001) Olson 

ED 693 Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: ED 554 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-693-001) Miller 

ED 699 Research Credits Arranged 
Prerequisites: Fifteen hours, consent of adviser 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-699-001) Hanson 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-699-002) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

ED 304 (PHI 304) Philosophy of Education 3 

(See philosophy, page 61.) 

ED 413 Planning Educational Programs 2 

0800-0950 (CN. 28-413-001) Bryant 

Three week course (July 2-July 22) 

ED 457 Organization and Management of Youth Club Activities 3 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-457-001) Parker 

ED 490 Seminar in Agricultural Education 1 

0950-1050 (CN. 28-490-001) Bryant 

Three week course (July 2-July 22) 

ED 496 Senior Seminar in Education 3 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-496-001) Staff 

ED 500 The Community College System 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate or advanced undergraduate standing 

1030-1200 (CN. 28-500-001) Segner 

ED 501 (SOC 501) Leadership 3 

(See sociology, page 70.) 

ED 504 Principles and Practices of Introduction to Vocations 3 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours in education 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-504-001) Cox 



ED 630 and ED 692 nmst be taken concurrently. 

39 



ED 506 Educationof Exceptional Children 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours of education or psychology 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-506-001) | 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-506-002) McCutchen 1 

ED 507 Analysis of Reading Abilities 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours of education or psychology 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-507-001) Rust j 

ED 508 Improvement of Reading Abilities 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours of education or psychology 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-508-001) Rust 

ED 520 Personnel and Guidance Services 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours in education or psychology 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-520-001) Poole 

ED 522 Career Exploration 3 

Prerequisites: ED 344; Graduate status or permission of instructor 

0960-1120 (CN. 28-522-001) Cox 

ED 524 Occupational Information 3 

Prerequisites: Six hours education or psychology, ED 520 or equivalent 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-524-001) Hopke 

ED 526 Teaching in College 3 

1340-1510 (CN. 28-526-001) Anderson 

ED 527 Philosophy of Occupational Education 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-527-001) Parker 

ED 529 Curriculum Materials Development 3 

Prerequisites: ED 525 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-529-001) Hanson 

ED 533 Organization and Administration of Guidance Services 3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, ED 520 or equivalent 

1140-1310 (CN. 28-533-001) Martin 

ED 538 Instructional Strategies in Adult and Community College Education 3 

Prerequisites: ED 559, graduate standing 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-538-001) Segner 

ED 554 Planning Programs in Agricultural Education 3 

Prerequisites: ED 411 or equivalent 

1340-1550 (CN. 28-554-001) Bryant 

ED 560 (I A 560) New Developments in Industrial Arts Education 3 

(See industrial arts, page 51.) 

ED 591 Special Problems in Industrial Education Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Six hours graduate credit, consent of department head 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-591-001) Visiting Prof. 

ED 592 Special Problems in Mathonatics Teaching 3 

Prerequisites: ED 471 or equivalent 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-592-001) Anderson 

ED 593 Special Problems in Agricultural Education Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: ED 411 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-593-001) Miller 

ED 594 Special ProWems in Science Teaching 3 

Prerequisites: ED 476 or equivalent 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-594-001) Anderson 

40 



ED 597 Special Problems in Education 1-3 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor 

A 0810-0930 (CN. 28-597-001) Learning Disabilities Gay 

B 1140-1310 (CN. 28-597-002) Educational Procedures for Children with 

Communicative Disorders Gay 

C Hours arranged (CN. 28-597-003) Staff 

ED 608 Supervision of Vocational and Industrial Arts Education 3 

Prerequisites: ED 527, ED 554, ED 609, ED 630 or equivalent 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-608-001) Staff 

ED 611 Laws, Regulations and Policies AfTecting Vocational Education 3 

Prerequisites: ED 527, ED 610 or equivalent 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-611-001) Visiting Prof 

ED 615 Introduction to Educational Research 3 

Prerequisites: PSY 535 or equivalent 

0800-0930 (CN. 28-615-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-615-002) 

ED 621 Internship in Education 3-9 

Prerequisites: Nine credit hour in graduate level courses and consent of 

instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-621-001) Staff 

ED 633 Techniques of Counseling 3 

Prerequisites: Nine hours from following fields: economics, education, 

psychology, sociology 

0950-1120 (CN. 28-633-001) Jones 

ED 693 Advanced Problems in Agricultural Education Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: ED 554 or equivalent 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-693-001) Miller 

ED 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Fifteen hours, consent of adviser 

Hours arranged (CN. 28-699-001) Dolce 

Electrical Engineering 

FIRST SESSION 

EE 202 Electric Circuits II 4 

Prerequisites: EE 201, MA 201 

Offered only in a 12-week sequence. The course counts for two semester hours in 

calculating load for each session. Students should register for four semester hours 

at registration for First Session only. 

LR 0800-0900 (CN. 30-202-001) Seagraves 

LR 0910-1010 (CN. 30-202-002) 

LB 1300-1500 M W (CN. 30-202-101) 

LB 1500-1700 M W (CN. 30-202-102) 

LB 1300-1500 T Th (CN. 30-202-103) Curry 

EE 213 Electric Circuits I Lab 1 

Prerequisite: EE 211 

1500-1700 T Th (CN. 30-213-001) Curry 

EE 332 Principles of Electrical Engineering 3 

Prerequisite: EE 331 

0730-0900 (CN. 30-332-001) Peterson 



41 



EE 520 Fundamentalsof Logic Systems 3 

Prerequisites: EE 314, B average in electrical engineering and mathematics 
0730-0900 (CN. 30-520-001) Bell 

EE 699 Electrical Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in electrical engineering and approval 

of adviser 

Hours arranged (CN. 30-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

EE 202 Electric Circuits II 

(See First Session) 

EE 350 Electric Power Utilization in Manufacturing Processes 3 

Prerequisites: PY 212, MA 201 

Not available to undergraduates in electrical engineering. 

LR 0950-1120 (CN. 30-350-001) Easter 

LB 1340-1620 T Th (CN. 30-350-101) Easter 

EE 699 Electrical Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in electrical engineering and approval 

of adviser 

Hom-s arranged (CN. 30-699-001) Staff 

Engineering (General Courses) 

FIRST SESSION 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

0800-0940 (CN. 31-101-001) Staff 

1020-1200 (CN. 31-101-002) Staff 

E 207 Engineering Graphics III 2 

Prerequisite: PY 205 

0730-0940 (CN. 31-207-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

E 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

0800-0940 (CN. 31-101-001) Staff 

1020-1200 (CN. 31-101-002) Staff 

Engineering Mechanics 

FIRST SESSION 

EM 200 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

Corequisite: MA 202 

0800-0930 (CN. 34-200-001) Gregory 

EM 205 Principles Of Engineering Mechanics 3 

Prerequisite: PY 205 
Corequisite: MA 202 
0800-0930 (CN. 34-205-001) Sheffield 

EM 301 Solid Mechanics I 3 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

0800-0930 (CN. 34-301-001) Gurley 

EM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 

Prerequisite: EM 200 or EM 205 

0950-1120 (CN. 34-303-001) Edwards 

42 



EM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 

Prerequisite: EM 205 

Corequisite: MA 301 

0950-1120 (CN. 34-305-001) Maday 

EM 307 Mechanics Of Solids 3 

Prerequisite: EM 205 

Corequisite: MA 301 

0950-1120 (CN. 34-307-001) Horie 

EM 699 Research In Mechanics Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 34-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

EM 200 Introduction To Mechanics 3 

Corequisite: MA 202 

0800-0930 (CN. 34-200-001) Hayes 

EM 205 Principles Of Engineeirng Mechanics 3 

Prerequisite: PY 205 
Corequisite: MA 202 
0950-1120 (CN. 34-205-001) Liddell 

EM 301 Solid Mechanics I 3 

Prerequisite: EM 200 

0800-0930 (CN. 34-301-001) Smith 

EM 303 Fluid Mechanics I 3 

Prerequisite: EM 200 or EM 205 

0950-1120 (CN. 34-303-001) Bhat 

EM 305 Engineering Dynamics 3 

Prerequisite: EM 205 

Corequisite: MA 301 

0800-0930 (CN. 34-305-001) Clayton 

EM 307 Mechanics Of Solids 3 

Prerequisite: EM 205 

Corequisite: MA 301 

0950-1120 (CN. 34-307-001) Bingham 

EM 699 Research In Mechanics Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 34-699-001) Staff 

English 

FIRST SESSION 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

General University requirement. 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-111-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-111-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-111-003) Staff 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

General University requirement. 

Prerequisite: ENG 111 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-112-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-112-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-112-003) Staff 



43 



NOTE: The prerequisite for all advanced courses in writing, language, speech, 
or literature is the completion of ENG 111 and E\G 112 unth a grade 
of C or better in at least one semester. Desirable preparation for litera- 
ture courses of the 300 level or above is ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207, 
ENG 208 or any semester of ENG 261, ENG 262 or ENG 265, ENG 266. 
ENG 205 Studies in Great Works of Literature 3 
The courses ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207 and ENG 208 are designed for students 
not enrolled in Liberal Arts. 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-205-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-205-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-205-003) Staff 

ENG 208 Studies in Fiction 3 

The courses ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207 and ENG 208 are designed for students 

not enrolled in Liberal Arts. 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-208-001) Staff 

ENG 261 English Literature I 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-261-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-261-002) Staff 

ENG 265 American Literature I 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-265-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-265-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-265-003) Staff 

ENG 321 The Communication of Technical Information 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-321-001) Dandridge 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-321-002) Dandridge 

ENG 323 Creative Writing 3 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-323-001) Barrax 

ENG 468 American Romanticism 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-468-001) West 

ENG 485 Shakespeare 3 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-485-001) M. Williams 

ENG 526 Historyof the English Language 3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-526-001) Meyers 

ENG 561 Milton 3 

Prerequisite: ENG 261 or equivalent 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-561-001) White 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENG 675 Twentieth-Century American Prose 3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-675-001) Knowles 

ENG 699 Research in Literature (Thesis) Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate adviser 

Hours arranged (CN. 36-699-001) Graduate Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

General University requirement. 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-111-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-111-002) Staff 

44 



ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

General University requirement. 

Prerequisite: ENG 111 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-112-001) Staff 

0950-1 120 (CN. 36-1 12-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-112-003) Staff 

NOTE: The prei-equisite for all advanced courses in writing, language, sjteech, or 
literature is the completion of ENG HI and ENG 112 unth a grade of C 
or better in at least one semester. Desirable preparation for literature 
courses of the 300 level or above is ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207, ENG 
208 or any semester of ENG 261, ENG 262 or ENG 265, ENG 266. 

ENG 205 Studies in Great Works of Literature 3 

The courses ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 207 and ENG 208 are designed for students 
not enrolled in Liberal Arts. 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-205-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-205-002) Staff 

ENG 262 English Literature II 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-262-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-262-002) Staff 

ENG 266 American Literature II 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-266-001) Staff 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-266-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-266-003) Staff 

ENG 321 The Communication of Technical Information 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-321-001) Blackman 

ENG 391 Introduction to American Folklore 3 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-391-001) Betts 

ENG 399 Contemporary Literature II— 1940 to Present 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-399-001) Staff 

ENG 451 Chaucer 3 

0800-0930 (CN. 36-451-001) Short 

ENG 453 The Romantic Period 3 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-453-001) Robertson 

ENG 575 Southern Writers 3 

Prerequisite: ENG 266 or equivalent 

1140-1310 (CN. 36-575-001) Kincheloe 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

ENG 650 Nineteenth-Century English Literature: 3 
The Romantic Period 

0950-1120 (CN. 36-650-001) Hargrave 

ENG 699 Research in Literature (Thesis) Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of graduate advisor 

Hours arranged (CN. 36-699-001) Graduate Staff 

Entomology 

FIR^ SESSION 

EN T 590 Special Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 38-590-001) Staff 

45 



ENT 699 Research 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (CN. 38-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

ENT 410 (BS 410) Biology of Insects 

Prerequisite: ZO 201 
Hours arranged (CN. 38-410-001) 
ENT 590 Special Problems 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
Hours arranged (CN. 38-590-001) 

ENT 699 Research 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Hours arranged (CN. 38-699-001) 

Food Science 

FIRST SESSION 

FS 491 Special Topics in Food Science 

Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor 
Hours an-anged (CN. 39-491-001) 

FS 591 Special Problems in Food Science 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing 
Hours arranged (CN. 39-591-001) 

FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science 

Hours arranged (CN. 39-691-001) 

FS 699 Research in Food Science 

Hours arranged (CN. 39-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

FS 491 Special Topics in Food Science 

Prerequisite: Senior standing or consent of instructor 
Hours arranged (CN. 39-491-001) 

FS 591 Special Problems in Food Science 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing 
Hours arranged (CN. 39-591-001) 

FS 691 Special Research Problems in Food Science 

Hours arranged (CN. 39-691-001) 

FS 699 Research in Food Science 

Hours arranged (CN. 39-699-001) 

Forestry 

FIRST SESSION 

FOR 204 Silviculture 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Prerequisite: Junior standing in FOR 
0800-1700 (CN. 40-204-001) 

FOR 263 Dendrology 

Sophomore Summer Camp 
Prerequisite: Junior standing in FOR 
0800-1700 (CN. 40-263-001) 



Credits Arranged 
Graduate Staff 



Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Graduate Staff 



Maximum 6 

Staff 
Maximum 6 

Graduate Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Graduate Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Graduate Staff 



Maximum 6 

Staff 
Maximum 6 

Graduate Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Graduate Staff 

Credits Arranged 
Graduate Staff 



2 
Duffield 



Ml 



Duffield 



46 



FOR 264 Forest Protection 2 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in FOR 

0800-1700 (CN. 40-264-001) Staff 

FOR 274 Mapping and Mensuration 4 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Prerequisite: FOR 272 

0800-1700 (CN. 40-274-001) Steensen, Jervis 

FOR 284 Utilization 1 

Sophomore Summer Camp 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in FOR 

0800-1700 (CN. 40-284-001) Staff 

FOR 491 (WPS 491) Senior Problems in Forest Resources Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (CN. 40-491-001) Staff 

FOR 492 (WPS 492) Senior Problems in Forest Resources Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (CN. 40-492-001) Staff 

FOR 591 Forestry Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate or graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 40-591-001) Staff 

FOR 692 Advanced Forest Management Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 40-692-001) Staff 

FOR 699 (WPS 699) Problems and Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 40-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

FOR 491 (WPS 491) Senior Problems in Forest Resources Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (CN. 40-491-001) Staff 

FOR 492 (WPS 492) Senior Problems in Forest Resources Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Consent of department 

Hours arranged (CN. 40-492-001) Staff 

FOR 591 Forestry Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Advanced undergraduate or graduate standing 

Houi-s arranged (CN. 40-591-001) Staff 

FOR 692 Advanced Forest Managonent Problems Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 40-692-001) Staff 

FOR 699 (WPS 699) Problems and Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 40-699-001) Staff 

Genetics 

FIRST SESSION 

FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

GN 301 Genetics in Human .Affairs 3 

(Students should have sophomore standing.) 

0800-0930 (CN. 41-301-001) McKenzie 

47 



FOR ADVANCED UNDERGRADUATES 
GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 

Prerequisite: BS 100 (Junior standing) 
1140-1310 (CN. 41-411-001) 

FOR GRADUATES ONLY 

GN 542 (CS 542, HS 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 

(See crop science, page 34.) 

GN 695 Special Problems in Genetics 

Prerequisites: Advanced graduate standing and consent of instructor 
Hours arranged (CN. 41-695-001) 

GN 699 Research 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, consent of adviser 
Hours arranged (CN. 41-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

GN 695 Special Problems in Genetics 



McKenzie 



1-3 

Graduate Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Graduate Staff 



Prerequisites: Advanced graduate standing, consent of instructor 
Hours arranged (CN. 41-695-001) 

GN 699 Research 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing, consent of instructor 
Hours arranged (CN. 41-699-001) 

Geology 

FIRST SESSION 

GY 465 Geological Field Procedures 

Prerequisite: GY 351, GY 440, GY 462 
Hours arranged (CN. 43-465-001) 

GY 593 Advanced Topics in Geology 

Prerequisite: Consent of staff 
Hours arranged (CN. 43-593-001) 

GY 699 Geological Research 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
Hours arranged (CN. 43-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

GY 593 Advanced Topics in Geology 

Prerequisite: Consent of staff 
Hours arranged (CN. 43-593-001) 

GY 699 Geological Research 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
Hours arranged (CN. 43-699-001) 

History 

FIRST SESSION 

HI 204 Western Civilization to 1400 

1140-1310 (CN. 44-204-001) 

HI 207 The Ancient World to 180 A.D. 

1140-1310 (CN. 44-207-001) 



1-3 

Graduate Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Graduate Staff 



Staff 
1-6 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 

1-6 

Staff 
Credits Arranged 

Staff 



Mulligan 

3 

Riddle 



48 



HI 208 The Middle Ages 

0800-0930 (CN. 44-208-001) 

HI 209 Renaissanceto Waterloo 1300-1815 

0950-1120 (CN. 44-209-001) 

HI 216 Latin America Since 1826 

0800-0930 (CN. 44-216-001) 

HI 233 The World in the 20th Century 

0800-0930 (CN. 44-233-001) 

HI 241 United States to 1783 

0950-1120 (CN. 44-241-001) 

HI 242 United States, 1783-1845 

1140-1310 (CN. 44-242-001) 

HI 244 United States Since 1914 

0800-0930 (CN. 44-244-001) 

HI 264 Modern East Asia: 1800 to Present 

0950-1120 (CN. 44-264-001) 

HI 322 Rise of Modern Science 

Prerequisite: Three hours of history 
1140-1310 (CN. 44-322-001) 

HI 403 Ancient Greek Civilization 

Prerequisite: Three hours of history 
0800-0930 (CN. 44^03-001) 

HI 463 North Carolina to 1860 

Prerequisite: Three hours of history 
0800-0930 (CN. 44-463-001) 

HI 467 Modern Mexico 

Prerequisite: Three hours of history 
0950-1120 (CN. 44-467-001) 

HI 566 The History of Urban Life in the U.S., 1865-Pre8ent 

Prerequisite: Six hours of advanced history or equivalent 
0950-1120 (CN. 44-566-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

HI 204 Western Civilization to 1400 

0950-1120 (CN. 44-204-001) 

HI 205 Western Civilization Since 1400 

1140-1310 (CN. 44-205-001) 

HI 207 The Ancient World to 180 A.D. 

0800-0930 (CN. 44-207-001) 



3 

Riddle 

3 

Mulholland 

3 
Beezley 

3 
Czupryna 

3 

Staff 

3 
King 

3 

Kearney 

3 
Czupryna 

3 

Mulholland 
3 

Sack 
3 

Elliott 
3 

Beezley 
3 

King 



3 
Nixon 

3 
Nixon 

3 
Nichols 



HI 208 The Middle Ages 

0950-1120 (CN. 44-208-001) 

HI 242 United States, 1783-1845 

0800-0930 (CN. 44-242-001) 

HI 243 United States, 1845-1914 

0950-1120 (CN. 44-243-001) 

HI 244 United States Since 1914 

1140-1310 (CN. 44-244-001) 



3 
Nichols 

3 
Harris 

3 
Crisp 

3 
Badger 



49 



HI 352 English History Since 1688 3 

Prerequisite: Three hours of history 

0950-1120 (CN. 44-352-001) Badger 

HI 446 Civil War & Reconstruction 3 

Prerequisite: Three hours of history 

0950-1120 (CN. 44-446-001) Harris 

HI 461 Civilization of the Old South ^ 

Prerequisite: Three hours of history . 

1140-1310 (CN. 44-461-001) *-"sp 

Horticultural Science 1 

FIRST SESSION I 

HS 414 Residential Landscaping 4 

Prerequisites: SSC 200, HS 211, HS 212 

LR 0800-1000 (CN. 45-414-001) H. J. Smith 

LB 1000-1200; 1300-1700 (CN. 45^14-101) 

Special three-week session (June 10-28) 

Currently enrolled degree students at North Carolina State University must pre- 
register through the normal preregistration procedures. All other students will 
register the first day of classes. To assist the Department of Adult and Community 
College Education in planning, all students are requested to complete and return 
the information form by Friday, May 17. The form may be obtained from Dr. W. L. 
Gragg, Department of Adult and Community College Education, 310 Poe Hall. 
HS 495 Special Topics in Horticultural Science Credits Arranged, 1-6 

Hours arranged (CN. 45-495-001) Staff 

HS 542 (CS 542, GN 542) Plant Breeding Field Procedures 2 

(See crop science, page 34.) 

HS 599 Research Principles Credits Arranged, Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (NC. 45-599-001) Graduate Staff 

HS 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in horticulture, consent of advisory 
committee chairman 
Hours arranged (CN. 45-699-001) Graduate Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

HS 495 Special Topics in Horticultural Science Credits Arranged, 1-6 

Hours arranged (CN. 45-495-001) Staff 

HS 599 Research Principles Credits Arranged, Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 45-599-001) Graduate Staff 

HS 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in horticulture, consent of advisory 

committee chairman 

Hours arranged (CN. 45-699-001) Graduate Staff 

Industrial Arts 

FIRST SESSION 

I A 203 Technical Sketching 2 

1020-1240 (CN. 47-203-001) Troxler 

50 



lA 210 Metal Technology 4 

Prerequisite: lA 102, lA 105 

0730-1040 (CN. 47-210-001) Troxler 

I A 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts Variable Credits, Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Senior standing and permission of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 47-590-001) Olson 

I A 592 Special Problems in Industrial Arts Variable Credits, Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: One term student teaching or equivalent 

Hours arranged (CN. 47-592-001) Olson 

I A 660 (ED 660) Industrial Arts Curriculum 3 

Prerequisite: lA 645 

0730-0830 (CN. 47-660-001) Olson 

SECOND SESSION 

I A 209 Wood Processing 4 

Prerequisite: lA 102 

0730-1040 (CN. 47-209-001) Bame 

lA 306 Graphic Arts 4 

Prerequisite: lA 102 

1340-1650 (CN. 47-306-001) Bame 

lA 312 Electricity-Electronics 4 

Prerequisites: PY 211, PY 212 or permission of instructor 

0730-1040 (CN. 47-312-001) Young 

I A 560 (ED 560) New Developments in Industrial Arts Education 3 

Prerequisites: Twelve hours education, teaching experience 

1020-1120 (CN. 47-560-001) Young 

I A 590 Laboratory Problems in Industrial Arts Variable Credits, Maximum 6 

Prerequisites: Senior standing, consent of instructor 

Hours arranged (CN. 47-590-001) Young 

lA 592 Special Problems in Industrial Arts Variable Credits, Maximum 6 

Prerequisite: One term of student teaching or equivalent 

Hours arranged (CN. 47-592-001) Young 

Industrial Engineering 

FIRST SESSION 

IE 301 Engineering Economy 3 

Prerequisite: MA 111 

Not open to students scheduling IE 311 

0800-0930 (CN. 49-301-001) SUff 

IE 591 Project Work 2-6 

Prerequisite: Graduate or senior standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 49-591-001) Staff 

IE 692 (OR 692, MA 692) Special Topics in Mathematical Programming 3 

(See operations research, page 60.) 

IE 699 Industrial Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 49-699-001) Staff 



51 



SECOND SESSION 

IE 420 Manufacturing Controls 3 

Prerequisite: IE 301 

0800-0930 (CN. 49-420-001) Tucker 

IE 505 (MA 505, OR 505) Mathenatical Programming I 3 

(See operations research, page 60.) 

IE 692 (OR 692, MA 692) Special Topics in Mathematical Programming 3 

(See operations research, page 60.) 

IE 699 Industrial Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 49-699-001) Staff 

Materials Engineering 

FIRST SESSION 

MAT 200 Mechanical Properties of Structural Materials 2 

Prerequisite: CH 105 and the first course in engineering mechanics 
LR 1100-1200 M W F (CN. 61-200-001) Fahmy 

LB 1300-1730 TTh (CN. 61-200-101) Fahmy, Staff 

(CN. 61-200-102) 

MAT 201 Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials 3 

Prerequisite: CH 105 

LR 1200-1300 (CN. 61-201-001) Fahmy 

LB 1300-1600 M W F (CN. 61-201-101) 

(CN. 61-201-102) Staff 

MAT 495 Materials Engineering Projects I 1-3 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 61-495-001) Staff 

MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments 1-3 

Prerequisite: MAT 411 

Hours arranged (CN. 61-595-001) Staff 

MAT 699 Materials Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 61-699-001) 

SECOND SESSION 

M.AT 201 Structure and Properties of Engineering Materials 3 

Prerequisite: CH 105 

LR 1200-1300 (CN. 61-201-001) Fahmy 

LB 1300-1600 M W F (CN. 61-201-101) Staff 

(CN. 61-201-102) 

MAT 495 Materials Engineering Projects I 1-3 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 61-495-001) Staff 

MAT 595 Advanced Materials Experiments 1-3 

Prerequisite: MAT 411 

Hours arranged (CN. 61-595-001) Staff 

MAT 692 Special Topics in Materials Engineering 1-3 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 

Hours arranged (CN. 61-692-001) Staff 

MAT 699 Materials Engineering Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 61-699-001) 

52 



Mathematics 

FIRST SESSION 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 

Credit in both MA 102 and MA 112 is not allowed. 

0730-0940 (CN. 54-102-001) (CN. 54-102-002) Staff 

1020-1230 (CN. 54-102-003) (CN. 54-102-004) Staff 

MA 111 Algebra and Trigonometry 4 

0730-0940 (CN. 54-111-001) (CN. 54-111-002) Staff 

1020-1230 (CN. 54-111-003) (CN. 54-111-004) Staff 

MA 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 

Credit in both MA 102 and MA 112 is not allowed. 

0730-0940 (CN. 54-112-001) Staff 

1020-1230 (CN. 54-112-002) (CN. 54-112-003) 

MA 114 Topics in Modern Mathematics 3 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent completed in high school 

0800-0930 (CN. 54-114-001) (CN. 54-114-002) Staff 

MA 115 Introduction to Contonporary Mathematics I 3 

Credit in MA 115 is not allowed if student already has credit 

for MA 102, MA 112, or MA 114. 

1140-1310 (CN. 54-115-001) (CN. 54-115-002) Staff 

MA 122 Mathematicsof Finance and Elementary Statistics 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or MA 115 

1020-1230 (CN. 54-122-001) Staff 

MA 201 Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 4 

Prerequisite: MA 102 

0730-0940 (CN. 54-201-001) (CN. 54-201-002) (CN. 54-201-003) Staff 

1020-1230 (CN. 54-201-004) (CN. 54-201-005) Staff 

MA 202 Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 4 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

0730-0940 (CN. 54-202-001) Staff 

1020-1230 (CN. 54-202-002) (CN. 54-202-003) Staff 

MA 231 Introduction to Linear Algebra 3 

Prerequisite: MA 201 

0950-1120 (CN. 54-231-001) Staff 

MA 301 Applied Differential Equations I 3 

Prerequisite: MA 202 or equivalent 

0800-0930 (CN. 54-301-001) (CN. 54-301-002) Staff 

1140-1310 (CN. 54-301-003) (CN. 54-301-004) Staff 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312 
0950-1120 (CN. 54-iOl-OOl) 

MA 405 Introduction to Matrices and Linear Transformations 3 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

0800-0930 (CN. 54-405-001) 

1140-1310 (CN. 54^05-002) Staff 

MA 421 Introduction to Probability 3 

Prerequisite: One year of calculus 

1140-1310 (CN. 54^21-001) Staff 

53 



MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I 3 

Prerequisite: MA 232 

0800-0930 (CN. 54^25-001) Staff 

MA 511 Advanced Calculus I 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312 

0800-0930 (CN. 54-511-001) Staff 

MA 512 Advanced Calculus II 3 

Prerequisite: MA 301 or MA 312 

1140-1310 (CN. 54-512-001) Staff 

MA 513 Introduction to Complex Variables 3 

Prerequisite: MA 425 or MA 511 
0800-0930 (CN. 54-513-001) 

MA 681 Special Topics in Real Analysis 1-6 

Hours arranged (CN. 54-681-001) Staff 

MA 683 Special Topics in Algebra 1-6 

Hours arranged (CN. 54-683-001) Staff 

MA 692 (OR 692, IE 692) Special Topics in Mathematical Programming 3 

(See operations research, page 60.) 

MA 699 Research Credits Arranged 

Hours arranged (CN. 54-699-001) Staff 

SECOND SESSION 

MA 2 Review Algebra 

0730-0940 (CN. 54-002-001) Staff 

MA 102 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 

Prerequisite: MA 111 or equivalent co